Tag: microscopy

How to Build a Computer 30: SEMsational

 

This is a continuation of last time’s discussion on Electron Microscopy. In that one, we covered the question of why you’d want one of these and gave a summary of how you’d work one. Take some electrons, throw it at your sample, and watch what bounces off for information. Sounds so simple when we put it that way, right? This week we’re talking about what happens when you actually buckle down to do it in practice.

Taken from Chem lab, when there weren’t any chem techs around to stop me.

How to Build a Computer 29: Electron Microscopy

 

For the next couple of posts, we’ll be sauntering through the science of measurement. To put it simply, computer bits are really, really small. So as you wander through the world of building them how do you know you’ve made the thing right? Well, let’s start simple. You can just look at ’em. I could go on a great big tear about optical microscopy which is still an important subject, and relevant. The problem with it is that I just don’t find the subject very interesting. Still, you get some neat images.

This is my fingerprint, photographed on the background of one of them hard drive platters I ripped out of that drive in the video. FBI please ignore.

How to Build a Computer 15: Developing

 

No, this isn’t a story that’s still in progress, this is a process step. ‘Developing’ in this context means you’re chemically removing half your photoresist (either the stuff that was exposed in a positive photoresist or the stuff that wasn’t in a negative photoresist.) And no, it’s not about guys making software either. Look, if you’re going to stop us every single time the chance for a bad joke comes up… actually that’s pretty much the game plan. Carry on.

An exposed photoresist molecule. The cheese is carbon, the sausage is oxygen, and I’m thinking it’s high time to conduct some more chemistry, if you know what I mean.