Tag: Military History

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The US Navy Faces Off Kamikazes at Okinawa

 

As the war turned against them in World War II, Japan tried a new tactic: the kamikaze. Pilots used their aircraft as one-way bombs against Allied warships and transports. The campaign started during the invasion of the Philippines in October 1944 and continued until the last day of the war.

“Rain of Steel: Mitscher’s Task Force 58, Ukagi’s Thunder Gods and the Kamikaze War off Okinawa,” by Stephen L. Moore, examines the most intense phase of the kamikaze campaign, that fought during the Allied invasion of Okinawa.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A War Easier to Start than End

 

Professor Paul Rahe, of Hillsdale College, is writing a multi-volume study of Sparta’s grand strategy during the Fifth Century BC. The first book “The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge” looked at Sparta during the Persian War.

“Sparta’s Second Attic War: The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta, 446-418 B. C,” by Paul A. Rahe continues his study of the Peloponnesian Wars. The third volume in the series, it examines the second phase of the war between Sparta and Athens, fought between 431 and 421 BC.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Navigator’s Account of SAC

 

Between 1946 and 1992 the Strategic Air Command was the United States’s main shield against Soviet aggression. Its bombers flew constantly, fueling aloft to reach any point in the world.

“SAC Time: A Navigator in the Strategic Air Command,” by Thomas E. Alexander, is the memoir of a man who spent three years in the Strategic Air Command and thirteen years in the Air National Guard.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The United States in a Perilous Year

 

The United States is going through some hard times right now. Some might believe 2020 to be the most challenging year faced by the Republic. The oldest among us remember a year far worse than 2020 or even the 1960s.

“The Year of Peril: America in 1942,” by Tracy Campbell, recalls that year. The United States had been unexpectedly thrust into a war, one we appeared to be losing in 1942.

On Independence Day, when so much seems to be going wrong, perhaps we need to take a step back, share a laugh, and then focus some attention on those whose dedication makes this and every Independence Day possible. This episode meets both of those needs as Dave sits down with comedian David Deeble to bring the blood pressure down a bit by looking at the lighter side of life. Everything is fair game, from rioters toppling garden gnomes, to the proper placement of deer crossing signs in this freewheeling and fun exchange.

Then, Dave talks with new Ricochet Member Nick Plosser, who has started his own podcast called The Half Percent. The podcast provides a needed outlet and opportunity for active duty military, veterans, guard and reserve troops to tell their story, share their experiences, and bring you into the world of that half percent of Americans who are serving their country in uniform at any given time. Nick is an inspiring gentleman, and has even persuaded Dave to be a guest on an upcoming episode of his podcast (we understand there will be humor and bourbon involved, though we’re not sure which comes first). If you’re looking for reasons to celebrate Independence Day, this episode will do the trick.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New Look at a Global Conflict

 

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars was the world’s first truly global conflict. Although the Seven Years’ War and Wars of American Independence were fought globally, the round of fighting triggered by the French Revolution saw major campaigns on a wider geographic scale than seen previously or since. No war, including World War II saw major fighting in as many different continents.

“The Napoleonic Wars: A Global History,” by Alexander Mikaberidze examines the conflict from a global perspective.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Book Review ‘Over There in the Air’ examines the relationship between Aggies and […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review: Heavy Date over Germany

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Rahe’s ‘Sparta’s First Attic War’ Provides a Clear Account of a Neglected Period of History

 

Today, few are aware of the 70-year struggle between Athens and Sparta, known collectively as the Peloponnesian Wars. Neglected in today’s history classes, most people who know of it largely recall the last phase of the war, where Sparta conquered Athens.

Sparta’s First Attic War: The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta, 478-446 B.C., by Paul A. Rahe, examines the period leading up to that phase of the Peloponnesian Wars. It examines the period when Sparta and Athens moved from allies to rivals, and finally to enemies.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Lady Death’ the Story of a Successful Sniper

 

Lyudmila Pavlichenko was the Soviet Army’s most successful female sniper during World War II. A fourth-year history student when Hitler invaded Russia, she quit school to enlist as a sniper. In 1941 and 1942 she racked up 309 kills.

“Lady Death: The Memoirs of Stalin’s Sniper,” by Lyudmila Pavlichenko, is an English translation of her memoirs. She died in 1974, leaving a manuscript copy of her memoirs, which remained unpublished until this century.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Now it’s Time to do an Update on YouTube History and Firearms Channels

 

Awhile ago, I did a post about the YouTube history channels I’d been watching as a respite from the simplistic sensationalist garbage on the TeeVees. Here’s an update, with some new finds.

Even though the Great War ended one hundred years prior to November 11, 2018, The Great War channel is still soldiering on. Dedicated to events, week by week, that happened a century ago during the war, the channel is still a great resource if you are interested in that conflict. Now that the war is “over,” the channel does updates on the aftermath. Boy, there is still a lot of fighting going on.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Book Review: “Smoke ’em” Shows Military’s Role in Masculine Rite

 

Anyone serving in the U.S. military before 1980 remembers the cry opening every break: “Smoke ‘em if you got ‘em.” Almost everyone, from the lowest private to the most senior officer present, would light up a cigarette.

Smoke ‘em if You Got ‘em: The Rise and Fall of the Military Cigarette Ration by Joel R. Bius examines the link between the military and cigarette smoking. He shows how cigarette consumption and the military were connected.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Siege of Fort Loudoun, 1765

 

Friday marked the 253rd Anniversary of the Siege of Fort Loudoun, November 16–18, 1765.

This happened at Fort Loudoun, Pennsylvania. A company of frontier militia, known locally as “The Black Boys” for the distinctive way they blackened their faces with soot and grease, laid siege to the local fort, then manned by a detachment of British regulars. These troops, experienced soldiers of the 42nd Royal Scots Regiment of Foot, also known as “the Black Watch,” were pinned down for two full days by the continuous harassment and interdiction fire from the militiamen’s rifles. Despite holding what ought to have been a superior position given the prevailing infantry tactics of the time, the British commander surrendered the fort and retreated back to Fort Pitt. There were no deaths, but neither were the British ever able to employ maneuver to bring their smoothbore muskets or bayonets against the militia.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. S.O.B.

 

Order and Laughter

101 years ago today, my father, Eaton Jackson Bowers, III, known to all as “Jack,” was born. A walking bundle of contradictions, he crackled and sparked with energy like a severed high voltage wire, and had only two speeds: high and asleep. Always impatient but ever dutiful, he loved to travel, but hated change. He dressed impeccably, practiced straight-laced Victorian manners, and kept all his things orderly and polished to perfection. Outwardly he was the grand Southern Gentleman, charming, hospitable and openhanded.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Turncoat’ Offers a Fresh Look at Benedict Arnold

 

Benedict Arnold has become synonymous with treason. Yet few today know his story. Turncoat: Benedict Arnold and the Crisis of American Liberty, by Stephen Brumwell is a fresh look at the man and his times.

Arnold was a brilliant general, probably only second to George Washington in talent. Next to Washington, he may be most responsible for the survival of the patriot cause. His dogged defense on Lake Champlain in 1776, and his spirited attacks in the Saratoga campaign in 1777, defeated Britain’s northern offensive and led France to enter the revolution on the American side. Absent Arnold, Britain would likely have won by 1778. Three years later, he tried to give Britain the war by betraying West Point to them.

Member Post

 

I’m interested in learning more about the causes & history of what started World War I, as well as about the war, itself; what the hell caused the horrid thing, which had such lasting influence on the rest of the century? Has anyone any recommendations for books on the subject, especially ones geared toward the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. Preview Open

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This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unlikely General: “Mad” Anthony Wayne and the Battle for America

 

They called him “Mad” Anthony Wayne. The book Unlikely General: Mad Anthony Wayne and the Battle for America by Mary Stockwell tells his story. A flawed, often-despised man, Wayne rose above his weaknesses to save the United States.

Stockwell frames Wayne’s biography around Wayne’s greatest achievement: his 1794 victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. It permitted the United States to grow into a nation, which spanned the North American continent. Fought at rapids on the Maumee River, Wayne’s Legion of the United States defeated a coalition of Indian tribes battling to keep settlers out of today’s state of Ohio.