Tag: minimum wage

Homeland Insecurity

 

Welcome friends and lovers to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast number 219. (Whoa Nellie!) It is the Homeland Insecurity edition of the show with your rock-solid hosts radio guy Todd Feinburg and AI guy Mike Stopa. This week, rumblings (at last) in the department of homeland security and Kirstjen Nielsen is (at last!) out, out, OUT!!! She of the Bush ideology, the foot dragging, love-those-dreamers persuasion. And now in charge (for the moment) it appears to be the Red Cross Knight Stephen Miller. Is it possible that the Trump Administration is finally going to actually get serious about the issue that won him the White House? Hope so.

Then, we discuss the Dems plan for a nationwide $15 minimum wage. Oh how jolly. I’m sure that will go over really big in Mississippi. Good luck.

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Last week, I posted a story that I heard on the local TV news about how Walmart Greeters are being eliminated. It was a sad story about a senior, who also happened to be a veteran, at the local Walmart in the next county who was soon to be an eliminated greeter. This lead to […]

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There’s been a lot of media buzz and debate this week over Amazon’s decision to raise its internal minimum wage to $15 an hour for its 250,000 regular workers and 100,000 seasonal hires here in the United States. Conversations are flying back and forth about the long and short-term economic impact. Will this force higher […]

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Dennis Prager on the Self-Righteously Suicidal West and False Morality

 

For this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast, I had nationally syndicated radio host, columnist, author of numerous books, teacher, film producer and co-founder of PragerU, Dennis Prager, on the podcast to discuss among other things:

  • How Dennis Prager ended up a conservative as an Ivy League-educated Jewish intellectual from Brooklyn, New York — contrary to so many of his peers
  • How perceptions of human nature divide Left and Right
  • Whether government has filled the void of religion for the increasingly secular and progressive American coasts
  • How the good intentions that underlie Leftist policy prescriptions lead to horrendous outcomes — and emotion versus reason on the Left and Right
  • The false morality underlying European immigration policy with respect to the Muslim world, and Prager’s criticism of Jewish support of mass immigration consisting disproportionately of Jew-haters
  • The self-righteous suicidalism of the West
  • The Leftist bias of social media platforms and PragerU’s legal battle with YouTube/Google

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found, download the episode directly here or read the transcript here.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America give credit to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for countering Democratic demands for a million pages of documents on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh by suggesting the Senate vote on him may come just days before the election. They also mourn the impending loss […]

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Long-term, persistent joblessness is the great American domestic crisis of our generation. In our 2017 special issue, “The Shape of Work to Come,” City Journal grappled with the problem, and our writers continue to explore it. City Journal recently convened a panel of experts to talk about the future of work. Audio from their discussion is featured in this episode of 10 Blocks. […]

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Starting on Jan 1 2018, the minimum wage of Ontario was increased by $2.40 to a even $14.00 per hour. As a result cut backs are occurring: More

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This week on Banter, Dr. Michael Strain discussed a variety of hot topics, including immigration, minimum wage laws, and the significance of the U.S. Census. Dr. Strain is the director of economic policy studies at AEI. His research focuses on labor economics, public finance, and social policies. Several of his papers have been published in […]

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New Study Finds that Minimum Wage Hikes are Great News for Robot Workers

 

Back in 2014, I wrote a post that asked, “Why are minimum wage proponents dismissing automation risk?” I just wasn’t getting a sense from the “Fight for 15” crowd that it had thought much about the possibility that dramatically raising the minimum wage might worsen the competitive position of low-skill humans versus machines.

Or maybe it had, but the politics were so tantalizing that they took precedence over sound policy. My conclusion back then: “Pushing for an unprecedented boost in the minimum wage given both the weak economy and automation risk seems like foolhardy public policy.” That, especially given the low-risk alternative of raising and expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit.

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Andy Puzder on Withdrawing as Labor Secretary

 

Andy PuzAndy Puzder joined us at Freedom Fest to discuss the minimum wage, small business regulations, his withdrawal from his Labor Secretary nomination, the poignant discussion he had with Mike Pence, and his last marketing effort at Carl’s Jr., creating possibly one of the greatest commercials in modern times (video below).

In February 2017, fast-food executive Andy Puzder withdrew his nomination to be Labor Secretary as the White House realized the CEO of CKE Restaurants would go down in defeat due to infighting even on the Republican side of Congress. Only a couple of days following the termination of Mike Flynn, seeing one of President Trump’s cabinet picks walking away was a victory for Democrats, unions, and liberal groups. The New York Times attacked Mr. Puzder’s business record and, more importantly to Andy, his character. Mr. Puzder said his treatment had been “an unprecedented smear campaign.” Democrats vocally lauded Mr. Puzder’s withdrawal as “a victory for working Americans.” Many Conservatives were dismayed as Mr. Puzder, while running both Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s, staunchly opposed the Affordable Care Act, spoke out against the Progressives’ effort to increase the minimum wage to $15, and overtime rules. The unions despised his policies and made it personal.

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St. Louis Embraces Basic Economics and Lowers Minimum Wage

 

I’ve often highlighted the economic insanity of massive minimum wage hikes and the jobs lost as a result. But one Midwestern city is going the other direction. No, the mayor and aldermen of St. Louis didn’t decide to take an Economics 101 class at their local community college; the state government forced their second largest city back to sanity.

In 2015, the city raised its minimum wage from the state level of $7.70 an hour to $10. The Republican-dominated legislature passed a law mandating that all cities adhere to the Missouri standard. It goes into effect on Aug. 28.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss reports that President Trump revealed very sensitive intelligence during his meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. They also get a kick out of a lawsuit against the Democratic National Committee, alleging staffers weren’t paid the current minimum wage for their work in […]

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Much of the reason Conservatives and Libertarians have trouble making any headway with sound economic policy is one of framing. Someone says they want to reduce or even simply not raise the minimum wage and suddenly they are “anti-poor,” or something. The two main reasons liberals have the upperhand are “social desirability bias” and “diffuse […]

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Rick Berman: Thank You for Voting

 

How would you feel being labeled “Dr. Evil” in USA Today, which is then repeated across national media including a 60 Minutes interview? When you fight against drinking and driving laws, smoking regulations, tanning bed restrictions, motorcycle helmet laws, minimum wage increases and of course unions, you can be called many things and for the most part none of them kind. Meet Rick Berman, a lobbyist public affairs advocate whose successful firm Berman and Company most recently worked for the Trump Campaign (after working for Ted Cruz during the primary). If you haven’t seen the 2006 movie Thank You For Smoking (trailer below) you missed one of Hollywood’s better films detailing (in a humorous and entertaining way) free speech, individual choice, and libertarian philosophy. It’s been said the movie, based on Christopher Buckley’s book of the same name, portrays Rick Berman who has testified before numerous committees of various state legislatures, the Senate and the House of Representatives. In this interview we discuss the issues Rick’s firm works on to “change the debate,” his role in the 2016 election, and the media hits he’s taken (and welcomes) including four straight nights of being attacked on Rachel Maddow’s program to which he responded by flying up on his own dime and defending himself on live television.

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They recently installed self-serve kiosks in my local McDonalds, where I dine far more often than I probably should. So far, I’ve eaten there four times since the machines were installed and I haven’t noticed a reduction in staff, merely a mighty improvement in service. More

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Welcome to OppCast

 

In the inaugural episode of OppCast, hosts John Hart and Ellen Carmichael break down how the current state of American society led to the crazy political year of 2016. Plus: Opportunity Lives contributor Patrick Brennan joins to discuss an innovative fix to the controversial minimum wage increase.

OppCast is a weekly podcast from Opportunity News Media that cracks through the surface of political commentary to reveal the people and passions behind the headlines. Amidst all the negativity in today’s media, we strive to focus on the positive stories in American politics: the doers, the reformers, the people who are making an impact both in Washington DC and your own community.

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#FightFor15, Meet Your Robot Replacements

 
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Marie Kanger Born / Shutterstock.com

The push to increase the minimum wage is mostly a phenomenon among Democrats, with labor and other affiliated groups loudly pushing the Twitter hashtag #FightFor15, or a minimum wage of $15. Democratic governors and mayors, who have mostly failed their constituencies, have been eager to sign legislation greatly hiking the minimum wage, much to the delight of their union overlords at SEIU and the AFL-CIO.

This, of course, makes no sense to me as a conservative. I am a big believer in capitalism. The market should dictate prices, and companies should decide how much to pay employees. Governments do nothing but throw up roadblocks to success, stifle innovation, and destroy businesses, large and small. Governments also have no idea how to run a successful business. For proof, I give you the Postal Service.

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Would Subsidizing Jobs Be More Conservative than the Minimum Wage?

 

shutterstock_126940808One of the problems of working is that I often I miss interesting posts and comments on Ricochet. One of them was @katebraestrup’s Free Money! No Strings Attached from April which discussed the guaranteed basic income as an alternative to the welfare state. I’ve been thinking about welfare reform — specifically, about the new pushes for minimum wage — but wonder if there isn’t an approach that might be more in-keeping with conservative views. Mind you, everything that follows I’ve phrased in relative terms; I’m offering what I hope is a least-worst alternative, not an ideal one. So, let’s begin with what I regard as the inherent dishonesty of the minimum wage:

  1. It presupposes that any occupation, if plied for eight hours a day (why not six or ten) provides social value equal to a living wage.
  2. Since the costs of the minimum wage are generally passed onto consumers, it represents a hidden tax on those buying goods and services from companies hire minimum wage employees.
  3. Companies subject to minimum wage requirements often compete with foreign competitors who are, of course, not subject to our laws. This makes the minimum wage an internal tariff on domestic labor.
  4. The minimum wage also acts as a tariff on labor as compared to automation. Thus, apart from the supply/demand effects (higher price lowers demand, i.e., jobs), an increase in the minimum wage increases the incentive to automate jobs.
  5. It provides an incentive to hirer illegal immigrants.

But real and harmful as these effects are on workers and consumers, this overlooks the harm minimum wage laws cause employers. First, the laws imply that employers are too tight-fisted to treat their employees fairly without government intervention. Second, it imposes all the burdens of implementing a minimum wage on the employer (whether to raise prices, whose job to eliminate, cajoling supervisors and middle managers to stay on without a raise to help absorb the wage increase, etc.).

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Avoid Ron Unz, entrepreneur and former Gubernatorial candidate who writes about his minimum wage activism here, in a section on his “top issues”: http://www.unz.com/runz/unz-on-the-issues/#raising-the-minimum-wage More

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It seems people don’t respond well to having their options reduced. Imagine that. But CEO Bob Merritt tells investors that “customers and staff spoke very loudly,” and that “a lot of them voted with their feet.” Customer research apparently showed that nearly 60 percent of patrons disliked the tipless model, which increased menu prices by 12 to 15 […]

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