Tag: New York City

Dennis Saffran and Seth Barron discuss New York City’s misguided family-reunification policies, which can have fatal consequences for children in distressed homes.

In the Summer 1997 Issue of City Journal, Saffran wrote an article entitled “Fatal Preservation,” which chronicled attempts by New York’s social-services agencies to keep children with their troubled and abusive parents. The policy proved tragic for kids like six-year-old Elisa Izquierdo, killed at the hands of her crack-addicted mother in 1995. Elisa’s mother had regained custody of her daughter over the opposition of relatives and teachers. Too many other New York City children have met similar fates.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. New York City’s Infrastructure Is a Mess. Who Is to Pay?

 

Bloomberg News/Businessweek ran an extensive piece about the potentially disastrous condition of Penn Station in New York City and the perilous state of the two Hudson River tunnels that feed it. The tunnels are over 100 years old. The construction fill from the original World Trade Center that was used to create new land changed the course of the Hudson in such a way as to erode the river bed above the tunnels. Hurricane Sandy partly filled the tunnels with salty water, and the salt deposits are eating away at the elderly concrete.

The tunnels now carry far more people than they were ever envisioned to carry into the busiest single train station in the United States, so closing them for repairs would congest commuter traffic horribly, and projects to construct newer tunnels to supplement these aging ones have never come to fruition. So the author of the piece, Devin Leonard, details in his article:

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Nicole Gelinas joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss how New York City saved its subway system after decades of decay and rampant crime from the 1960s to the early-1990s.

This episode originally aired on October 20, 2016.

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Nicole Gelinas joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the recent bombing at the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and how the city is managing the streets in midtown Manhattan to handle not only gridlocked traffic but also the threat of vehicle-based terrorist attacks on pedestrians.

On Monday, December 11, New York City was stunned when a 27-year-old man from Bangladesh attempted to detonate an amateur pipe bomb during the morning rush-hour commute. The incident took place less than two months after another man intentionally drove his truck onto a lower Manhattan bike path, killing eight people.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America shudder at the attempted terrorist attack in New York City but are glad this particular ISIS sympathizer only injured himself. They also slam CNN for not only failing to verify the information from its sources in its supposed Wikileaks bombshell but for failing to be the first to correct its mistakes and then saying its reporters did everything right. And they roll their eyes as leftists get bent out of shape because U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley wished CNN’s Jake Tapper, who is Jewish, a Merry Christmas.

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Stephen Eide joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the New York Police Department’s “crisis intervention team” (CIT), which trains police officers to respond to situations involving people with serious mental illnesses.

In 2016, NYPD officers responded to more than 400 calls a day concerning “emotionally disturbed persons,” some of whom are suffering major psychiatric episodes. Officers receiving CIT training are better prepared to de-escalate these encounters.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America break down how the Democrats easily swept the statewide races in Virginia and even reversed a huge GOP majority in the state assembly. They also discuss easy wins by Democrats in New Jersey and New York City, where the Republicans hardly appear to be a factor anymore. And they roll their eyes as Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake proposes a law to ban gun sales to people convicted of domestic violence – because that exact law already exists.

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Judith Miller joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the most recent Islamic terrorist attack in New York City.

Shortly after 3:00 p.m. on Halloween, a 29-year-old man from Uzbekistan, Sayfullo Saipov, drove a rented pickup onto a Hudson River Park bike path in Lower Manhattan. Within ten minutes, eight people were killed and more than a dozen injured. NYPD officers responded quickly after the attack began, shooting Saipov before he could cause more mayhem. He is in police custody, and details from the incident are still emerging.

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Bill shares his thoughts on the terror attack in New York City and how we should respond, particularly in regards to getting rid of the visa lottery program that allowed the attacker to come to the U.S. Then, Bill talks with Congressman Ron DeSantis about the attack, our immigration policies, and how Republicans should respond to the latest developments in the “Trump dossier” scandal. Bill interviews Congressman David Brat about the GOP plans for tax reform and what we can expect to see this week. Finally, Joel Farkas of the American Strategy Group joins Bill to discuss Pres. Trump’s potential nominees for Chairman of the Federal Reserve. They also discuss the upcoming next round of NAFTA renegotiations.

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This article explains the beauty of Democrat Run Progressive Government. 1. New York City has a bunch of teachers in their Government schools who are utterly incompetent, and even potentially dangerous. More

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Tevi Troy joins the Manhattan Institute’s Paul Howard to discuss a dreaded scenario: a bioterror attack in New York City.

Gotham’s status as a cultural and financial center makes it a more desirable target than any other city in the world. Of all the threats the city faces, a biological attack may be the most terrifying.

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Seth Barron joins Brian Anderson to discuss New York City politics, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s first term, the relationship between de Blasio and Governor Cuomo, and the controversy surrounding this year’s Puerto Rican Day Parade.

“Surging tax revenues and the continued peace dividend from 20 years of vigorous Broken Windows policing have given Bill de Blasio a relatively easy first term in the mayor’s office,” notes Seth Barron in a recent story for City Journal. Indeed, as his first term in office winds down, de Blasio is an overwhelming favorite to win reelection this November. But for many New Yorkers who lived through Gotham’s worst days two and three decades ago, de Blasio’s election was a troublesome sign of how fragile the city’s success might be. His likely second term in office might expose more of that fragility.

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Robert Poole (Reason Foundation) joins Aaron Renn on the ​City Journal podcast to discuss the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The Port Authority was originally founded to manage the region’s transportation infrastructure, but the agency has long been plagued by politicized decision making, money-losing facilities, and declining financial viability.

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​City Journal editor Brian Anderson and Kay Hymowitz discuss her new book, “The New Brooklyn: What It Takes to Bring a City Back,” which chronicles the history of New York City’s largest borough and its remarkable transformation from a symbol of urban decay by the mid-20th century to one of the most valuable and innovative environments in the world.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

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​City Journal senior editor Steven Malanga and contributing editor Judy Miller discuss some of the issues with the Port Authority Police Department, including a secret review of the department’s security readiness and the contentious relationship between Port Authority leaders and the police union.

Read Judy Miller’s full piece from the Autumn 2016 Issue of City Journal, The New York Police Force That Doesn’t Work.

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City Journal editor Brian Anderson and Manhattan Institute senior fellow Nicole Gelinas discuss how New York City saved its subway system after decades of decay and rampant crime that took hold from the 1960s to the early-1990s.

Read Nicole’s piece from the Summer 2016 Issue, “How Gotham Saved Its Subways.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Sunday. When it appears, I post the previous week’s review on Ricochet. More

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This is not a set for the next Ghostbusters movie or a Halloween headline joke. Sure, why not build a monument – an entry point, for the demons of hell, like New York City doesn’t have enough problems! The original Arch to the demonic god Baal was constructed in Syria 1800 years ago and was […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. New York’s Self-Inflicted Housing Crunch

 

shutterstock_152494718People who live in New York City know that its frenetic pace can induce anxiety. In part, that angst stems from living in a highly congested city brimming with energy. But there’s also the anxiety from New York’s crazy-quilt pattern of land use regulation, which a New York Times editorial recently labeled “High-Rise Anxiety.” The unease stems from the many overlapping restrictions both on new construction and the utilization of existing facilities. These regulations have created a two-tier system in which some prosper handsomely while others scramble to make ends meet.

The current housing crunch in New York, and in other cities like San Francisco, is attributable to the complex set of prohibitions and subsidies that shape these markets. Under the modern administrative law system, private property rights are of little consequence when a developer is trying to build. What matters ultimately is that all of the relevant “stakeholders” have a right to participate in an endless negotiation process before anything gets done. The de facto presumption is against changes in both new and existing housing markets. The building permit is the unit of political currency, and each requires enormous inside connections, patience, and luck to obtain. It can take developers many years to obtain their precious permits, if they get them at all.

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