Tag: millenials

What do young liberals think of the Democratic presidential candidates? How did a Cincinnati restaurant employee end up as a D.C. reporter? Does anyone trust Pete Buttigieg (who’s over 30, by the way)? Jack invites Timmy Broderick, his friend of many years and now a reporter at the Christian Science Monitor, to discuss what Timmy’s young liberal friends think of the Democratic field (aside from not trusting Buttigieg), and what drove them to leave their mutual hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio and come to Washington in the first place.

Mitchell Sunderland is a freelance writer (Vice, Adult, Penthouse) known for his nuanced profiles on everyone from Stormy Daniels to Mike Tyson, Anne Coulter, Nick Jonas and more. His stories are insane, from growing up the son of one of the largest dog breeders in Florida and dealing with protestors for most of his childhood, to being banned from a gay safe space in college (he’s gay), to being the first American named to the 50 most hated people at Oxford list. He has profiled eclectic groups of people living at the Sausage Castle in Florida and the Bunny Ranch in Vegas. He and Bridget discuss why marketing something as only “representation matters” in the media can turn people off, why a lot of dog breeders don’t like Trump, how you can’t control what people think about you, and how you choose whether or not you’re a victim. It’s a wild ride.

**Warning** This episode is not for the easily offended and more explicit than usual

Trying to solve the mystery of why kids these days are so unhappy, Jack enlists the help of leading purveyor of charts and Washington Free Beacon staff writer Charles Fain Lehman.

“Majority” Politics: The “Kids” Are Alright

 

Are state and Congressional Republicans playing into Democrats’ hands once again, helping Democrats realize their vision of a permanent electoral majority coalition of people herded into identity groups? Is there any good reason to abandon and alienate the youngest, newest segment of voters? Would we do better to treat all competent adults as adults, whose support we would like in 2020?

Current politics and culture feature contradictory claims about young people. On the one hand, we are considering treating young adults as wards of the state (free college for all). These young people are being encouraged to live in a state of emotional fragility, fearful of a discouraging word. On the other hand, the same politicians are suggesting the voting age should be lowered to 16 and modern children’s crusades should be taken seriously (gun-grabbers and anthropogenic catastrophic climate change).

A Census Bureau study of 2018 midterm turn-out shows a significant change by the youngest voters:

Millenials Get Their Feelings Hurt

 

The Biscuits baseball team, the Tampa Bay Rays’ Double-A affiliate, sponsored a clever satire of millennials last week. The team offered a Millennials Night with avocado burgers, napping and selfie stations, and participation ribbons for everyone who came. Naturally, the agenda caused a backlash, with coverage on Twitter and several news outlets.

Mind you, most of the team is manned with millenials, and they thought the theme was funny. The reaction by millennials in the area was mixed, to say the least, which only demonstrates the perception that they have no sense of humor. Melissa Warnke, vice president of the Public Relations Council of Alabama had this to say:

From a PR professional’s perspective, they’re kind of accomplishing what all of us want to accomplish, and that is people talking about your organization, not only here locally, but it’s got a lot of reach outside of our own community, outside of our state as well.

In this, the debut episode of the Young Americans (we changed the name from “Young Folks” after recording), Jack Butler, of the Remnant with Jonah Goldberg, and his youthful interlocutors justify their podcast to a candid world, debate whether young people have to move to big cities to succeed in life, and wonder whether Incredibles 2 is yet another example of Hollywood’s nostalgia- and laziness-driven reliance on sequels.

Satan’s Devices

 

I’m still unhappy about what happened in church Sunday. We were following the sermon–an encouraging and faith building teaching session on how God uses the seemingly small and mundane incidents in our lives to further His own ends. Then someone’s phone dinged once. I felt irritated, but it was once. Then it dinged again. And then again. Not really loud, but enough to be a distraction.

I’m thinking, Really? Can’t you just shut that off for a little while? Is it that hard? (I had switched mine to vibrate right before church.) Then it just kept up with clusters of chimes throughout the service. I turned around slightly trying to figure out who it might be. I thought I had her pegged, a young woman who appeared to be openly texting in church. Mentally, I made a list of options for her: put it on vibrate, take it outside, or wait until later. I tried to imagine what could be so important that one had to carry on a text conversation right there. A medical emergency of some sort? Still, come on.

My younger daughter leaned over and asked if it was me. Nope, I had turned my sound off. People are something else. But I started to feel uneasy. When it was time to stand up, I picked up my purse and subtly checked my phone. Oh, horrors — there was a string of messages on the display. From my sister. I checked the switch. Instead of turning the sound off before church, I had turned it on. It had already been on vibrate from earlier that day. Sigh. My sister had chosen that morning to have a big group exchange with family members. About the weather in California, primarily, with bonus screenshot of the night’s temperature report from my little brother.

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From PC Gamer:  According to SuperData, there’s now a bigger audience for gaming video than the combined audiences of HBO, Netflix, ESPN, and Hulu. For reference, Netflix’s subscriber count is somewhere near 100 million, while Hulu maintains about 12 million. For better or for worse, PewDiePie alone has over 54 million YouTube subscribers. [….] Preview […]

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“La La Land” Is This Generation’s Love Story and It Is Profoundly Sad

 

Warning: This piece is one big, fat spoiler. Sorry. Go see the movie, it’s great!

The movie La La Land begins with a two-song introduction to the mindset of young nobodies who go to Hollywood, dreaming of making it big. “Someone in the Crowd” says “Do what you gotta do until someone notices you.” We’re introduced to two characters who are doing exactly that, with no evidence of success. Mia is an aspiring actress who works in a coffee shop on a movie lot. Sebastian is a pianist with dreams of revitalizing jazz music. In the meantime, he plays humiliating gigs of trite Christmas carols and an 80s cover band.

As their relationship deepens, they encourage each other toward success. Sebastian encourages Mia to not only write a play but to self-produce her one-woman show at a local theater. Mia encourages Sebastian toward his dream of opening a jazz club and suggests a few revisions. However, Sebastian joins a pop band led by an old friend and Mia’s show flops.

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Allegedly, plastic surgeons are getting lots of business these days from millennials looking to fix the idiotic impulsive holes they’ve put in their ears/noses/heads/etc: “There has been an influx of people, millennials in particular, who have a lot of body piercings — mainly facial piercings — that they are looking to change,” says Dr. Laurence […]

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The standard line is that the rising cost of post-secondary education is saddling millenial grads with unmanageable mountains of debt. Now, while it’s true that the cost of post-secondary education has risen way faster than the rate of inflation, and that students are taking on debt to pay for it all, it’s also true that […]

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After the closing of my little construction company at the end of 2013, I was fortunate to find work as the CFO of a local, private group of companies. It was a typically messy situation, run on checkbook balances, accounting and finances unreliable, inaccurate, misleading and chronically behind. There was some nominal book-cooking going on, […]

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I was talking today with someone who works for a major oil corporation here in Houston. She was telling me that her company recently invited many of its employees to a presentation in which differences between generations were discussed. The generations identified in the study were Matures (65+), Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millenials (sometimes […]

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I hire people for well-paying jobs.  These are jobs that require college degrees, preferably advanced ones.   Naturally the first place I look is Harvard, Stanford, Yale, etc., right?  Wrong.  I am more interested in skill-set, experience, and personality than alma mater.    Preview Open

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