Tag: North Korea

David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see Kim Jong-Un has publicly back down from his threats to fire missiles towards Guam and discuss whether some new blunt talk from Defense Secretary James Mattis made the decision an easy one.  David rejects the push by the left and some on the right to move or remove Confederate memorials and statues and instead proposes more memorials to honor Union, slave, and free black figures from the war to provide more context.  And they roll their eyes as an ESPN commentator says he hopes a positive outcome from Charlottesville will be Colin Kaepernick getting a job in the NFL again.

Duck and Cover and Bert the Turtle

 

As Americans, we learned in the 1950’s that it might not be a good idea to take life for granted. In particular, children were deeply affected by the threat of annihilation by a nuclear bomb. The Virginia Historical Society described that period in this way:

Air raid drills. Conelrad. Bomb shelters. Duck and cover. All of these were familiar terms to Americans in the Cold War culture of the 1950s. The future looked uncertain in the new Atomic Age, and there was growing tension between America and the Soviet Union. People lived with the threat of nuclear war as part of their daily lives.

President Harry Truman established the Federal Civil Defense Administration (FCDA) in 1950 after the outbreak of the Korean War. As part of the Alert America campaign, the FCDA flooded the public with some 400 million pieces of survival literature that attempted to educate and reassure people that simple civil defense procedures would protect them from a nuclear attack. People received maps showing evacuation routes, families were encouraged to build their own bomb shelters, and countless schoolchildren watched the movie “Duck and Cover” and practiced hiding under their desks when they “see the flash.”

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the media hand-wringing over President Trump’s words towards North Korea and point out why Trump’s rhetoric is serving an important purpose.  They also throw their hands up as The Washington Post offers a glowing profile of D.C.-based anarchists and how all their rioting and property destruction is all for some greater good.  And Jim and Greg speculate about how a conservative group would be treated by the media if it behaved similarly.  Finally, Jim goes after CNN for their dishonesty in firing Jeffery Lord over a Twitter battle: “Just come out and say it — we’re tired of Jeffery Lord!”

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for August 11, 2017 it’s the Vive La Difference edition of the podcast with your hosts, nanoscientist Mike Stopa, and, would you believe it? co-host and Smart Girl Extraordinaire Teri Christoph! But then, where’s Todd??? Wish we knew. He is off on a soul-finding three month journey of non-stop silence in the Peruvian jungle, on a diet of roasted banana peels and tropical bird sushi. We expect him back next week.

In the meantime, Mike and Teri get to bubble our way through topics ludicrous and absurd for your listening pleasure. Look, the vibe is a little different than usual. I, for one, had a fabulous time.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Guam Gov. Eddie Calvo for pointing out that nuclear threats from North Korea are no big news for the tiny island, and that Americans there should go about their business as they would on any other day.  However, Jim and Greg still have some reservations about the idea of North Korea firing missiles designed to land just 20 miles off Guam’s shores.  And they throw up their hands in reaction to a new survey showing that more than half of Republicans would support postponing the 2020 elections if President Trump wanted to assure that only eligible voters took part.  They are exasperated both at the response and for pollsters asking a worthless hypothetical question in the first place.

Bill shares his thoughts on the escalating situation with North Korea and the chances that Pres. Trump will launch an attack. Then Bill talks with Alan Dershowitz, one of the sharpest legal minds in the country, about the Mueller investigation and whether Mueller is out to get Pres. Trump. Bill also continues his exclusive interview with Steve Wynn. The two discuss the dangerous polarization in America today and how we can bring the country together again. Finally, Bill talks with Joel Farkas about geopolitics and the quest for world dominance by Russia, China and other countries that threaten the safety of the world.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America focus on North Korea today, in light of the recent news that the isolated nation now has the technology to put a nuclear warhead inside one of its missiles and is now threatening a strike on Guam.  With such a development, Jim says, we may have to begin looking at the the possibility of accepting North Korea as a nuclear power, Jim and Greg discuss the unpalatable downsides to that.  They examine the statements President Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson regarding North Korea, as Trump promises “fury and fire” and Tillerson says that’s the only language that Kim Jong-Un understands.  Jim also delves into the history of the past three presidential administrations and their failures to keep North Korea fee of nukes.

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“This agreement will help to achieve a longstanding and vital American objective: an end to the threat of nuclear proliferation on the Korean Peninsula. This agreement is good for the United States, good for our allies, and good for the safety of the entire world. It reduces the danger of the threat of nuclear spreading […]

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North Korea Now Miniaturizing Warheads for Their ICBMs

 

Well, this isn’t good.

North Korea has successfully produced a miniaturized nuclear warhead that can fit inside its missiles, crossing a key threshold on the path to becoming a full-fledged nuclear power, U.S. intelligence officials have concluded in a confidential assessment.

The new analysis completed last month by the Defense Intelligence Agency comes on the heels of another intelligence assessment that sharply raises the official estimate for the total number of bombs in the communist country’s atomic arsenal. The U.S. calculated last month that up to 60 nuclear weapons are now controlled by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Some independent experts believe the number of bombs is much smaller.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America like the new sanctions approved against North Korea, and they really like to see China, Russia, and other countries cooperating in this effort to rein in the isolated nation.  They rip the New York Times for suggesting Vice President Mike Pence is planning to run for president in 2020 if President Trump does not, all because Pence is doing a lot of fundraising events — and they enjoy a little Kasich-bashing as the same Times article conjectures about Ohio Gov. John Kasich launching a primary challenge to Trump. And they react to Dunkin’ Donuts blaming a confusing store layout for an employee’s refusal to serve two NYPD officers in Brooklyn.

In this series of AEI Events Podcasts, AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt hosts experts and senior officials engaged in the development of human rights in North Korea to commemorate the third anniversary of the “Report of the Commission of Inquiry (COI) on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.” They propose an expert update on the human rights situation in North Korea and discuss how Washington and its allies in the region can seek to improve it.

This AEI Events Podcast features Justice Michael Kirby, former chief of the UN Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea, discussing international law with AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt. They discuss the mechanisms available under international law to hold the Kim regime accountable.

In this series of AEI Events Podcasts, AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt hosts experts and senior officials engaged in the development of human rights in North Korea to commemorate the third anniversary of the “Report of the Commission of Inquiry (COI) on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.” They provide an expert outlook on the human rights situation in North Korea and discuss how Washington and its allies in the region can seek to improve it. AEI’s President, Arthur C. Brooks, opens the event with introductory remarks. He offers a sobering reminder that the Kim family regime maintains the most dreadful gulag system in the world.

After introductions, a panel of experts engage in a discussion on the belligerence and denial of human rights in North Korea today. Panelists include Joanna Hosaniak (Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights), Robert King (former US special envoy on North Korean human rights), Go Myung-Hyun (Asan Institute for Policy Studies), and Greg Scarlatoiu (Committee for Human Rights in North Korea). The discussion is moderated by Jung-Hoon Lee (the Republic of Korea ambassador for North Korean human rights).

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America approve of White House Chief of Staff, John Kelly, firing Anthony Scaramucci, who Jim asserts was simply wrong for the job. They also condemn Nicolas Maduro for tightening his hold on Venezuela as a sham election gives him the power to replace representatives of the opposition-controlled legislature.  Jim and Greg mock Dr. Jill Stein, the Green Party’s presidential candidate in 2016, for her ridiculous comments made to MSNBC that North Korea is threatening the US because we “cornered them into feeling like they have to develop a nuclear weapon.”

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer UN Ambassador Nikki Haley in her firm-handed approach to the security threat posed by North Korea, specifically regarding China’s refusal to cooperate with UN resolutions against the isolated nation.  They also express frustration with national media over their lack of coverage of Rep. Steve Scalise’s condition as he returns to the ICU.  Finally, they highlight that most of those protesting Trump’s presidency are among the most wealthy in the DC area.

Bill talks with Joel Farkas about the media’s war with Pres. Trump and why Trump should not back off. Then he discusses the breaking news of North Korea’s successful intercontinental ballistic missile test with Gordon Chang. Finally, Seth Leibsohn and Chris Buskirk join Bill to discuss their new book American Greatness and why so many “experts” underestimated Donald Trump and got the 2016 election wrong.

Otto Warmbier and the Triumph of the North Korean Propaganda Machine

 

What are we to make of the strangely incurious reaction by most media outlets and commentators toward the charges levied by the North Korean regime against Otto Warmbier? Even if one accepts that civilized countries should tolerate the manhandling of their citizens by thug regimes for such ridiculous “crimes,” I find it odd that nobody is really questioning the facts surrounding his arrest.

Most of the articles and commentary I’ve read (including those by people sympathetic to his plight as well as the “white frat boy had it coming” crowd) accept uncritically that Mr. Warmbier took down a propaganda poster in a restricted area of his hotel (to their credit @jaynordlinger and Jim Geraghty appear to be notable exceptions, but the Smart Girls and many other Ricochet podcasters appear to have accepted the factuality of Mr. Warmbier’s offense). This despite the fact that:

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to North Korea’s release of an American hostage, express concern over troubling reports of his health condition, and marvel at how former NBA star Dennis Rodman seems to provide intelligence on North Korea that our own spies can’t uncover. They also discuss the rumors NewsMax CEO Chris Ruddy stirred up during a PBS interview about President Trump possibly firing special prosecutor Robert Mueller. And they question Megyn Kelly’s decision to host conspiracy theorist Alex Jones of Infowars on her new Sunday night show on NBC.