Tag: Native Americans

Book Review: Superior Rendezvous Place

 

The city of Thunder Bay, in northern Ontario near the far western end of Lake Superior, is a curious city when one looks into it. As cities go, the entity is quite young, having only been formed in 1969. But it was formed by the merger of 3 smaller cities, one of which bore the name of Fort William, and Fort William itself had, for a brief moment in time, a crucial role in the settlements of both the Canadian and American interiors. As its name implies, it was initially an actual Fort – a fortified settlement, but not a military one. Fort William was a trading and commercial hub, a deliberate outpost of the same sort of ventures that gained India for Britain. Fort William was the key interior post of the Northwest Company. As with its more famous British contemporaries, the Hudson Bay Company and the East India Company, the NWC’s pursuit of trade in effect claimed much of what today is western Canada. Moreover, much of early American trade either crossed through, or crossed swords with the traders of the NWC. Superior Rendezvous-Place: Fort William in the Canadian Fur Trade, by Jean Morrison, is an approachable history of this settlement, and its significant, if rather brief time as a vital hub of early Canada.

These are 10 man canoes – still much smaller than the big trading canoes.

Superior Rendezvous-Place begins with background history on the discoveries of the interior of North America, French and British explorations, and early commercial networks for shipping manufactured goods in, to barter with the natives in exchange for furs (chiefly beaver), and to then packaged and ship the furs back out to ports, thence to Europe. In the absence of roads, the many lakes and rivers of the Canadian interior were mapped and surveyed for the purpose of the portage – trade routes navigated by crews in massive birch-bark canoes. The French developed their network across what is today lower Canada and Michigan, across the Great Lakes, and from there even further into the interior. The British, by way of the Hudson Bay Company, entered the interior from Hudson Bay. In the 7 Years War (the French and Indian War), France lost Canada, and the Scottish Clan McTavish, eager businessmen, saw an opportunity to replace the old French network with one of their own.

QOTD: Ride onward, hero, into legend

 

“If I should be killed, I want you to bury me on one of the hills east of the place where my grandparents and brothers and sisters and other relatives are buried.”

“If you have a memorial service, I want the soldiers to go ahead with the American Flag. I want cowboys to follow, all on horseback. I want one of the cowboys to lead one of the wildest of the T over X horses with saddle and bridle on.”

Bad Eagle’s Question

 

The late Dr. David Yeagley, a Comanche Indian (traditional name ‘Bad Eagle’) and college professor, described an interaction that took place in one of his classes. (excerpted)

“LOOK, DR. YEAGLEY, I don’t see anything about my culture to be proud of. It’s all nothing. My race is just nothing.”

Code Talkers

 

We are between Armed Forces Day and Memorial Day. The first is a minor holiday intended to honor those serving in our military. The second is a major federal holiday and is intended to commemorate our honored war dead. A recent conversation with a younger veteran led to talk of his grandfathers’ service in World War II, and that in turn led to a broader reflection on a seldom remembered or only partially understood group of Americans in the two world wars.

The younger veteran’s Hopi grandfather was a tank mechanic. His Navaho grandfather was a code talker in the Marine Corps. As we talked, I mentioned recently learning of the original WWI code talkers, a small team of Choctaw Indians in the American Expeditionary Forces. The Native American veteran replied that there were Hopi and other tribes also used as code talkers in WWII. It is just that the Navajos were the largest group and became the center of historical attention.

A brief exploration of this little known history revealed that I had missed the recent passing of Navajo Code Talker Fleming Begaye, Sr.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for January 23, 2019 number 209 it is the Indigenous Billionaires edition of the podcast (yeah, we’re not exactly sure what that means either). We are your poor but proud hosts, radio guy Todd Feinburg and AI guy Mike Stopa and we come to you every week with the scintillating discussion of the issues of the day that – we’re not kidding here – you’re just not going to find anywhere else.

This we we have two topics…That’s no surprise; we have two topics every week. We will discuss the intellectual and economic (and moral!) foundation of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ argument that we’d all be more virtuous if we just took a boatload more money from the filthy rich and then gave it to the poor. Why is it that the ideas of the free market that (in case you haven’t noticed) brought the world untold prosperity are after all so hard to grasp? We discuss.

Member Post

 

Scenes from the idyllic world that Christopher Columbus destroyed: “During his first voyage to the Americas in 1492, Christopher Columbus heard about the fierce Kalinago people of the Caribbean‘s Lesser Antilles islands. Documents from the 15th and 16th centuries reveal that the Kalinago traveled hundreds of miles in their war canoes to attack other islands […]

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Los Angeles Says, “Goodbye, Columbus”

 

Today the Los Angeles City Council voted 14-1 to replace the celebration of Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. Thus, Los Angeles joins a number of other progressive cities including Phoenix, Portland, Seattle, Denver, Minneapolis, Berkeley, and Santa Cruz in kicking Christopher Columbus to the curb in favor of indigenous peoples. The Los Angeles effort was led by Councilman Mitch O’Farrell who is a proud member of the Wyandotte tribe.

I must admit I don’t fully understand the infantile fascination and celebration by progressives of societies and peoples described variously as Native American, Indigenous Peoples, Indians (politically incorrect) or Pre-Columbian Americans (PCA’s) as some sort of numinous people. Mr O’Farrell in making the case for this change stated the following;

“Christopher Columbus’ legacy of extreme violence, enslavement, and brutality is not in dispute. Nor is the suffering, destruction of cultures, and subjugation of Los Angeles’ original indigenous people, who were here thousands of years before anyone else”.

DOJ Was Right to End the Battle Against the Redskins

 

Great news for football fans, free speech warriors, and 90 percent of Native Americans: Due to a recent Supreme Court ruling, the Trump administration has ended Obama’s silly attack on the Washington Redskins.

The Justice Department sent a letter to a federal appeals court Wednesday afternoon conceding that a Supreme Court decision last week in favor of an Asian-American band calling itself “The Slants” means that the NFL’s Redskins will prevail in the battle over efforts to cancel the team’s trademarks on the grounds that the name is disparaging to Native Americans.

Member Post

 

I encourage you to read this “Impromptus” by Jay Nordlinger, on the topic of life on “Indian reservations.” (I use scare quotes because neither Indians nor reservations today resemble their predecessors.) I am embarrassed to admit that I was completely unaware of the rampant child abuse that occurs on reservations. And I am not just talking […]

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Member Post

 

It was our 7th day out as dawn broke on the westernmost camp we would make on this trip. Rapid City may be South Dakota’s 2nd largest city, but with under 80,000 people it seems hardly to qualify as a city by the standards of anything east of the Mississippi. Yet it showed something I […]

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[Coulter]’s from Connecticut, & she’s very upset about immigrants. I’m willing to lend a sympathetic ear to people from Connecticut when it comes to immigrants — if they happen to own a tribal casino! My feeling is, unless you’re Native American, you should just shut up about this. ‘Cause you ain’t from here. That’s the […]

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Member Post

 

I just finished Day 2 of a multi-day ride to my birthplace home in North Dakota. Much of Day 1 (I didn’t get started until about 2pm) was spent riding on roads I had never before been on in the White Earth Reservation – roads that turned out to be very good shape for bicycling […]

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