Tag: Military

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

A conversation with a friend recently (@bossmongo) about what happened to the Special Forces soldiers in Niger prompted me to write this. If you saw the MSM coverage of the event you’d have thought our highly trained Green Berets wandered into indian country and subsequently were ambushed in a one-sided fight. Appreciatively our own Daily […]

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Recorded on September 26, 2017

After nearly a quarter of a century of the same approach—diplomacy, sanctions, and concessions—the United States seems out of policy options other than a military solution with regard to North Korea . Michael Auslin, Hoover’s inaugural Williams-Griffis Fellow in Contemporary Asia, discusses what scenarios may unfold on the Korean peninsula as well as the possibility of nuclear engagement and nuclear accidents.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Hey, I Got an Idea…”: Part 2

 

I pondered on this experience sipping my Knob Creek Whiskey and reading through the comments from Part 1. It seems some are familiar with the Fulton Extraction System. It was used in the 1965 James Bond classic Thunderball  while the erstwhile Bond embraces yet another beauty during the whole thing, apparently no harness needed for her (easy-peasy lemon-squeezy).

Again seen in one of my personal favorites The Green Berets in order to extract a high level POW — if you watch closely it might be Fritz (or his cousin Franz). The Black Knight had yet another rendition of it and at least he strapped in his passenger (but I am sure Bruce Wayne’s model far exceeds the lowest bidder US government model — private industry ya’ know). And I have even read there is a version in a video game called Metal Gear that you earn points for but not nearly as many cool points I will give you for going live though. I heard a funny on the radio that said “real” reality should be tried in lieu of virtual reality — ain’t that the truth.

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A few days ago I raised the question of Is There a Grand Strategy for the Current War? It was not a rhetorical question. I was hoping to provoke some strategic analysis of what the US is facing. The best response was a proposal that sounded like a bunch of Special Forces operations in countries […]

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After reading JGWs My First Jump story outstandingly describing what it is like parachuting with US Army, I started ruminating on my own military experiences that might be of interest to the Ricochetti and arrived here. Just a note: Hat tip to all of you prolific writers out there, I had to break this into two […]

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In this AEI Events Podcast, Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC) joins AEI’s Thomas Donnelly for a discussion of the ongoing military readiness crisis and what Congress can do to begin addressing it. The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Readiness, Rep. Wilson describes how the series of cuts to the national defense budget under President Obama severely damaged the US military, eroding its ability to perform all the tasks we ask of it.

Rep. Wilson speaks about the serious threats facing the country, focusing in particular on Russia, North Korea, and China, and the importance of US leadership in facing those challenges. Consistent American engagement in foreign affairs, he emphasizes, enabled democracies and free markets to flourish in Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and around the world, but that peace and prosperity is possible only through American military superiority. To reclaim and sustain that superiority, Rep. Wilson calls for Congress and the administration to support the higher defense budget proposed by the chairmen of the House and Senate Armed Services Committees. With persistence and steady leadership, he believes that the US can rebuild its military.

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Dateline: Somewhere in the Desert Private Kenny Schnozzola is one happy soldier. In an interview with this reporter, he says, “Joining the army was the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I was born with my dad’s big nose. I mean it was a real honker. But all my life, I’d identified as Rob […]

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For those who might not recognize it, “Fort Arnold” is the setting of the movie “Stripes,” the 1981 Bill Murray & Harold Ramis classic. “Classic” might seem a bit of a stretch, but any movie that makes as much of a contribution to the wider culture as “Stripes” cannot be considered anything but a classic. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Nose Art and the Spirit of Our Military

 

The current establishment art world cultivates insularity and isolation as a means to prop up the vapid, dysfunctional art they favor. From sterile white box galleries to haughty elitist attitudes, lots of effort is poured into erecting barriers to separate the experience of art from the despised masses and the realities of life.

But art does not exist to be plaything for decadent crypto-Marxist hipsters. It is a vital outpouring of the human soul, a visual method of spiritual communication. Art can take on surprising and spontaneous forms in the strangest places to remind us of who we really are.

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Salena Zito talks to Sean Parnell: Army Ranger, combat infantryman with the elite 10th Mountain Division, and veteran of 485 days of fierce fighting along the Afghan-Pakistan border. Parnell’s unique leadership skills welded his platoon into one of the most fierce and effective American fighting units in modern military history. What is life like for active-duty military and young veterans in Trump’s America?

Salena Zito’s “Main Street Meets The Beltway” comes to you every Thursday on the Examining Politics podcast, and is a joint production of the Washington Examiner and SiriusXM Radio.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. George

 

George was 77, going on 78 when we met. He owned a firm that rather suddenly had become my client due to an emergency failure in their IT network – an emergency that lasted 20 years. A protégé of George’s at the firm would end-up becoming one of my best friends – a relationship that will last forever.

George was remarkable: full-bird Colonel on General Patton’s staff, DoD project manager for the implementation of the world’s first mainframe computer, editor of a military journal for decades, college teacher, business owner, founder of the Pachyderms – a group of folks with thick skins, a sense of humor, and a keen interest in politics and bourbon.

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I learned something recently which I find very worrisome. North Korea has submarine-launched ballistic missiles. Now, the US has very sophisticated anti-sub defenses. Doctrine says an aircraft carrier battle group is impenetrable by subs. Nonetheless, a Chinese sub managed to surface quite unexpectedly, within torpedo range of the USS Kitty Hawk. The possibility that a […]

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It’s been a long eight years of suffering under a commander in chief who hated us and the country. Obama’s picture was to come down after he vacated the office of Friday, but not everyone has received Trump’s official photo yet. Some bases are taking it upon themselves to use memes from the Internet as […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Christmas Spirit

 

I’ve been hauling quite a bit of freight throughout the Mid South region in recent weeks. Its during the inevitable long stretches of road that the mind wanders. The highway crosses the landscape, curving lazily around clumps of forest shaped like giant evergreen puzzle pieces. The sun’s descent toward the horizon is punctuated with an amazing array of fluorescent pink and orange hues on the clouds overhead — an artful touch from the palate of God.

Classical Christmas music fills the truck, much of it consisting of man’s finite attempt to understand and reflect that which is infinite. They call it, “the Christmas spirit,” a phrase I’ve heard since I was a child, back when it seemed more contagious. Lately though, it seems easier to catch a cold. Why is that?

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Connecting Actors and Soldiers

 

Here’s a surprise that popped up in YouTube’s recommended videos: Adam Driver (aka Kylo Ren) talking about his transition from United States Marine to Hollywood actor. Driver’s speech is only 9 minutes (half the video) and impressive in more ways than one. In a rapid-fire presentation, he touches on differences between military life and civilian life while also noting similarities between soldiering and acting.

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I don’t normally post things such as this, but I wanted to share my own thoughts on current events. This is something that, given that yesterday was the Marine Corps birthday and today is a Veterans Day, has been rolling around in my head since Tuesday. I’ve been watching with some dismay, the reaction of […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Uncommon Knowledge: Kori Schake On Civil-Military Relations

 

In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Hoover Institution fellow Kori Schake talks with me about her book Warriors and Citizens that she coauthored with General James Mattis, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of maintaining a world-class military managing worldwide issues with an all-volunteer force.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Death of Discipline

 

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We’ve all been caught up in conversations about the state of America. The focus is often about materialism, decadence, anti-religious activity and denigration of this country. One aspect of the American value system that has suffered major damage is the lack of understanding of and appreciation for the characteristic of self-discipline. The loss of self-discipline has been devastating to the integrity and health of our society.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Pentagon Politics and The B-58 Blunder

 

“The B-58 Blunder” by George Holt, Jr.The B-58 Hustler was a breakthrough aircraft. The first generation of US Air Force jet-powered bombers — i.e., the B-47 medium and B-52 heavy bombers — were revolutionary for their time, but became increasingly vulnerable to high-performance interceptor aircraft and anti-aircraft missiles on the deep penetration bombing missions for which they were intended. In the 1950s, it was believed the best way to reduce the threat was to fly fast and at high altitude, with a small aircraft that would be more difficult to detect with radar.

Preliminary studies of a next generation bomber began in 1949 and, in 1952, Convair was selected to develop a prototype of what would become the B-58. Using a delta wing and four turbojet engines, the aircraft could cruise at up Mach 2 (2,450 kph or 1,470 mph) with a service ceiling of 19.3 km (~61,000 ft). With a small radar cross-section compared to that of the enormous B-52 — although still large compared to present-day stealth designs — the idea was that the B-58 could fly so fast and high that, by the time it was detected by enemy radar, it would be too late to scramble an interceptor. Meanwhile, contemporary anti-aircraft missiles lacked the capability to down targets at its altitude and speed.

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Member Post

 

I have taken to just skimming Ricochet; my FB feed has been culled to the point where I am only seeing the occasional picture of my granddaughter and updates about my upcoming 40th high school reunion. Because I can’t stand one more hippy post from my beloved niece featuring Bill Nye or another Bernie Sanders […]

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