Tag: Michigan

Byron York is in for Jim. Today, Greg and Byron are glad to see New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo losing some of his longtime donors. They also react to a Buzzfeed story about the FBI’s infiltrating militia groups in Michigan leading up to the kidnapping plot against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. But did the FBI only foil the plot or did it push militia members to pursue the idea in the first place? And they reveal how congressional Democrats are planning to pursue an amnesty policy through the massive spending bill they hope to pass this year.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the declining approval numbers for Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and one poll even has her trailing her likely GOP opponent. They also hammer President Biden for not joining three European nations in condemning Iran’s latest nuclear actions and even trying to ease up on sanctions against Tehran. And they roll their eyes as the Biden administration plans to go door-to-door to encourage more Americans to get vaccinated.

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Below are pleas from three nurses in Michigan–I got these from a Facebook friend that I respect. The first two posts are from fellow nurses she quoted, and the last post is from her.  These women are in the thick of this battle, so they witness things that most of us don’t see. Their perspective […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they shred the blatantly partisan attempt by congressional Democrats to add four more seats (meaning lefties) to the U.S. Supreme Court but welcome House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announcing she has “no plans” to bring the bill up for a vote. They also react to the new polling showing a sharp drop in public confidence in the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine since the FDA ordered a pause this week. And they examine how Michigan’s COVID numbers are very high but interest in the vaccine is quite low.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three crazy martinis. First, they look at Michigan’s terrible COVID numbers and discuss why Gov. Whitmer is asking but not mandating that high schools suspend sports and in-person classes. They also groan as President Biden sets up his special commission to consider changes to the Supreme Court, including the number of justices and how long they should be able to serve. And they’re glad to see all the real problems in the world must be solved since CNN is busy declaring Asian font to be racist.

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Two disclaimers; first of all, I am not a lawyer. Second is that I have learned to never assume that any politician is some super-genius executing a plan above my capacity to discern or comprehend. I watched too many people fool themselves with the idea that George W. Bush’s politically disastrous silences were part of […]

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Ep. 265 – Jackson Darr, a self-described “data monkey” is Editor at RRHElections.com, the nation’s largest blog on elections and polling from a right-leaning perspective, explains the voting irregularities and fraud that has caused Election 2020 to be turned on its head.

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Apprently, the Trump Campaign will be filing even more lawsuits come Monday. Sadly, I don’t think the courts, even SCOTUS is going to provide the remedy here. Even if fraud is conclusively proven – and it certainly can be proven – is there a legal remedy that can be ordered, even by the SCOTUS (Roberts […]

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BREAKING: Michigan @USPS Whistleblower Details Directive From Superiors: Back-Date Late Mail-In-Ballots As Received November 3rd, 2020 So They Are Accepted “Separate them from standard letter mail so they can hand stamp them with YESTERDAY'S DATE & put them through"#MailFraud pic.twitter.com/n7AcNwpq80 — James O'Keefe (@JamesOKeefeIII) November 5, 2020   Preview Open

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Vindication in Michigan: A Victory for the Rule of Law

 

Back in early May, I put up a post entitled Despotism Comes to Michigan, going into some detail concerning Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s seizure of what amounts to dictatorial powers. In it, I suggested two things: first, that the 1945 law under which she claimed to be exercising emergency powers had been replaced by the 1976 law authorizing the legislature to confer on the governor such powers for a limited period of time; and second, that the 1945 law was unconstitutional from the start because it violated the fundamental constitutional principle of the separation of powers by placing the legislative power and the executive power together in the hands of a single person when an emergency had been declared and by leaving the declaration of an emergency to the discretion of that person.

Back in late April, the Michigan Republicans, who control both the state house and the state senate, refused to renew the grant of emergency powers to Governor Whitmer under the 1976 statute and filed suit in state court, arguing that the 1945 act could not be the basis for unilateral action on her part. At the local level and in the appeals court, the Republicans were shot down.

But today, much to my surprise, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that she had violated her constitutional authority by continuing to issue emergency orders after the legislature had refused to renew her powers. And in the process the court ruled that the 1945 act was, as I had suggested, unconstitutional.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss the stunning hypocrisy of Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and her husband and other Democratic governors over Memorial Day weekend.  Greg also shares a very disturbing story about voting by mail in his home state.  They also shudder as President Trump spend time on Twitter trying to implicate MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough in the death of a congressional intern nearly 20 years ago.  And they react to economic officials from the Clinton and Obama administrations admit they are terrified that the economy could be rebounding by Election Day.

We’re ending the week with all crazy martinis! First, we dissect the partisan fury of Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel who says President Trump is no longer welcome in the state because he didn’t wear a mask before cameras while visiting a Ford plant on Thursday. They also hammer Joe Biden for telling a prominent black talk show host, “If you have a problem figuring out if you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black.” And they react to President Trump unloading on Fox News for not doing more to help him and other Republicans win.

Despotism Comes to Michigan

 

In early Rome, there was an office called the dictatorship. There was a resort to this institution only in an emergency when the senate and the two consuls were persuaded that the latter were not up to the challenge and that the crisis could not be handled unless there was a suspension of the laws that ordinarily limited the power of magistrates. The dictator’s scope was restricted. He was appointed for a particular purpose – and for that purpose only. He was supposed to resign when the emergency passed. Under no circumstances could he remain in office longer than six months, and when his authority lapsed he was subject to judgment. Necessity was the sole justification for any breach of the law.

The office fell into abeyance after the Second Punic War. It was revived, however, in a different form by Sulla who held the office for a handful of years after Rome’s first civil war, and it was revived again in yet another form by Julius Caesar, who had himself named dictator for life. During the American Revolution, a proposal was floated for including a provision for dictatorship within the Virginia constitution, and Thomas Jefferson fiercely attacked the idea in his Notes on the State of Virginia.

Gretchen Whitmer Doubles Down

 

Last week, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer doubled down, extending the Michigan lockdown until mid-May. The new executive order is in modest ways an improvement on its immediate predecessors, which I described two weeks ago in a post entitled “The Wicked Witch of the Midwest.” One can now operate a motorboat; buy paint for one’s house and seeds for one’s garden; and even travel to a second home. In other ways, however, ”the temporary requirement” that everyone “suspend activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life” is pure idiocy. It still rules out elective surgery while allowing abortion – presumably because, in the world of Gretchen Whitmer and today’s feminists, the not-yet-born are not really alive. Our governor has even had the effrontery to defend abortion as “life-enhancing.” In Michigan (and in some other states), some must die so that others can enjoy themselves.

Given what we knew and what we did not know, when the lockdowns began, it may have made sense for a brief time to systematically minimize human contact. The Wuhan coronavirus is exceedingly contagious, and we then possessed no herd immunity. On the Diamond Princess, virtually everyone was exposed, 18% of those on the cruise contracted the virus, and nearly 10% of those who did contract it died. In Wuhan, China and in northern Italy, the epidemic overwhelmed the health system – and there was reason to fear that the like might happen here. The aim of the lockdowns was not to prevent the spread of the virus. Given how easily it could be contracted and the absence of a vaccine, it was not even possible to impede it for long. Our aim was modest: to delay its onset and slow down the spread in the hope that our hospitals and health professionals could cope.

We know a bit more now. We know that most of those who contract the disease are asymptomatic; that the asymptomatic are, nonetheless, contagious; and that those most apt to die are elderly individuals and others with underlying health conditions. In Michigan, the mean age of those who die is 76 and the average age is 74.5. In Italy, where half of the population is over 47, I read that 99% of those who died suffered from other comorbidities. In New York, 94% suffered from at least one comorbidity and 88% suffered from more than one. Those who go on cruises on ships such as the Diamond Princess are, as one wag put it, “the newly wed and the nearly dead.” It was the presence of a great many old folks on the voyage that explains the high mortality rate.

The Curious Case of ‘Gary B’

 

In Gary B. v. Whitmer, a divided panel of the Sixth Circuit last week held that the state of Michigan owed a constitutional duty to ensure that students in the worst-performing public and charter schools in Detroit receive “a basic minimum education, meaning one that provides a chance at foundational literacy.” The logic behind this theory is straightforward enough. Illiterate young people have no ability to participate in democratic deliberations and no skills to support themselves or their families. And society overall is made worse off with fewer able participants to join a well-functioning economy.

In the majority opinion, Judge Eric Clay detailed the bankruptcy of Detroit’s public school system, whose dismal educational performance, he wrote, was driven by “the absence of qualified teachers, crumbling facilities, and insufficient materials.” He then correctly concluded that the state has general oversight and control over the educational system and is thus a proper constitutional target to remedy the bankrupt and derelict Detroit school system. The case was decided on the pleadings, which let the majority define its right to a minimum education without getting into the details of how best to implement the right in practice. One major problem with the decision is its inability to define the content of this positive right to government support. Full disclosure: Judge Eric Murphy, who dissented on these grounds, is my friend and former student.

Gary B. relies on Section 1983 of the Civil Rights Act, which enables federal courts to provide a remedy against any Governor or other state officials who have brought about “the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution.” That Section covers violations of the Fourteenth Amendment, which provides that no person should be deprived of the protection of life, liberty, or property without due process of law, nor denied the equal protection of the laws.