Tag: New York

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Future of Our Cities

 

Buildings on Hamilton Avenue, Detroit.
In 1968, in the wake of the assassination of Martin Luther King, a great many American cities were engulfed by riots. In one such city – Detroit – the mayor, a well-meaning liberal Democrat named Jerome Cavanaugh, made a fateful decision to rein in the police and let the riot burn itself out. To his judgment, the state’s governor – George Romney – deferred, and the riots went on for five full days. “Burn, baby, burn,” they said. And burn it did.

Eighteen years before, Detroit had been the richest city in the United States – with a per capita income exceeding that in every other urban area in the country. By 1968, it was no longer so well situated. But it was prosperous. It was vibrant. The architecture was stunning; the churches, beautiful; the picture palaces, a wonder.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Covid-19: My New York Experience

 

I can’t help but feel that there are two different experiences in the country with the coronavirus. There is the east coast experience and there is the rest of the country. When one looks at the state by state numbers, the two states of New York and New Jersey make up about a third of all the cases in the country and over 40% of the deaths. And the New York State numbers are incredibly skewed to New York City. I think it’s pretty much acknowledged that New York City and the surrounding suburbs have been the epicenter of the contagion. It does not surprise me then that we are reacting to the lockdown differently.

Here is my experience as a New Yorker, albeit one from Staten Island, which is subtly different than one from Manhattan. But Manhattan has actually been spared, relatively speaking. It’s the outer boroughs of the city that has absorbed the brunt of the pandemic.

More

Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams joins Seth Barron to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, as well as New York City’s looming fiscal crisis, how to address homelessness, the future of the Rikers Island jail, social-distancing enforcement, and more.

With more than 45,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, Brooklyn is one of the hardest-hit sections of the hardest-hit city in the United States. As president of the borough, Adams has responded to the pandemic with initiatives such as distributing personal protective equipment to NYCHA residents and calling for oversight on the handling of coronavirus victims’ bodies. Once the acute phase of the crisis passes, Brooklyn, like the rest of New York, will face a long road to recovery.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How to Kill Old People, by Andrew Corleone

 

Paul Mirengoff is no Trump fan, but he often provides excellent analysis and links, like the rest of the Power Line team and he has a damning piece on Andrew Cuomo’s coronavirus incompetence. This is a time of winnowing for leaders. Just as Arizona Governor Doug Ducey is no Noem, so Cuomo is no Insley. That is not praise for the Washington state governor, but a recognition that Washington authorities did something right at the outset, setting the Pacific Northwest on a different trajectory than the New York City area. A New York order could fairly be titled “How to Kill Old People, by Andrew Cuomo.”

The most outrageous evidence was not directly linked by Mirengoff, but his references made it easy to find. I have captured the New York State Health Department coronavirus order dated March 25, 2020. There is no need to highlight the most relevant portion, because the bureaucrats did it for everyone. Bear in mind that nursing homes were already known to be especially vulnerable and likely hot spots in any state not imposing the most draconian quarantine on those facilities, with the most stringent controls on everyone entering a nursing home, a long term care facility. Don’t take my word for it, “this is CNN,” on March 3, 2020:

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Dear Chuck…

 

Ouch. This was hinted at in the April 2, 2020, Coronavirus Taskforce briefing, but I still was not prepared for this level of smackdown. It serves as forewarning to the leftist hacks like Adam Schiff that their continued dishonest partisan assaults, including their planned grand inquisition just before the election, will be returned with politically lethal force:

Warning: set down your beverage, safely away from your keyboard and screen! Now enjoy a “Letter from President Donald J. Trump to Senator Charles E. Schumer.”

More

Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the coronavirus outbreak in New York City, the drastic measures being taken to control its spread, and the consequences of an economic slowdown for the city and state budget, the MTA, and New York residents.

New York—particularly New York City—is moving toward a full shutdown. Over the past week, schools have cancelled classes for an extended period and restaurants, bars, and many other businesses have closed. The historic losses in revenue to the city’s public-transit system alone will require a multibillion-dollar bailout, Gelinas believes. Read more of City Journal’s COVID-19 coverage here.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Governor Cuomo Calls Out the Guard: President Trump Should Alert Federal Forces

 

On Tuesday, March 10, Governor Cuomo called out the Guard to combat coronavirus. He did so to provide skilled manpower to disinfect public areas and to deliver meals to people who have been quarantined in their homes in the New Rochelle hot spot.

The deployment comes as experts debate how long the virus can live on solid surfaces, Cuomo said.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Rent Control Laws Are Unconstitutional

 

New York City recently implemented its far-reaching Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act of 2019. That law enacted extensive amendments, all plaintiff protective, to New York’s 1969 Rent Stabilization Law (RSL). The Act imposes the RSL throughout the state. It also reverses the state’s earlier position on Luxury Decontrol for High Income Tenants. Formerly, when a tenant earned over $200,000 per year and paid a rent of at least $2,700 per month, the unit was decontrolled to allow the landlord the benefit of market rate rents. But under the new law, well-heeled tenants can continue to pay at most 15 percent of their gross rent on city housing.

The new act also sharply limits rent increases when landlords make improvements on a tenant’s premises. The older system allowed increases of up to 6 percent per annum, but the newer rules cap that figure at 2 percent, which makes it highly unlikely that a landlord can recover the costs of those improvements (assuming these are still made) over their useful life.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Prospective Fact Check on Monsey Machete Attack

 

There has already been plenty of finger pointing over the attempted massacre of a group of Orthodox Jewish men in Monsey, New York. The FBI is now on the case. Whatever explanations are offered up, by whatever source, check them against the map and what we have been told about the location of the attack and the attacker’s life.

More

Member Post

 

Take a look at this legislative gem from our Albany overlords: https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-finally-allowed-to-drive-20191215-odow3uzmpfa5rhslnhjz2pfcjm-story.html More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. New York’s Pipeline Fiasco

 

New York faces serious energy shortages today, largely due to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s insistence on banning fracking and blocking construction of new pipelines to import cheap natural gas from outside the state. He hopes to wean the state off of fossil fuels, which are said to drive global warming. Though the evidence concerning global warming and its deleterious consequences is quite thin, let’s assume, for the sake of argument, that the dire predictions of climate disaster are correct. If so, it becomes even more imperative to pick both the right sources of energy and the right way to get them to market. Solar and wind are too erratic to do the job, so we have to depend on some form of fossil fuel. Natural gas is high on that list. Unfortunately, the retrograde environmental policies of politicians like Cuomo is a key reason why New York faces an escalating energy predicament.

Today’s deep fear of climate change unthinkingly translates into abiding hostility toward any new technology for extracting and shipping fossil fuels. This regressive approach gets it backwards. As a rule of thumb, every new technological breakthrough results in higher levels of production with lower levels of risk. Therefore, it follows that we should encourage the displacement of old technology to capture these gains. The ideal way to proceed considers both the amount of pollution taken out of circulation and the amount of pollution added.

More

Member Post

 

A lot of interesting videos about history/geography keep popping up on Youtube’s right side. This is a fascinating little one about the search for information about a supposed ship race to determine whether New York or New Jersey should get Staten Island.   More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Every time I go to New York City, I leave it saying to myself, “What an awful place!” Every time I hear the song, “New York, New York,” I plug my fingers into my ears. My parents lived there for a short time. My father practiced law there early in his career. I don’t know […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome new polling showing that even in our bitterly divided, a strong majority of New Yorkers have a strongly negative opinion of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. They also slam Texas Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro for publicizing the names of San Antonio residents who have given the maximum contribution to President Trump’s re-election campaign and declaring they are funding a campaign of hate against Hispanic immigrants. And they roll their eyes as an MSNBC analyst insists President Trump is doing Neo-Nazis a huge favor by raising the American flag from half-staff on Thursday.

More

Member Post

 

If the people of New York are so down on Mayor Warren Wilhelm (AKA Bill DeBlasio), why, pray tell, did they elect him to a second term? Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani had some choice words today. In my opinion, the voters of New York get the government they elect, and they should not be griping […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Nicole Gelinas and Howard Husock join Seth Barron to discuss New York’s landmark rent-regulation law and its potential impact on housing in the city and state.

Lawmakers in New York recently passed the toughest rent-regulation law in a generation, imposing new restrictions on landlords’ ability to increase rents, improve buildings, or evict tenants. The bill made permanent the state’s existing rent regulations, meaning that future legislatures will find it harder to revisit the issue.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see New Yorkers souring on Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez despite her glowing media coverage and roll their eyes at her explanation for her dip in popularity. They also question the journalistic integrity at Reuters after reporter Joseph Menn held on to a story about Beto O’Rourke’ being a member of the hacker group “The Cult of the Dead Cow” until after his loss to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. And they argue that long shot candidates like New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who attracted a measly six supporters to his last event, should quit crowding the field and let more experienced and recognizable candidates fight it out.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Note to Democrats: Businesses Do Not Want to Have to Beg for the Privilege of Creating Jobs

 

The Governor of New York is disappointed that Amazon was unwilling to play the game of New York politics like a proper corporate courtesan.

“I do believe Amazon should have stayed and fought the opposition,” Cuomo said in a Tuesday radio interview. “It was a vocal minority opposition. Seventy percent of the people support Amazon.”

More

Member Post

 

The number of documentaries one can watch on YouTube for free is staggering, including some of the classic art documentaries the BBC released between 1969 and 1980. The impetus for finding them online was the news that a new Civilisations (yes, the English spelling) series was being released, and as this YouTube comment relates, it’s […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Nicole Gelinas joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss Mayor Bill de Blasio’s State of the City address, his aspiration to run for president in 2020, and his attempts to position himself as a national progressive leader.

“There’s plenty of money in the city—it’s just in the wrong hands,” de Blasio proclaimed in a speech loaded with tax-the-rich rhetoric. Since his first mayoral election in 2013, de Blasio has tried to position himself as a revolutionary. But in practice, Gelinas notes, he is “more old-school, big-city Democratic pragmatist than new-school, Democratic Socialist of America.”

More