Tag: Newt Gingrich

Are Trump Supporters Ready for Change?

 

Most food packages come with one of two expiration dates. One says “best if used by” a date after which the quality slowly declines. The second one says “use by” or “expires by,” after which the product may be hazardous to your health.

It appears that Donald Trump may have hit his expiration date. It is hazardous for Republicans to nominate him for another White House run.

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I’ve become a huge fan of podcasts, or as they say in the craft, “on-demand media.” I subscribe to several, from radio talker Hugh Hewitt’s “The Hughniverse” (his radio show without the commercials) to “What the Hell is Going On” by American Enterprise Institute senior fellows Marc Thiessen and Danielle Pletka. There are others. But […]

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Do Republicans Need Another ‘Contract With America’ in 2022?

 

Amidst debates among Republicans, such as the extent to which the U.S. should support and defend Ukraine, this has emerged: Do congressional Republicans need a positive, pro-active agenda to run on for the 2022 midterms? You know, like the 1994 Contract With America? Will it help? Is it politically necessary?

Then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich, flanked by future Speaker John Boehner, outlines progress on keeping their promises from the 1994 “Contract With America.”

In December, House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said he and his caucus is rolling out a “Commitment to America” over the year. It has already started with a “Parental Bill of Rights,” queuing off Governor Glenn Youngkin’s success with the issue of education with voters in the 2021 Virginia elections.

Do Black Lives Matter?

 

Black lives ought to matter; and, in my opinion, they once did. They once mattered a great deal. Not long after he became mayor in New York City, Rudy Giuliani introduced a new method of policing that concentrated resources where there was a plethora of crime. It resulted in a dramatic decline in the murder rate, and Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton took notice and poured federal money into similar policing reforms. African-Americans living in rough neighborhoods were the intended beneficiaries, and they benefited a great deal.

But those days are long gone, and I do not believe that black lives much matter now. They did not matter to Barack Obama, Eric Holder, the members of the Congressional Black Caucus, the white radical who passed as black and founded Black Lives Matter, and to George Soros who funded the outfit. These folks were perfectly prepared to do a number on America’s African-American community and to put their lives at greater risk for the purpose of mobilizing them as a political force.

To grasp what is going on, one need only look at the data — which Heather Mac Donald did a week ago today in a brief squib posted on the website of City Journal. Here is what she wrote:

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If you watch this video, please note one thing that is important about it: it was the fact that Newt went after the elites. It wasn’t the issue on the table but how out of touch our ruling class is that brought the people to their feet. Newt was dismissive of the questioner, too. It […]

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A day after the ambushing and murder of 5 officers of the peace and further wounding of 7 along with the deaths of two men in Louisiana and Minnesota Newt Gingrich and Anthony Jones (otherwise known as Van Jones) did a Facebook video together discussing race relations in America.  The interview began well enough with […]

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Trump? Nobody Knows Anything.

 

Donald TrumpOver coffee while we were all waiting for Mrs. Reagan’s funeral to begin last Friday, I had conversations with two of the most astute and accomplished political figures I know: Pete Wilson, former governor of California, and Newt Gingrich, former Speaker of the House. I asked each if he thought Donald Trump could win — not the nomination, which both believed he might very well grasp, but the White House itself.

Pete Wilson shook his head. “In the general, I’m afraid, Trump would get destroyed.”

Newt Gingrich smiled. “He could crush Hillary. Imagine Trump’s going to the South Side of Chicago and saying that the status quo of bad schools and declining neighborhoods and violence in the streets is just unacceptable. Imagine his saying, ‘I’m a billionaire and you’re not because they’ve rigged the system.'” Trump’s reach is so broad, the former Speaker argued, that he could become the first Republican in decades to win significant black support, dooming the Democrats.

Gingrich: “Trump Is the Candidate ‘Fox & Friends’ Invented”

 

Newt Gingrich had a friendly but biting exchange on “Fox & Friends” Monday morning. Host Steve Doocy asked him, “You talk to the GOP establishment, I mean, you’re part of it, for the most part. This is their nightmare scenario, what are they trying to do?” Co-host Brian Kilmeade added, “The billionaire is spending the least amount of money and running away with this thing.” That’s when Gingrich had enough:

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Chris Christie will not doubt receive a bump after dismantling Rubio during the ABC GOP Debate. That forces Republicans into reevaluating the viability of Christie in 2016, just we did for a short while with Newt Gingrich in 2012.   These are three items from Christie’s past that might be unforgiving for some, or deal-breakers to consider him this time round. Preview Open

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Nancy Pelosi Gets It. Will We?

 

Smarter than she soundsLong story very short: the president will almost always beat the speaker. To win the presidency, the Right needs not barn-burners but fire discipline. To understand the Boehner fiasco — and for conservatives, it has been a fiasco of our own making — we need to understand a bit of history. We need some perspective, and it would help to start with the first modern speaker, Tip O’Neill.

Tip O’Neill reinvented the House of Representatives. Previous Speakers, like Sam Rayburn, had been effective because they were able to put together large bipartisan coalitions to pass bills. But O’Neill put a partisan stamp on the House: he weakened the committee chairs and did his best to pass bills on party lines. O’Neill’s revolution wasn’t widely understood at the time, however, because O’Neill usually lost legislative battles to President Reagan. Why? Because when the president and speaker fight, the president nearly always wins. The president speaks with one voice, while the speaker frequently gets drowned out by the loudest and dumbest members of his caucus. National Review was right to note that Tip O’Neill shut down the government, but Stiles forgot to mention that O’Neill mostly lost those battles to Reagan.

Newt Gingrich continued the trend that O’Neill started. Gingrich liked to compare himself to British Prime Ministers, who very nearly elected dictators. But when Gingrich tried shutting down the government, the blowback forced him to yield to President Clinton. In Lessons Learned the Hard Way, Gingrich made a rueful admission:

The First GOP Debate: One Thought

 

The last time around — in 2011 and 2012 — I followed developments minutely, profiling most of the candidates and hoping against hope that someone would emerge on the Republican side who was more impressive than the godfather of Obamacare. But it did not happen. In the world of the blind, the one-eyed man is king, and Mitt Romney was the one-eyed man. The Republican bench was bare. We had has-beens (Gingrich, Santorum) and never-could-have-beens … and so, late in the game, I reluctantly, then a bit too enthusiastically, embraced Romney.

This time, the Republican Party has such a plethora of talent that there are three serious possibilities who did not make the cut for the late-evening debate. Rick Perry, Bobby Jindal, and Carly Fiorina are all superior to the best of the candidates that we had last time.

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Newt seems to like the idea of self-driving cars. I have to admit that it is an appealing idea that a line of cars could all accelerate at the same time to the same speed and use the drafting of the car in front. Here’s what Newt reports about the experience: The car drove itself […]

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