Tag: New York

Jim and Greg welcome poll numbers showing the recall effort against California Gov. Gavin Newsom gaining serious momentum. They also laugh at West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin for trying to pressure Republicans into supporting the “infrastructure” bill or else Democrats won’t spend trillions on that or on their even more bloated legislation. And they hammer New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for claiming he’s told the truth the entire time during the COVID pandemic.

Byron York is in for Jim. Today, Greg and Byron are glad to see New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo losing some of his longtime donors. They also react to a Buzzfeed story about the FBI’s infiltrating militia groups in Michigan leading up to the kidnapping plot against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. But did the FBI only foil the plot or did it push militia members to pursue the idea in the first place? And they reveal how congressional Democrats are planning to pursue an amnesty policy through the massive spending bill they hope to pass this year.

Member Post

 

Part 2 – the global power of drug cartels and the decades long history of their ability to establish significant distribution, money laundering, and even drug production and processing operations within the United States. In Part 1, I introduced two Mexican drug cartels. The first, the Guadalajara Cartel, was the first major allied consortium of […]

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Killer Cuomo Lied, Chief Minion Blames Trump, DOJ Family Business

 

justice and COVID-19Now it is apparently safe for New York Democrats to call out Killer Coumo. His top aide confessed to New York Democrat state legislative leaders that Cuomo’s team lied to them about the true number of old people he killed. The false excuse was that Orange Man Bad made them do it. The Democrats, with the truth and the cover-up now out in public, are making noises about ending the “emergency” and Cuomo’s dictatorial rule.

Cuomo aide Melissa DeRosa admits they hid nursing home data so feds wouldn’t find out

The stunning admission of a coverup was made by secretary to the governor Melissa DeRosa during a video conference call with state Democratic leaders in which she said the Cuomo administration had rebuffed a legislative request for the tally in August because “right around the same time, [then-President Donald Trump] turns this into a giant political football,” according to an audio recording of the two-hour-plus meeting.

In today’s edition:

* The Fierce Force expands with Claudia Tenney FINALLY being declared the winner in NY-22

A Modern Day Medici: The Life and (Tumultous) Times of Pannonica de Koenigswarter, Bebop Baroness

 

When we think Rothschild, it is almost inevitable that banking and high finance are the first things to spring to mind. Conspiracy theories come in a close second. But beyond their involvement in shaping the monetary map of modern Europe, or leading the lizard people, the Rothschilds were also major contributors to culture. (Baron Phillipe alone was a prolific vigneron, race car driver, playwright, screenwriter, producer, and poet). Even the family rebels had much to help give the world.

Charles, son of the first Baron Rothschild, was a Harrow and Cambridge educated banker who loved nothing quite so much as chasing after insects in the English countryside and around the world. In the Sudanese town of Shendi, a former stronghold of the Nubian Ja’alin tribe, he discovered and named Xenopsylla cheopis; what we know as the Oriental rat flea, the primary vector for the bubonic plague which devastated Asia, Africa, and Europe in the 14th century. He was a dedicated partner at NM Rothschild and Sons, though, and never missed a day at the bank. Instead, he used his scientific bent to the family’s benefit, keeping a close watch on the company’s gold refinery and working on new inventions for the extraction, location, and refinement of the precious metal. 

After a hiatus, the podcast is back!

In this episode, Seth and Jay along with guest Karol Markowicz, go through 2020 and offer up some ideas about 2021.

Ep. 261 – @10:29 Judge Jeanine Pirro on Spygate, Biden’s Russia Problem and the Vote-By-Mail. At @23:22 Jonathan Williams, Chief Economist and Executive Vice President at http://ALEC.org on the best and worst states economically.

First, Dave’s recap on the VP Debate and Biden’s ‘Kamala Problem’.

Karol Markowicz joined Ben Domenech to discuss her view of America, including her thoughts on patriotism and her experience as a New Yorker, after having immigrated to the US from the USSR. Markowicz is a columnist at the New York Post and a contributer at The Spectator and the Washington Examiner. 

Markowicz argued Americans should prioritize their country and its needs above political victories. True patriots will want the best outcome for the whole of the nation despite any favor it may bring to their opposing political party. In many countries, she said, leaders have ultimate authority. In the United States, however, the president only has so much power and the power of individuals shouldn’t be underestimated.

Congress Can’t Afford to Bail Out High-Spending States

 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (NY-D) speaks to union group. (Lev Radin / Shutterstock.com)

Congressional Democrats are doubling down on their demand that, in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the federal government must bail out free-spending states. There are several terrible ideas out there just now (destroying minority-owned businesses in the service of racial equality comes to mind), but this is one of the worst.

The crisis in problem states is fueled mainly by unfunded pension liabilities. Public employee unions and the politicians they elect have for decades promised lavish pensions to union members, far exceeding those paid to wealth-creating private-sector employees. But adequate funding was never provided and the over-optimistic financial market returns didn’t materialize. The result is a growing total of $4.9 trillion in contractually enforceable liabilities to state retirees. There is no way the states can make these payments.

The Future of Our Cities

 

Buildings on Hamilton Avenue, Detroit.

In 1968, in the wake of the assassination of Martin Luther King, a great many American cities were engulfed by riots. In one such city – Detroit – the mayor, a well-meaning liberal Democrat named Jerome Cavanaugh, made a fateful decision to rein in the police and let the riot burn itself out. To his judgment, the state’s governor – George Romney – deferred, and the riots went on for five full days. “Burn, baby, burn,” they said. And burn it did.

Eighteen years before, Detroit had been the richest city in the United States – with a per capita income exceeding that in every other urban area in the country. By 1968, it was no longer so well situated. But it was prosperous. It was vibrant. The architecture was stunning; the churches, beautiful; the picture palaces, a wonder.

Covid-19: My New York Experience

 

I can’t help but feel that there are two different experiences in the country with the coronavirus. There is the east coast experience and there is the rest of the country. When one looks at the state by state numbers, the two states of New York and New Jersey make up about a third of all the cases in the country and over 40% of the deaths. And the New York State numbers are incredibly skewed to New York City. I think it’s pretty much acknowledged that New York City and the surrounding suburbs have been the epicenter of the contagion. It does not surprise me then that we are reacting to the lockdown differently.

Here is my experience as a New Yorker, albeit one from Staten Island, which is subtly different than one from Manhattan. But Manhattan has actually been spared, relatively speaking. It’s the outer boroughs of the city that has absorbed the brunt of the pandemic.

Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams joins Seth Barron to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, as well as New York City’s looming fiscal crisis, how to address homelessness, the future of the Rikers Island jail, social-distancing enforcement, and more.

With more than 45,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, Brooklyn is one of the hardest-hit sections of the hardest-hit city in the United States. As president of the borough, Adams has responded to the pandemic with initiatives such as distributing personal protective equipment to NYCHA residents and calling for oversight on the handling of coronavirus victims’ bodies. Once the acute phase of the crisis passes, Brooklyn, like the rest of New York, will face a long road to recovery.

How to Kill Old People, by Andrew Corleone

 

Paul Mirengoff is no Trump fan, but he often provides excellent analysis and links, like the rest of the Power Line team and he has a damning piece on Andrew Cuomo’s coronavirus incompetence. This is a time of winnowing for leaders. Just as Arizona Governor Doug Ducey is no Noem, so Cuomo is no Insley. That is not praise for the Washington state governor, but a recognition that Washington authorities did something right at the outset, setting the Pacific Northwest on a different trajectory than the New York City area. A New York order could fairly be titled “How to Kill Old People, by Andrew Cuomo.”

The most outrageous evidence was not directly linked by Mirengoff, but his references made it easy to find. I have captured the New York State Health Department coronavirus order dated March 25, 2020. There is no need to highlight the most relevant portion, because the bureaucrats did it for everyone. Bear in mind that nursing homes were already known to be especially vulnerable and likely hot spots in any state not imposing the most draconian quarantine on those facilities, with the most stringent controls on everyone entering a nursing home, a long term care facility. Don’t take my word for it, “this is CNN,” on March 3, 2020:

A nursing home in the Seattle area is at the center of the US coronavirus outbreak

Dear Chuck…

 

Ouch. This was hinted at in the April 2, 2020, Coronavirus Taskforce briefing, but I still was not prepared for this level of smackdown. It serves as forewarning to the leftist hacks like Adam Schiff that their continued dishonest partisan assaults, including their planned grand inquisition just before the election, will be returned with politically lethal force:

Warning: set down your beverage, safely away from your keyboard and screen! Now enjoy a “Letter from President Donald J. Trump to Senator Charles E. Schumer.”

Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the coronavirus outbreak in New York City, the drastic measures being taken to control its spread, and the consequences of an economic slowdown for the city and state budget, the MTA, and New York residents.

New York—particularly New York City—is moving toward a full shutdown. Over the past week, schools have cancelled classes for an extended period and restaurants, bars, and many other businesses have closed. The historic losses in revenue to the city’s public-transit system alone will require a multibillion-dollar bailout, Gelinas believes. Read more of City Journal’s COVID-19 coverage here.

Governor Cuomo Calls Out the Guard: President Trump Should Alert Federal Forces

 

On Tuesday, March 10, Governor Cuomo called out the Guard to combat coronavirus. He did so to provide skilled manpower to disinfect public areas and to deliver meals to people who have been quarantined in their homes in the New Rochelle hot spot.

The deployment comes as experts debate how long the virus can live on solid surfaces, Cuomo said.

“So cleaning those surfaces is very important with the right material and the National Guard will be helpful on that,” Cuomo said.

Rent Control Laws Are Unconstitutional

 

New York City recently implemented its far-reaching Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act of 2019. That law enacted extensive amendments, all plaintiff protective, to New York’s 1969 Rent Stabilization Law (RSL). The Act imposes the RSL throughout the state. It also reverses the state’s earlier position on Luxury Decontrol for High Income Tenants. Formerly, when a tenant earned over $200,000 per year and paid a rent of at least $2,700 per month, the unit was decontrolled to allow the landlord the benefit of market rate rents. But under the new law, well-heeled tenants can continue to pay at most 15 percent of their gross rent on city housing.

The new act also sharply limits rent increases when landlords make improvements on a tenant’s premises. The older system allowed increases of up to 6 percent per annum, but the newer rules cap that figure at 2 percent, which makes it highly unlikely that a landlord can recover the costs of those improvements (assuming these are still made) over their useful life.

Finally, the new law also works a major change for the many units covered by the RSL but which are rented at below the regulatory cap. These below-cap rentals show how rents are in many areas constrained solely by powerful market forces: landlords cannot move up to the maximum rent levels when demand is not there. Nonetheless, the 2019 law treats the tenant’s current rent as a statutory base for calculating any future rental increases for that tenant. These landlords are now severely restricted in the extent by which they can raise rents going forward.

Prospective Fact Check on Monsey Machete Attack

 

There has already been plenty of finger pointing over the attempted massacre of a group of Orthodox Jewish men in Monsey, New York. The FBI is now on the case. Whatever explanations are offered up, by whatever source, check them against the map and what we have been told about the location of the attack and the attacker’s life.