Tag: music

A Moment in Time

 

I’m not a fan of the Disney Parks. I think they are contrived fantasy (yes, there is legitimate fantasy), overly expensive, and boring. But there are simple moments in life when you have the chance to see into a father-daughter relationship: adoration, pride and beauty, demonstrated in a few sweet moments. I hope you enjoy this video as much as I do.

An Unexpected Gift of Speech

 

https://ametia.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/dr-martin-luther-king-i-have-a-dream-speech4.jpgIn the American government’s secular liturgical calendar, February is African-American History Month, and March is Women’s History Month. The subjects of these two observances converge in a historical event we think we know, but which actually was an unexpected gift to the nation: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Over the years, the secularist left has not only erased King’s religious identity, they have also blotted out her-story. She was uncompromisingly faithful to her Lord and Savior in her music, so the leftists hated her words then and buried herstory.

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

The 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom marked the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and was driven by the long series of unfulfilled promises and setbacks since that moment. Martin Luther King, Jr. was not a senior leader in the civil rights movement, but recognized as a powerful younger voice. The impetus for the march, then, came from A. Philip Randolph, who founded the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and who had driven limited concessions with a threatened march on Washington twenty years earlier.

Member Post

 

If International Conflicts were settled with dance-offs, South Korea would be a Global Superpower. (Some of those boys could use a sammitch, though.) I’ll give Japan the overall edge on music, though. (“Sweet Devil” is absolutely infectious.) Chinese pop music has a certain quality I can’t put my finger on; almost as if it’s a […]

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A Calico Christmas

 

Spending my teenage years growing up in Laredo, TX, was not a particularly easy or pleasant experience. Amongst the many annoyances one had to deal with in a culturally isolated South Texas border town was a lack of quality English-language programming on the radio. If you weren’t into silly bubble-gum pop or a multitude of Spanish-language musical genres, you were out of luck. Thus, I had to rely heavily on AM radio stations broadcasting from San Antonio, some 150 miles up I-35.

Among the ones I listened to most were KTSA 550-AM, a talk radio station (on which I would discover a dynamic young conservative talk show host named Rush Limbaugh in June 1991) and KKYX 680-AM, a country music station that every Friday featured a college football program hosted by then-Texas Tech head coach William “Spike” Dykes.

While listening to the latter in December 1990, a beautiful, sentimental song was played over and over again. The name of the song was “Calico Christmas.” It had wonderful lyrics, telling the story of a soldier stationed overseas who was missing Christmas in his Texas hometown, dreaming of his bride in her favorite calico dress. It received a lot of airplay likely because hundreds of thousands of American troops had been recently deployed to Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield. War was imminent, and no doubt the song helped sooth the angst of many on the home front.

Tales from the Tabloids: Playing Piano for Retired Blind Elephants

 

A British fellow named Paul Barton lives in Thailand where his wife runs an animal sanctuary, Elephants World, for “old, sick, abused, retired or rescued elephants.” As their website says, “Most of our elephants have lived very hard lives and they come here to retire in peace.” Some years ago he began playing his piano to the elephants, some of whom were in chronic pain or blind or both.

Here’s Paul with Romsai, the nearly blind old bull elephant, playing Beethoven:

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Today President Trump signed H.R. 1551, the “Orrin G. Hatch – Bob Goodlatte Music Modernization Act”. Present are Kid Rock, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter (Doobie Brothers, Steely Dan), Mike Love (The Beach Boys), Sam Moore (Sam & Dave), John Rich, and members of MercyMe. Preview Open

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I co-host an alternative music radio show and podcast called Suburban Underground (it’s on all the podcast apps, FYI. Here’s the iTunes link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/suburban-underground/id1173099110?mt=2). My co-host (a former Ricochet member) and I have been thinking a lot about the accusations of cultural appropriation being lobbed from time to time at various artists, most hilariously at Bruno […]

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The band XTC was, of course, uber-left socialist as all British artists, performers, and journalists are by national custom. I am certain when they wrote their 1982 single “The Ballad of Peter Pumpkinhead,” they were imagining a (literally) Marxist Politician who would try to bring about socialist utopia by vanquishing the church and the capitalist establishment. […]

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Fifty More Ways to Leave Your Lover

 

Does the song “Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lover” annoy you? Good. There’s nothing like hate to get the creative juices flowing. Back in 1975, maybe it was edgy to hint that you were such a lover you needed to plan 50 escapes from your latest (no doubt cis-het) tryst. But these days? Bah. Much more creativity is required to extricate oneself from postmodern affairs of the heart. So…

Here are just a few new reasons for leaving your lover. Can you top them?

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This popped up on my social media yesterday: Yes, that is Lynda Carter from the “Wonder Woman” TV show singing and dancing with KISS, who appear to have had a Bob Mackie makeover (which, in fact, they did). Everything about that clip SCREAMS 70’s disco trash, but it’s from a one-off special she did in […]

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Music and the Imagination

 

Music can spark our imagination. My sixth grade music teacher once came in with a recording of some symphonic Rachmaninoff and instructed us to take out our notebooks or looseleaf paper and write whatever came into our heads as we listened. I wasn’t sure what to expect since she didn’t tell us in advance what we were about to hear, but I remember feeling shocked as the sound crashed into me and then I began to write, and words flowed from my pen onto the paper as the music swept me away.

Music can also create emotion in the listener. We all can think of the power of a favorite song or classical recording. Have you ever been watching a television show or movie when you realized the only sense of suspense or excitement was coming, not from the plot or the scene or the actors, but from the music? The composer attempts to use this instant link to our brains to convey something to us, often successfully, even when the rest of the input does not support that idea.

Eurovision 2019: The Hip Hop Beat of the Mideast Conflict

 

Two weeks ago, the organizers of the Eurovision Song Contest, made a startling announcement: The contest rules which have been in place for six decades should apply … unless, of course, a singer from Israel wins the contest …. and then, well, we need to rethink the matter.

Because an Israeli singer, Netta Barzilai, did in fact win the contest in Lisbon in mid-May, the European broadcasters had a dilemma: Follow the contest’s long-standing rules, or develop and apply a new, special set of rules that only apply to Israel.

To understand the controversy, and how it provides a view into the wider public diplomacy challenges that Israel faces each day, some background is needed.

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Memorial Day: Meaning and Memory The last Monday of May is Memorial Day in America. How does this differ from Veterans’ Day, or other patriotic holidays? Why do we have both Memorial and Veterans’ Day? How ought we to observe the day? If you are looking for music for the occasion, how might you distinguish […]

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