Tag: NIH

A Brief Guide to the COVID-19 Disclosures

 

justice and COVID-19The Intercept’s September 9 article, “NEW DETAILS EMERGE ABOUT CORONAVIRUS RESEARCH AT CHINESE LAB,” has a series of links that point to the 900 pages of official government documents they sued the U.S. government to release. Readers should treat the Intercept article as a guide to these sources.

The Intercept is making the full documents available to the public.

This link points to the complaint, the legal document initiating the civil lawsuit against the NIH.

Join Jim and Greg as they’re pleasantly staggered to see Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal publicly slamming the federal government for not doing more to get American citizens and our Afghan allies out of Afghanistan. They also dig into recently divulged documents showing labs in China were doing experiments with SARS-related cornavirus on mice with human cells and we paid for it. And they unload on the Biden administration for its ongoing lies about Americans and Afghan allies being allowed to leave.

Join Jim and Greg as they credit Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for taking action on the border crisis while the Biden administration dithers. They also react to the explosive Vanity Fair story exposing how State Department officials and scientists furiously tried to stop investigations into whether COVID-19 leaked from a Wuhan lab. And they sympathize with residents in eastern Oregon who want to secede to Idaho. While they think the likelihood of that happening is low, they also devise an incentive system for state governments to improve.

In this AEI Events Podcast, a panel of experts gather to discuss the role of government in medical innovation. AEI’s Thomas Peter Stossel begins with an overview of the eras of medical innovation. He describes the current environment and discussed how the value gained from medical innovation has changed over the past century.

In the following panel conversation, leading health and science experts discuss the role of National Institutes of Health funding, the future of academic bioscience, the recent crisis in quality of scientific work, and the future of medial innovation. Panelists include Jeffrey Flier (Harvard University), Daniel Sarewitz (Arizona State University), Frances Visco (National Breast Cancer Coalition), and Mary Woolley (Research!America). The discussion is moderated by Thomas Peter Stossel (AEI).

And, Then, There Were Two . . .

 

You know that things are getting really serious when Barack Obama cancels a fundraiser for any reason — especially when he cancels two fundraisers and actually calls a cabinet meeting.

The fact that he did so today suggests that he is really worried about something of genuinely vital importance — that he thinks that the news that a second nurse working at the Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has tested positive for Ebola might have an impact on the midterm elections three weeks from now. In his judgment, no doubt, It makes things even worse that, on the day before she tested positive, after her temperature rose well above normal, the lady in question contacted the CDC, and those who answered her call sanctioned her flying home on a commercial jet from Cleveland.

Mollie Hemingway Hits a Home Run

 

I readily admit it, folks. I miss Mollie. But she has not disappeared, and she has a piece on The Federalist website that you should all read.

To begin with she has discovered the woman in charge of the Ebola crisis. Her name is Dr. Nicole Lurie; and, some time ago, she was appointed Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services for — drumroll, please — Preparedness and Response; and her job is to “lead the nation in preventing, responding to and recovering from the adverse health effects of public health emergencies and disasters, ranging from hurricanes to bioterrorism.” Here is what Mollie reports: