Tag: New Hampshire

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The “Inquisition” of a Christian Nominee in New Hampshire

 

Frank Edelblut’s New Hampshire Commissioner of Education Hearing
Photo credit: Councilor Joe Kenney’s Facebook page.
Frank Edelblut is a New Hampshire businessman and former state representative who ran for governor last year. He lost the Republican primary by 800 votes to Chris Sununu, who went on to win the governorship in November. Governor Sununu has now nominated Edelblut to be the state’s Commissioner of Education. There’s only one problem (for Democrats): Edelblut is a Christian.

During a marathon seven-hour public hearing on Tuesday in Concord, Andru Volinsky, a Democrat, grilled Edelblut about his Christian faith. Volinsky is a freshman member of New Hampshire’s Executive Council, a five-member body that shares some power with the governor and which confirms the governor’s nominees.

The hearing was described as an “inquisition” by Anne Marie Banfield, an education liaison with Cornerstone Action, a New Hampshire think tank.

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I’m getting sued by the Tuftonboro, New Hampshire, board of selectmen (Carolyn Sundquist, Lloyd Wood, and Bill Marcussen) because I made a document request through New Hampshire’s Right to Know law and the selectmen don’t want to comply with the law. So they sued me! Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Sunday morning, December 11, I was awakened to the sound of someone pounding on my front door. I stumbled out of bed and into the entry hall to discover a sheriff’s deputy outside. “The town of Tuftonboro wants you in court for some reason,” he explained. In an effort to squelch the public’s right to […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Glenn Cordelli, New Hampshire State Representative

 
Glenn-Cordelli
NH State Representative Glenn Cordelli

Glenn Cordelli has been knocking on constituent doors for the past month in preparation for the September 13 state primary in New Hampshire. Cordelli is seeking reelection to his third term in the New Hampshire House of Representatives, where he serves on the House Education Committee. “Parents should be in control of their children’s education, not government ‘educrats,’” he says. “Why shouldn’t a parent be able to have their child take an online course, take several classes at the public school, hire a tutor, etc? Put education dollars back into the hands of parents. That is the education reform we need.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. In Praise of the Several States

 

shutterstock_216956542I grew up in northern New Jersey, not far from where Tony Soprano and the gang plied their crooked trade. When my family took vacations, it was to the Jersey Shore. Once or twice a year we’d pile into the station wagon to visit my mother’s parents and their extended clan in Westchester County, New York. We called it “upstate.” It seemed to me and my siblings – some of whom were sitting in the rear-facing backseat – as if we’d crossed over into another country. I don’t know why; only the license plates were different.

With age, I’ve come to realize that our family vacations were essentially local getaways. We weren’t wealthy enough to go on far distant excursions. I went to the Poconos once in high school with some friends to ski. I thought I’d need a passport. When I got older, I spread my wings. My adult years have taken me from sea to shining sea. I lived for a few years in Southern California. I’ve been all across the South, the Midwest, the Great Plains, the Mountain states, and to the Pacific Northwest. I know how unique the regions and cities of this country are. Chicago is dissimilar from New York, which is different than Los Angeles, which is unlike Austin, which makes Boston look like the moon.

I know how special every state is, too, with its own unique character and distinct personality—sometimes more than one. Iced tea tastes different in Georgia than it does in Maine. Snow causes rejoicing in the resort towns of New England; it causes panic in Arkansas. From the redwood forests, to the Gulf Stream waters, this land is as wide and varied as a diner menu. We are a pizza with everything. A person looking for the heart of America could do worse than a grand tour of its state fairs.

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A friend told us that the place we had to go when in New Hampshire, as part of our state by state tour, was the Funspot. It has several sources of fame. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the Funspot Family Fun Center in Laconia, New Hampshire is the largest video arcade in […]

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I checked the delegate counts this morning and Rubio was sitting at 7, the same number he came out of Iowa with. I was under the impression that reaching the 10% threshold in New Hampshire netted at least 1 delegate. Not that it matters in the grand scheme, but I’m curious anyway. What gives? Preview […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. New Hampshire Results: What to Watch For This Evening

 

shutterstock_370485401Here’s an abbreviated version of my earlier argument about how the New Hampshire primary will be spun and what to look for to keep up with the media mavens manipulating the message.

Most eyes will be on Rubio, who won the post-Iowa spin but stumbled during Saturday’s debate (which reminds me of Cruz’s stumbles immediately preceding Iowa, which should provide hope for Rubio supporters). This is fair, because this is Rubio’s moment to overperform.

Where are Trump’s numbers? If he underperforms the polls as he did in Iowa, look for some “trouble ahead” stories.

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I previously commented on my three possible likely scenarios for Iowa and my primary (and preferred) scenario turned out to be true. Cruz won, Trump came in second and Rubio came in Third. I did not expect Rubio to do as well in Iowa as he did and it seems I was not alone in […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Time to Thin the GOP Herd

 

shutterstock_119196472At last, Lindsey Graham did the right thing. After months of increasingly irrelevant undercard debates and poll numbers in the naughts, South Carolina’s littlest senator suspended his campaign. He joins far more promising ex-candidates Rick Perry, Scott Walker, and Bobby Jindal who were unable to capitalize on today’s frustrated electorate.

Reviewing the polling this weekend, it’s past time for several others to follow their lead. Trump is still leading most surveys, Cruz has surged into prominence, and then there’s the amorphous lump of everybody else. Said amorphous lump represents a powerful constituency, as it holds a third of GOP primary voters. But divided among several candidates, these voters will lose out unless several of their current choices step aside.

Let’s face facts, George Pataki: You are not going to be the GOP candidate. The same goes for Rand Paul, John Kasich, Carly Fiorina, Mike Huckabee, and Rick Santorum. You cast your lines, but the fish ain’t biting. It’s time for you to “spend more time with your family,” just in time for Christmas.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Pain and Suffering in New England

 

imageHere in New England, it’s hard to get through a news cycle without at least one mention of the region’s opioid epidemic. Every media outlet covers it; governors are creating task forces faster than you can count; and the presidential candidates expect daily questions on the matter, often from parents who lost a child to an overdose. (Notably, Jeb Bush’s daughter has struggled with addiction for years, and Carly Fiorina’s stepdaughter died of an overdose.)

Is the problem worthy of the hype? More so than I had thought. In Massachusetts last year, there were nearly 1,100 confirmed deaths from opioid poisoning, and that number is likely to crawl higher as some investigations are completed. That’s up from 711 deaths in 2012, which constituted very nearly 30 percent of all accidental deaths in the state. Most depressingly, confirmed overdose deaths have increased every year since 2010, when the number was just 555. New Hampshire has only a fifth as many people as Massachusetts, but almost a third as many fatal cases. These rates are significantly higher than national averages.

Now, statistics like this are only a reflection of reality and often a distorted one: It’s wholly possible that the increase in the number of recorded incidents reflects, at least in part, a growing awareness of such causes of death (when you start looking for things, you tend to find them). Still, that’s a staggering number of deaths, both in absolute numbers and as a proportion of preventable deaths. I’m hesitant to use the word “epidemic” to describe things short of the Spanish Flu, but there’s a undoubtedly a very serious problem here.

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Marco Rubio’s support amongst New Hampshire GOP primary voters has tripled since Septemer, according to a new poll released today by Monmouth University. Rubio now has 13%. According to the same poll, other candidates are essentially static, though Chris Christie’s share in the poll did increase by 3%. Donald Trump remains on top with 26%, […]

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Last night I saw Marco Rubio speak at the same home where I saw Carly Fiorina the previous night. The Rubio event was a slightly grander affair. There was a stage decorated with corn stalks and a large sign as a backdrop. The crowd was about three times larger than Carly’s. (Carly had about 60 […]

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Last evening I attended a Carly Fiorina house party in my town, Bedford, NH. She spoke in the back yard, with a pastoral backdrop and about sixty people watching and listening. She gave her familiar, perfectly memorized, stump speech and then took questions. Questions ranged from ISIS, to veteran’s health care, to Obamacare, to her ability […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Pro-Abortion Maggie Hassan (NH) Running for Senate

 
Maggie Hassan
Pro-abortion Governor Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire is running for Senate.

New Hampshire governor Maggie Hassan (D) announced today she is running for the US Senate against incumbent Kelly Ayotte (R). I’ve been trying for almost two months to get Hassan to say whether or not she has seen the Planned Parenthood abortion videos put out by Center for Medical Progress.