Tag: Nixon

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Willie: Welcome to another edition of Thunderdome! Boy oh boy this time we’ve got a real treat for you! We’re broacasting live from the History’s Sneakiest Bastards Connive-Off Invitational, and let me tell you we’ve seen some really underhanded dealings today. The skullduggery is only going to get better from here so stay tuned! As […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Punning Dreams

 

I used to be a terrible punster. I still have friends who are punsters, but I have spent many decades reforming myself. I don’t think I have originated or cracked a pun in at least a decade. Unfortunately, I do not seem to be fully reformed, since I just woke up from this dream:

A companion and I were walking around the outside of the White House. (I’m not sure who my companion was, just that I knew him in the dream.) Somehow, we had gotten quite close. In fact, at one point, we walked by a window and I saw a very Simpsons-like tableau with the current President and First Lady in bed. The President was thoroughly asleep and catching flies as he snored. (Of course, it was an inaccurate dream, since they wouldn’t sleep in a room on the ground floor.)

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. If Past Presidents Had Twitter

 

I am neither condoning nor defending Trump’s tweets, nor Obama’s. For good or ill, I suppose they’re just a sign of the times. But then I don’t use Twitter for any reason, and am thus saved having to care. That being said, I do wonder how past presidents might have comported themselves on their own tweets.

I am certain FDR would have made full use of the medium, though the thought of fireside tweets is itself very amusing. Not sure that Truman would have been enamored of it, and I can say with some certainty that Ike would have loathed it. JFK though? Now that bears some thought, and I’m guessing he would have been a frequent tweeter. LBJ’s tweets I am guessing would have been artistically vulgar, and Nixon’s would have struck fear in many. Ford’s likely would have been a tad clumsy, and Carter’s would have been sermonizing and depressing. Reagan would have made tweeting an art form. GHW Bush, or so I would guess, would have been uninspiring but reliably anodyne. Bill Clinton’s would have been focus-group tested for maximum appeal, and so would shift as with the winds while not saying anything concrete at all.

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Corrupt prosecutors and judges who get caught destroy their reputations. The public stops trusting them. Their prior work is tainted and courts overturn their cases. Our free press has been a watchdog that alerts us to corruption in government. In that role it has acted as investigator and arbiter in the court of public opinion. […]

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If we impeach Trump then certainly Hillary Clinton will become president. That’s how that works, right? So what can we do to appease our delusional lefty friends? More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Reminiscences: The 1970s

 

1970sI confessed to my seven-year-old son recently that when I was his age I was usually out in the street playing with toy guns and eating a pack of candy cigarettes a day. “Where were your mom and dad?” he asked. I told him the truth: “Entertaining in the den with real guns and real cigarettes.”

Couples with children were seen as blessed, surrounded as they were by forgivable versions of themselves. Children weren’t coddled but cherished and I still remember the pleasure my dad took casually cracking hard-boiled eggs on my head. The term role model did not then exist nor, for that matter, did solar subsidies, the prevailing belief in those days being that Americans could never be cowed into paying for the sun.

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Moses and Ramses, Holmes and Moriarty, Superman & Lex Luthor, Seinfeld and Newman, Cheers and Gary’s Old Town Tavern. None of these rivals can compare to the arch-enemies Buckley-Vidal. More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. A Glorious Anniversary: 20 Happy Years of Freedom on the Roads

 

On November 29, 1995, President Clinton grudgingly signed a highway bill repealing the much-hated National Maximum Speed Limit. In 1973, President Nixon signed the NMSL into law in an effort to force people to save gas. This law allowed the federal government to withhold federal highway money from states that didn’t drop their speed limit to 55 mph. Real-world fuel savings were negligible. Safety activists proclaimed that it saved a lot of lives, and would bring out charts showing that the highway fatality rate had dropped since the law was enacted. The starting point for said charts was when the law was enacted, and sure enough, the fatality rate decreased in the years after. Had they shown a chart going back decades, you would have seen that the fatality rate had been declining since the late 1940s.

There was a lot of opposition to the law’s repeal. Auto insurance companies certainly had an interest in seeing as many speeding tickets issued as possible. To listen to professional headache Ralph Nader, one would think the ditches would be running red with blood if the daredevils who populate the various state legislatures were allowed to set the speed limits for their own states’ roads. Since 1995, a whole lot of states have enacted highway speed limits as high as 75 and 80 mph. God Bless Texas, they have a toll road that’s 85 mph. What about those highway fatality rates? Still dropping. As a matter of fact, when states first started raising their speed limits, the highway fatality rates dropped in virtually all states; the states that raised their speed limits saw the HFR drop more quickly than the states that didn’t.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Serious Statesmen of a Serious Country in Serious Times

 

Nixon/Kennedy Debates 1960On the “Why Aren’t the Debates Debates?” thread, I posted a comment with a link to the first Nixon/Kennedy debate in 1960. Here are links to all four debates. I used what I could get: Only two have video, and one of the videos has Italian subtitles. If you have the four hours, listen to them, and consider that this was a serious time, and that both of these candidates spoke at length, in depth, about issues ranging from foreign policy, economics, agriculture, energy, civil rights, defense strategy, and numerous other topics, without notes and without repeating briefing-book talking points. The correspondents who questioned them asked substantive questions about serious policy points, and the candidates responded in kind.

Update: Thanks to ctlaw in comment #6, here are links to C-SPAN.org videos of the four debates. These videos cannot be embedded here, but are clean kinescopes of the original broadcasts. Click the links to play the videos. (2015-11-01 20:12 UTC)

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It is said the end of the Nixon presidency came about when GOP elders Sen. Barry Goldwater, Senate Minority Leader Hugh Scott, and House Minority Leader John Rhodes went to Nixon and told him it was over. If these allegations against Hillary can be sufficiently substantiated, is there anyone on the Democrat side with the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Respect for the Office?

 

Unknown-2As a kid from a rural agricultural community, I entered UC Berkeley slightly to the right of Barry Goldwater. But I was to leave in 1970 just to the left of Eldridge Cleaver.

Those were the days.

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The Daily Shot (Ricochet’s Indispensable Daily Email) informs me that this week’s special Halloween podcast guest is Harry Shearer. Aside from his role as the head in Rob’s horse costume, Harry’s got a fantastic little YouTube show called Nixon’s The One. More

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“I may be 101 years old, and still alive only because a high-tech umbilicus attaches me to a portable heart-lung-kidney-liver-pancreas-spleen machine,” former President Richard Milhous Nixon muttered to himself, “but I’ll be damned if I let that stop me from watching the show.” The ousted president gave the life-sustaining tube one last tug as he […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Dreaming of Richard Nixon

 

richard_nixon_fighting_a_saber_tooth_tiger_by_sharpwriter-d6bln06I dreamt last night of my childhood. Richard Nixon loomed large.

Watergate is my first explicitly political memory. I was five years old, and that summer my parents rented a huge house in Vermont. Or huge it seemed to me at the age of five: I imagine that were I to go back now, it would seem much reduced in size, as everything does when revisited in adulthood. It couldn’t have been that big; my father was an academic and my mother was a musician; there’s no way they could have afforded to rent a house as big as Buckingham Palace. But, to my five-year-old eyes, that’s how it looked. 

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