Tag: New York City

Statue-worthy Women

 

The First Lady of New York City, Chirlane McCray, decided to do something about the fact that there are very few statues of women in the city. She asked New Yorkers to nominate females that were worthy of having a statue in New York. The most nominated woman was Mother Frances Cabrini. Cabrini is a Catholic saint. She came to New York in the 1800s and set up missions for Italian immigrants. Italian Americans have had a huge impact on the city and Mother Cabrini played an important role in assisting this immigrant community.

When finally selecting seven statue-worthy women, McCray left Cabrini off her list. Many in the Italian American community felt slighted. Actor Chazz Palminteri went so far as calling McCray a racist for snubbing the Italian woman. Now McCray is married to Bill de Blasio, so maybe she hasn’t had a great example of Italian Americans. Still, is the mother of two half Italian kids really racists against Italians? Let’s take a look at who did make the cut:

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Looks like Carl Icahn is the lastest wealthy New Yorker headed for a more tax friendly climate: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-people-icahn-idUSKCN1VY02I More

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Corey Johnson, Speaker of the New York City Council, joins Seth Barron to discuss the state of New York City’s transit system and his plan to break up the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), allowing the city to take control of its buses, subways, bridges, and tunnels. According to Johnson, direct control of the MTA would […]

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Yeah, It Looks Like New York City Made a Big Mistake Spurning Amazon

 

Technically, I guess, it was Amazon who rejected the Big Apple last February — deciding not to build a massive corporate campus in Queens and locating some 25,000 jobs there — rather than the other way around. (The company is still coming to Virginia, the other winner of its nationwide “search.”)

But that cancelation of Amazon’s announced plans came after “an unexpectedly fierce backlash from lawmakers, progressive activists, and union leaders, who contended that the tech giant did not deserve nearly $3 billion in government incentives,” according to The New York Times. A comparatively small group of noisy activists may have seen it as a victory, but most New Yorkers didn’t. Same with Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio who sought to “diversify the city’s economy from being so dependent on Wall Street.”

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Sarah Solomon, author of Guac is Extra But So Am I: The Reluctant Adult’s Handbook, stops by to talk why life gets better as you get older, getting to the point where you get over your jealousy of other women, struggling with depression and anxiety in the age of social media, and how parenting seems […]

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Ray Domanico joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza’s controversial and divisive leadership of the nation’s largest public school system. Domanico details Carranza’s emphasis on ridding schools of purported racial bias in his recent essay for City Journal, “Richard Carranza’s Deflections.” Over the past four decades, with varying levels of success, Carranza’s […]

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Stephen Eide joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss how homeless services are putting pressure on one of New York City’s most valued cultural institutions: the New York Public Library. Eide describes the situation in “Disorder in the Stacks,” his story in the Spring 2019 Issue of City Journal. More

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Urbanist Alain Bertaud joins Michael Hendrix to discuss how urban planners and economists can improve city management. Bertaud’s book Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities argues that markets provide the indispensable mechanism for cities’ growth. The book is a summation of what Bertaud has learned in a lifetime spent as an urban planner, including a stint at the […]

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Nicole Gelinas and Aaron Renn join Seth Barron to discuss recent developments in New York and Chicago. In the first week of April, both cities marked milestones: Manhattan got the nation’s first congestion-pricing plan, courtesy of the state legislature, while Chicago elected its first black woman as mayor. More

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are a bit surprised by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff signaling they don’t plan to pursue impeachment of President Trump unless there’s a bipartisan consensus for it. They also look on sadly as New York City’s exorbitant taxes […]

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Nicole Gelinas joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss Mayor Bill de Blasio’s State of the City address, his aspiration to run for president in 2020, and his attempts to position himself as a national progressive leader. “There’s plenty of money in the city—it’s just in the wrong hands,” de Blasio proclaimed in a speech loaded with tax-the-rich […]

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City Journal contributing editor Howard Husock joins associate editor Seth Barron to discuss problems at the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). With some 400,000 residents, NYCHA is the nation’s largest public housing system. In recent years, news reports have documented extensive corruption at the agency along with chronic problems at NYCHA properties, including heating outages, broken elevators, high lead-paint […]

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Nicole Gelinas joins Seth Barron to discuss the chaos that commuters and tourists endure on a daily basis in midtown Manhattan—especially during the holiday season. Every year, city officials are criticized for their poor handling of holiday crowds and the traffic that fills the streets. This year promises to be even worse. As Gelinas has documented, tourists visiting the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center are […]

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Nicole Gelinas joins Howard Husock to discuss the resolution of Amazon’s year-long “HQ2” competition. This week, the Internet giant announced that it would open new offices in Crystal City, Virginia—near Washington, D.C.—and New York’s own Long Island City, Queens. Located just across the East River from midtown Manhattan, Long Island City had struggled for years as a post-industrial neighborhood until the early 2000s, when rezoning allowed the […]

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City Journal’s Brian Anderson and Seth Barron discuss New York’s upcoming elections and the prospect of a state government run entirely by Democrats. New York’s local politics have long been driven by a partisan split in the state legislature. With the help of moderate Democrats, Republicans have held a narrow majority in the state senate since 2010. This year, however, many of those moderates were […]

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Remembering 9/11: Across the Hudson

 
Tribute in Light
Tribute in Light, September 2002. Image by Oblomov.

Everything about September 11, 2001, was unprecedented. That day witnessed, among other things, the largest maritime evacuation in history. More than half a million people stranded on Manhattan Island were taken off by boat in the course of eight hours. By comparison, at Dunkirk in late May of 1940, some 338,000 allied troops were evacuated across the English Channel over the course of nine days. There is a moving short film called Boatlift about this amazing and massive instance of spontaneous cooperative order amidst chaos and destruction, which I highly recommend.

I was part of that 9/11 boatlift. I’m pretty sure that I was on the first boat, among the first refugees from Lower Manhattan to cross the Hudson. I don’t want to use the word “survivors” because, at least in my case, my life was never really in danger. My story is completely devoid of heroism. But I did witness the events of that day from uncomfortably close range, and an anniversary seems as good an occasion as any to write it down, before the memories, which are still vivid, fade.

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Former NYPD and LAPD commissioner William J. Bratton joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss Bratton’s 40-plus-year career in law enforcement, the lessons learned in New York and Los Angeles, and the challenges facing American police. Bratton began his career in Boston, where he joined the police department in 1970 after serving three years in the U.S. Army’s […]

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Steven Malanga joins Seth Barron to discuss the dismal economic and fiscal health of New Jersey, where individual and corporate taxes are among the highest in the country and business confidence ranks among the lowest of the 50 states. Jersey also has one of America’s worst-funded government-worker pension systems, which led its leaders in 2017 to divert state-lottery proceeds intended […]

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The other day I came across an interesting video at the YouTube page of a fellow called Guy Jones. His page is composed mainly of footage from numerous early newsreels. The video that caught my attention and which is posted below is of Opening Day of the 1931 major league baseball season at Yankee Stadium. […]

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Nicole Gelinas joins Seth Barron to discuss her research on New York subway ridership, the future of the city’s subways, and the decriminalization of fare-jumping, a reversal of a critical policing strategy that helped fight crime. Subway ridership in New York has nearly doubled since 1977, but it’s not tourists packing the trains: it’s city residents. And New York’s poorest neighborhoods have […]

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