Tag: New York City

Rafael Mangual interviewed NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea to discuss how recent legislative and policy shifts in New York present new challenges for police in America’s biggest city.

Audio for this episode is excerpted and edited from a Manhattan Institute eventcast, “The New Challenge of Policing New York.” Find out more and register for future events by visiting our website, and subscribe to MI’s YouTube channel to view previous discussions.

Back to the regularly scheduled broadcast!

On this show, Seth, Park, Grant, and Jay discuss Joe Biden’s speech addressing protest violence, how the media narrative shifted to cover the protests, and whether or not Biden’s speech is more effective for quelling violence or for his campaign.

Ep. 254 – Senator Marsha Blackburn, fresh from the #RNC2020, discusses Media Lies and will there be Durham Bombshells as a certain Democrat Senator is now proven to have leaked the FISA Application to the media (which started the whole Mueller investigation) & Senator Blackburns latest book The Mind of a Conservative Woman: Seeking the Best for Family and Country. Then @23:36 Writer, Producer and Comedian Michael Loftus from The Loftus Party discusses the Death of New York City, #RepublicansForBiden, and what would happen if Biden cancels the scheduled Debates.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Largest New York City Police Union Endorses Trump

 

In a rare endorsement, the Police Benevolent Association of New York City, a union representing 24,000 of NYC’s 36,000 police, has endorsed President Donald Trump for reelection. From Ivan Pentchoukov in the Epoch Times:

The largest union representing New York Police Department officers on Aug. 14 endorsed President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign.

Nicole Gelinas joins Seth Barron to discuss recent violence on New York’s Upper West Side, why the decision to house homeless men in nearby hotels isn’t good for them or their neighbors, and the risk that the city faces of losing wealthier residents due to quality-of-life concerns.

Karol Markowicz joined Ben Domenech to discuss her view of America, including her thoughts on patriotism and her experience as a New Yorker, after having immigrated to the US from the USSR. Markowicz is a columnist at the New York Post and a contributer at The Spectator and the Washington Examiner. 

Markowicz argued Americans should prioritize their country and its needs above political victories. True patriots will want the best outcome for the whole of the nation despite any favor it may bring to their opposing political party. In many countries, she said, leaders have ultimate authority. In the United States, however, the president only has so much power and the power of individuals shouldn’t be underestimated.

Member Post

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-53356431/black-lives-matter-painted-outside-trump-tower-in-new-york I don’t know why this creates a special disgust in me but no one is explaining: How are they renaming streets and adding mega graffitti so easily? Would some other group be able to do this? Normal city processes for review of any change in the right of way are Byzantine unless initiated by […]

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Comedian Ryan Long joined host Ben Domenech to discuss cancel culture within the comedy industry and Long’s perspective on the recent protests. Long’s work can be found in his podcast “The Boyscast with Ryan Long” or on his YouTube channel.

Long argued the hypocrisy of woke white women demanding change for women and transgenders has moved the political conversation far away from the original discussion of police brutality and racial equality. The left, more generally, has taken an issue that began with a specific need for change and escalated it to involve many unrelated, larger issues.

As the country is rocked by the death of Mr. George Floyd and the resulting civil disorder, Dave hears from two people with crucial front row seats. First, Ricochet Co-Founder Rob Long calls in from New York City to share what he’s seen downtown and what he sees in the country at large. Then, Ricochet Member Duke Powell calls in from Minneapolis to talk about what happened to George Floyd. Mr. Powell has 36 years of EMS experience, and he retired from the same agency that responded to Mr. Floyd on that awful day. Mr. Powell shares with Dave what protocols should have been followed and where he believes events took a fatal turn.

Finally, if you’re listening to Dave’s show, but you’re not a Ricochet member, there is a way you can get a 30 day free trial membership . Tune in to learn more!

Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the eruption of lawlessness in Midtown Manhattan and other parts of New York City and the inability of Mayor de Blasio and the NYPD to quell the worst criminal violence.

In the wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody in Minneapolis, cities across the nation have seen large demonstrations in the last week. Many have degenerated into urban riots, with violence, looting, and property destruction, in a wholesale collapse of public order. In New York City, clashes between protesters and police in Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan turned violent over the weekend, followed by fires and looting in midtown and the Bronx on Monday night. Meantime, the city’s elected officials refuse to tell demonstrators to stay home amid the escalating violence and a still-active coronavirus pandemic.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Cross Between Albert Einstein and Arnold Schwarzenegger…

 

… the body of Albert Einstein and the mind of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Early in the Wuhan virus outbreak, we had a choice between two distinct paths: we could broadly shut down the country, creating an obvious economic disaster in hopes of limiting the spread of the virus; or we could isolate what we believed to be the most at-risk population, the elderly and sick, and allow the economy to continue functioning.

Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams joins Seth Barron to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, as well as New York City’s looming fiscal crisis, how to address homelessness, the future of the Rikers Island jail, social-distancing enforcement, and more.

With more than 45,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, Brooklyn is one of the hardest-hit sections of the hardest-hit city in the United States. As president of the borough, Adams has responded to the pandemic with initiatives such as distributing personal protective equipment to NYCHA residents and calling for oversight on the handling of coronavirus victims’ bodies. Once the acute phase of the crisis passes, Brooklyn, like the rest of New York, will face a long road to recovery.

Arpit Gupta joins Brian Anderson to discuss how New York City can safely restart its economy and allow people to resume normal activities—the subject of his new Manhattan Institute issue brief (coauthored with Dr. Jonathan Ellen), “A Strategy for Reopening New York City’s Economy.”

As the U.S. city most affected by the coronavirus, New York faces unique challenges in its road to recovery. The key question remains: how can the city’s economy reopen safely? The issue brief provides a strategic blueprint for doing that, with two key components: effective measures to reduce the risks of new infection and a phased approach that protects vulnerable populations.

Edward L. Glaeser joins Brian Anderson to discuss the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic on city life in America, the connection between urban density and contagious disease, how to prepare for the threat of future outbreaks, and the economic-policy response of leaders in Washington.

As New York enters its second month under effective lockdown, Glaeser reminds us that “density and connection to the outside world—the defining characteristics of great cities—can also turn deadly.” Contagious disease has always been the enemy of urban life; overcoming it in the past has required massive investments in sanitary infrastructure. The current pandemic could prove a long-run disaster for urban residents and workers unless public fear is alleviated.

Rev. Franklin Graham, president and CEO of Samaritan’s Purse and son of the late evangelical leader Billy Graham, joins Howard Husock to discuss his organization’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, the volunteers behind these efforts, and how secular Americans can better understand faith-inspired philanthropic work.

In New York City’s Central Park, Graham’s disaster-relief organization set up a field hospital to treat patients overflowing from nearby Mount Sinai Hospital. Since the facility opened, its medical teams have treated more than 100 patients. Graham notes that he’s following in his grandfather’s footsteps, providing medical help not only in New York but also in China, where Samaritan’s Purse has donated supplies and personal protective equipment. “American civil society,” writes Husock, “diverse and self-organized, still responds to need.”

Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the latest developments in New York City’s fight against the coronavirus, the impact of the city’s lockdown on future growth, and the response of state and local leaders.

As New York continues under lockdown, the effects of the coronavirus outbreak are becoming evident: the city’s death toll has passed 1,000, with more than 40,000 confirmed cases. In addition to health-care professionals, essential public employees like the city’s transit workers and NYPD officers are falling ill at a troubling rate. Mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo have responded to the crisis with varying degrees of effectiveness, but the outbreak has revealed a lack of preparedness for a public-health emergency of this scale.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Coronavirus Graphs Update: Pray for the Big Apple

 

There has been a very significant increase in reported WuFlu cases out of New York City during the last few days. I’ve been monitoring the spread of this disease carefully for a bit over a week, and this new NYC data has been the greatest cause for concern that I have observed. I had to find a new data source to address this, from Johns Hopkins (technical note in the comments).

Pray for New York. Pray for Gov. Cuomo and Mayor DeBlasio to lead the people of NYC with wisdom and resolve. Pray for President Trump, and other federal authorities, to provide them with the assistance that they may need.

Seth Barron and Nicole Gelinas discuss the coronavirus outbreak in New York City, the drastic measures being taken to control its spread, and the consequences of an economic slowdown for the city and state budget, the MTA, and New York residents.

New York—particularly New York City—is moving toward a full shutdown. Over the past week, schools have cancelled classes for an extended period and restaurants, bars, and many other businesses have closed. The historic losses in revenue to the city’s public-transit system alone will require a multibillion-dollar bailout, Gelinas believes. Read more of City Journal’s COVID-19 coverage here.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The New York Wrecking Ball

 

A NYC judge has ordered that the top half of the nearly-completed 200 Amsterdam building be lopped off.
New York City’s dicey legal system has garnered some more unwelcome publicity lately. In January 2019, Judge W. Franc Perry held that the building permit issued for the construction of the high-rise on 200 Amsterdam Avenue had been issued illegally, even though the developer had complied with all the applicable rules that the City’s Department of Buildings (DOB) required for a permit. The shoe dropped when 13 months later he ordered the developer to lop off the top half of the 52-story building in order to bring it in compliance with the zoning code.

Just how did this sorry spectacle come to pass? As my NYU colleague Roderick Hills wrote in City Journal, the permit had been issued in 2017 pursuant to a 1978 guidance of the DOB, known as the Minkin Memo, which stated “a single zoning lot … may consist of one or more tax lots or parts of tax lots.” In ordinary English, this cryptic ruling was universally understood to allow a developer to assemble one buildable lot out of many separate tax lots, which developers had done successfully 28 times since 1978.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Does Someone Have to Die?

 

I’ve been reaching a point where I dislike beating the drum about anti-Semitism. But the recent crimes in New York City and the denials that have accompanied them have convinced me that I can’t beat that drum enough. The media is reluctantly covering the story of the latest attacks on Jews in New York:

In Rockland County last night, during a Chanukah celebration at a synagogue a man stormed in with a machete and stabbed at least five victims, who were taken to the hospital. This is the latest in a string of antisemitic attacks in the New York City area, coming in the wake of the tragic killing of four people during an attack on a Jewish grocery store in Jersey City.