Tag: Military

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America relish enjoy watching the credibility of the Steele dossier implode even further now that disreputable Clinton fixer Sid Blumenthal is being implicated for feeding information to Steele. They also shake their heads as President Trump says he would love a government shutdown unless he gets his way on border security just weeks after Republicans successfully convinced Americans that funding the government should not be contingent upon passing an immigration bill. And they have no problem honoring the U.S. military with a parade as President Trump wants to do, but Jim says there are more pressing national security concerns, including long-term funding and pay raises.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America focus squarely on the media in this episode of the Three Martini Lunch awards. They begin by discussing two massive stories that media either ignore or are severely downplaying – one overseas and one here in the U.S. Then they switch gears to reveal which stories received far too much coverage in 2017. Finally, they choose what they see as the best stories of the past year.

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Did anyone catch this story about the Russian war games this past September, 2017? Was it, according to sources in The Sun, a dry run for a larger invasion of Western Europe? https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5177666/russia-military-drills-invasion-europe-vladimir-putin/ In an earlier post, I told the story of Ryszard Kuklinski, a quiet Polish officer who found himself in the middle of […]

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Recorded on December 11, 2017
As the US Navy carries out high-profile missions in the Persian Gulf and off the Korean coast, China’s navy quietly continues its expansion: a maritime silk road stretching across the Indian Ocean to the Gulf of Aden. Admiral Gary Roughead, former US Navy chief of naval operations and Hoover’s Robert and Marion Oster Distinguished Military Fellow, discusses the stakes in the Middle East and Indo-Pacific theatres and assesses the US Navy’s current operational, maintenance, and shipbuilding needs.

Objects in the Binocular Lenses May Be Smaller Than They Appear

 

In the late 1980s, I witnessed the Reagan buildup of the American military, with entirely new generations of equipment overlaid on a lot of older supporting systems. The Air Force got B-1 bombers, F-16s, and F-15s. The Navy got new carriers, submarines, F-14s, and F/A-18s. The Army got the M-1 Main Battle Tank, M-2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, MLRS artillery systems, AH-64 and UH-60 helicopters, Patriot Air Defense Missile systems (fielded to break massive air strikes, not shoot-down missiles), Stingers, and a new generation of trucks for all the logistics. All of this equipment was fielded, along with new doctrine and systems of training, to change the calculus in Europe.

The Soviet-controlled Warsaw Pact was seen as an offensive juggernaut, poised to come crashing through the Fulda Gap into West Germany. It was widely believed that the only means of stopping such massed formations of tanks supported by mobile infantry and integrated fires from tube artillery to penetrating fighter-bombers was tactical nuclear weapons. But nucs are nucs, so duck and cover, there go the homelands. The Reagan buildup took advantage of a great leap forward in precision lethality of non-nuclear forces, to signal to both European populations and the Kremlin that we planned to stop the tank armies without triggering Armageddon. Then the unexpected happened and the Warsaw Pact disintegrated without a single artillery round fired in anger.

With East Germany and Czechoslovakia free of both Moscow and their own communist masters, we got a look at the vaunted Soviet war machinery and found bad wiring and the rust of neglected maintenance. A corrupt system that pretended to pay workers and insisted they live a lie was vulnerable to workers pretending to work and write readiness reports based on lies. The 10-foot-tall Soviet soldier was the Dread Pirate Roberts entering the castle.

My Lens Has Been Upgraded

 

Ah, Thanksgiving, that time of year we slow down to reflect on the multitude of blessings that are bestowed upon us each and every day. I practice gratitude a fair amount — acknowledging often a God and family who love me (a miracle in and of itself). Food, water, shelter, check — life gets pretty crappy, pretty fast if those are in the negative column. The blessing of this country, our freedoms however infringed, and our politics, however seemingly upside down; I firmly believe we are still better off than most.

And then all the little things like hot water delivered at the turn of a handle, illumination at the flip of a switch, easy travel, information at our fingertips, disposable diapers and wipes (yep, I’m an “all in” grandfather, ya know), hot espresso, good rye whiskey, I could go on and on. But this year’s Thanksgiving will be just a little more meaningful, taking less for granted and cherishing my people just a little more.

‘Twas October 4th of this year, I had just gotten home from my daughter’s house conducting Poppa shenanigans with the grandkids. I was surfing through Ricochet in amazement, yet again, of the vast amount of knowledge and thought-out opinions on virtually any subject, when the phone rang. It was a long-time family friend who lives in the area that we don’t see enough.

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When I was in the Army, the Commander-In-Chief was a guy named Jimmy Carter, and everyone hated him. However, you couldn’t admit it in a very loud voice, because trashing someone in your chain-of-command will get you – not might get you – will get you in a lot of trouble, up to and including […]

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I live and work in Chicago. I regularly see reports of criminal activity around my workplace, which bans guns, naturally. I carry various items for self-defense, such as a long flashlight or pocketknife. However, it seems like self-defense starts at a more fundamental level. Obviously, we do not walk around assuming every person is going […]

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As I have stated I am still tied into the Special Forces Community and intimately in this case thus I grow weary (angry) of hearing opinions of the media, ignorance of Army Special Forces and what they do, and our government for asking essentially dumb questions about what happened in Niger. Furthermore, I am sick […]

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A conversation with a friend recently (@bossmongo) about what happened to the Special Forces soldiers in Niger prompted me to write this. If you saw the MSM coverage of the event you’d have thought our highly trained Green Berets wandered into indian country and subsequently were ambushed in a one-sided fight. Appreciatively our own Daily […]

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Recorded on September 26, 2017

After nearly a quarter of a century of the same approach—diplomacy, sanctions, and concessions—the United States seems out of policy options other than a military solution with regard to North Korea . Michael Auslin, Hoover’s inaugural Williams-Griffis Fellow in Contemporary Asia, discusses what scenarios may unfold on the Korean peninsula as well as the possibility of nuclear engagement and nuclear accidents.

“Hey, I Got an Idea…”: Part 2

 

I pondered on this experience sipping my Knob Creek Whiskey and reading through the comments from Part 1. It seems some are familiar with the Fulton Extraction System. It was used in the 1965 James Bond classic Thunderball  while the erstwhile Bond embraces yet another beauty during the whole thing, apparently no harness needed for her (easy-peasy lemon-squeezy).

Again seen in one of my personal favorites The Green Berets in order to extract a high level POW — if you watch closely it might be Fritz (or his cousin Franz). The Black Knight had yet another rendition of it and at least he strapped in his passenger (but I am sure Bruce Wayne’s model far exceeds the lowest bidder US government model — private industry ya’ know). And I have even read there is a version in a video game called Metal Gear that you earn points for but not nearly as many cool points I will give you for going live though. I heard a funny on the radio that said “real” reality should be tried in lieu of virtual reality — ain’t that the truth.

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A few days ago I raised the question of Is There a Grand Strategy for the Current War? It was not a rhetorical question. I was hoping to provoke some strategic analysis of what the US is facing. The best response was a proposal that sounded like a bunch of Special Forces operations in countries […]

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After reading JGWs My First Jump story outstandingly describing what it is like parachuting with US Army, I started ruminating on my own military experiences that might be of interest to the Ricochetti and arrived here. Just a note: Hat tip to all of you prolific writers out there, I had to break this into two […]

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In this AEI Events Podcast, Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC) joins AEI’s Thomas Donnelly for a discussion of the ongoing military readiness crisis and what Congress can do to begin addressing it. The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Readiness, Rep. Wilson describes how the series of cuts to the national defense budget under President Obama severely damaged the US military, eroding its ability to perform all the tasks we ask of it.

Rep. Wilson speaks about the serious threats facing the country, focusing in particular on Russia, North Korea, and China, and the importance of US leadership in facing those challenges. Consistent American engagement in foreign affairs, he emphasizes, enabled democracies and free markets to flourish in Central and Eastern Europe, South America, and around the world, but that peace and prosperity is possible only through American military superiority. To reclaim and sustain that superiority, Rep. Wilson calls for Congress and the administration to support the higher defense budget proposed by the chairmen of the House and Senate Armed Services Committees. With persistence and steady leadership, he believes that the US can rebuild its military.

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Dateline: Somewhere in the Desert Private Kenny Schnozzola is one happy soldier. In an interview with this reporter, he says, “Joining the army was the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I was born with my dad’s big nose. I mean it was a real honker. But all my life, I’d identified as Rob […]

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For those who might not recognize it, “Fort Arnold” is the setting of the movie “Stripes,” the 1981 Bill Murray & Harold Ramis classic. “Classic” might seem a bit of a stretch, but any movie that makes as much of a contribution to the wider culture as “Stripes” cannot be considered anything but a classic. […]

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Nose Art and the Spirit of Our Military

 

The current establishment art world cultivates insularity and isolation as a means to prop up the vapid, dysfunctional art they favor. From sterile white box galleries to haughty elitist attitudes, lots of effort is poured into erecting barriers to separate the experience of art from the despised masses and the realities of life.

But art does not exist to be plaything for decadent crypto-Marxist hipsters. It is a vital outpouring of the human soul, a visual method of spiritual communication. Art can take on surprising and spontaneous forms in the strangest places to remind us of who we really are.

A species of folk art arose when we started taking our wars into the skies. In World War I, for a time the fighting aircraft were painted with bright colors and bold designs that evoked heraldry, like pilots were knights jousting in the air. This was abandoned once it was realized camouflage-type coloration increased survival rates.

Salena Zito talks to Sean Parnell: Army Ranger, combat infantryman with the elite 10th Mountain Division, and veteran of 485 days of fierce fighting along the Afghan-Pakistan border. Parnell’s unique leadership skills welded his platoon into one of the most fierce and effective American fighting units in modern military history. What is life like for active-duty military and young veterans in Trump’s America?

Salena Zito’s “Main Street Meets The Beltway” comes to you every Thursday on the Examining Politics podcast, and is a joint production of the Washington Examiner and SiriusXM Radio.