Tag: mortgages

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned

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Member Post

 

I would never suggest eliminating this deduction because it deprives the government of $70 billion in tax receipts. That argument could be made for just about any part of current tax law. I could say, for example, that because the top bracket is capped at XX % and should be 5% higher, that low ceiling deprives the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Reagan Had It Backwards

 

Ronald Reagan famously said: “[G]overnment’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”

I think Reagan had the order wrong. From Bloomberg News:

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