Tag: natural gas

Join Jim and Greg as they assess the news that another classified document was discovered at Biden’s Wilmington, Delaware, home. They also groan as New York Gov. Kathy Hochul plows forward with plans to ban gas appliances or gas hookups in construction in the coming years – even in the face of massive public backlash to the Biden administration’s agenda on gas stoves. Finally, Jim comes ready to mock the latest lefty speech banning into oblivion as the University of Southern California and the State of Michigan decide that “field” – as in “field work” – is racist and offensive to people of color. And just when we thought today’s podcast was over…it wasn’t.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up two good martinis and a very bad one. First, they cheer House Republicans for making good on their promise to pass legislation repealing funding for 87,000 new IRS agents and building a campaign issue against every Democrat who voted against it – which was all of them. They also shudder at the Biden administration’s attempts to demonize gas stoves as increasing the odds of developing asthma and other ailments, but they are glad to see the intense pushback that appears to have forced the government to back down. Jim also notes an annoying and tedious tactic employed by Democrats on issues like this. Finally, they not only wonder about the health of our aviation sector after today’s major computer problem triggered a ground stop across the nation, but are increasingly sure Transportation Sec. Pete Buttigieg is simply not up to the job.

…and Just Like That, the Nord Stream Pipelines Went Kaboom!

 

Last night, the twin pipelines supplying Russian natural gas to Germany blew up.  Specifically, they were both breached below the surface of the Baltic Sea, near Danish and Swedish territorial waters.  Almost certainly sabotage, based both on the time coincidence, and a Swedish seismologist’s estimate that at least 100kg of explosive was used.

This sabotage was not a trivial exercise.  It would presumably require a ROV, large underwater drone and/or a submarine to place the charges accurately.  There’s a limited supply of such equipment and expertise. And it would likely require a large enough team that it will eventually leak, even if there’s no obvious forensic information to be gathered.

Join Jim and Greg as they mostly welcome Elon Musk’s purchase of Twitter and promises of speech protection and dissect why so many on the left are hysterical about this news. They also sigh as Biden climate envoy John Kerry declares war on natural gas and promises it will be dead within 10 years. And they get a kick out of Utah “independent” U.S. Senate candidate Evan McMullin’s empty vow to caucus with neither Republicans nor Democrats if he is elected this year.

 

Nicholas DeIuliis, president and CEO of CNX Resources Corporation, joined “Plugged In” host Neil Chatterjee and energy reporter Breanne Deppisch to break down the global dependence on Russian oil and why — even amid crisis — critics still push back on natural gas and other cleaner energy sources.

Deluliis also touches on the good, the bad, and the ugly of ESG (environmental and social governance) investing and why the industry has shifted focus to advocacy and technology development. He said balancing the goal of making the industry more efficient and adding demand for natural gas and renewables is what it’s all about.

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In 1944, US Treasury secretary Henry Morgenthau proposed that Germany should be permanently prevented from a launching aggressive warfare…by stripping it of its industrial capacity. And in 2022, Germany is has put itself into a position where it is considering the rationing of natural gas.   Preview Open

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On November 23, 2021, Senator Lyin’ Lizzie Warren’s (credit Scott Johnson) office put out an inflation blame diverting press release and sent a letter to a series of named natural gas producers. Surprisingly, one of the named companies refused to be frozen, and responded with publication of a responsive letter to Sen. Warren. This act […]

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Greg and guest host Rob Long celebrate a federal court in Louisiana ending President Biden’s oil and gas lease ban on federal land. They also cringe as the Biden administration considers lifting sanctions on top Iranian institutions which finance terrorism. Lastly, they roll their eyes at California Gov. Gavin Newsom for failing to relinquish his state of emergency powers despite COVID-19 numbers being at all time lows in his state.

Join Jim and Greg as they see plenty of votes lined up to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. They also dig further into Joe Biden’s energy plan and see just how quickly he wants to wipe out fossil fuels. And they wince as Biden literally forgets who he’s running against.

Abundant, Limited Resources

 

This article by Spencer Jakab at the Wall Street Journal leaves me unsure of whether to laugh or rant. I agree with Jakab that the regular burning of unprofitable natural gas at some oil wells is a problem, but for different reasons. First, an introduction:

Even as more and more gas gets supercooled and shipped around the world in expensive, liquefied form, an estimated 5.1 trillion cubic feet of gas was flared world-wide in 2018, according to The World Bank—equivalent to the combined consumption of France, Germany and Belgium.

“Interagency Consensus” DIME Not Worth a Plugged Nickel on NATO

 

NATO at 70Everyone in the vaunted “interagency,” is well aware of the concept of the instruments of national power. The old Army War College acronym is “DIME,” for diplomatic, informational, military, and economic tools. You will notice that each tends to rest primarily in different departments, different agencies in the “interagency.” This would be why you need multiple agencies to coordinate rather than always operating “in their own lane.”

Just as Madison Avenue is best at selling Madison Avenue, so too the permanent bureaucracy and its affiliates, allies, patrons, and petitioners all affirm competent and selfless expertise in the face of all evidence. Indeed, the reverence for the “foreign policy consensus” evokes the British Parliament’s ritual prostration before the NHS. Thank God that we finally have a president who feels no such compulsion, the first such since Ronald Reagan.

H.R. McMasters showed real professionalism in his honchoing of President Trump’s National Security Strategy. He actually ensured the “interagency” worked to produce a coordinated draft that conformed to the Commander in Chief’s clear intent, where “ commander’s intent” is a military term of art for guidance that must be fully supported. This baseline document was actually published within the first year of President Trump’s administration.

Richard Epstein looks at Donald Trump’s recent executive orders on energy and environmental issues, explaining how free-market economics can be reconciled with good environmental stewardship.

The Strategika Podcast: Williamson Murray on the Strategic Implications of America’s Energy Boom

 

WickIn the new series of Strategika podcasts from the Hoover Institution, we’re looking at what the revolution in American energy production means for the US’s economic and strategic future. In this first installment, I talk with Williamson Murray, the Ambassador Anthony D. Marshall Chair of Strategic Studies at The Marine Corps University, about what the implications are for our relationships with Russia, Iran, and other countries in the Middle East. Listen in below or subscribe to Strategika through iTunes or your favorite podcast service.

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Some time ago, March 17th to be precise, Jane’s 360 produced an interesting article on the, then potential, conflict brewing between Russia and the Ukraine. Of the many observations a couple were rather striking: • If Russia were to intervene militarily in eastern Ukraine it would seek to do so rapidly, so as to prevent […]

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