Tag: mentorship

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Okay, the stabbing was metaphorical but it was performed by an Eskimo — a Yup’ik Eskimo to be precise, and I deserved it. His name is David, but we all call him DJ. He is a friend, and he has been my ally on this desperate battlefield we call life for many seasons. More

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How are small businesses doing in the current economy? How do you find a professional mentor or use content to build your business? How do you deal with depression as an entrepreneur or professional? Ramon Ray, Founder, Smart Hustle Media and Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Alice joins Carol to talk about all things small business and entrepreneurship.

Ramon Ray has started four companies and sold two of them. He’s the author of four books, including his latest, Celebrity CEO.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Blurred Lines”: Scandals in Bohemia and Ecclesia

 

“And that’s why I’m gon’ take a good girl / I know you want it… / I hate these blurred lines / I know you want it… / But you’re a good girl…” Unlike in Thicke’s hit, the “it” youth seeking mentorship want is hopefully not sex. Nonetheless, decent people have long suspected that among more bohemian sorts — actors, musicians, academics, etc — the blurring of lines between mentorship and sexual grooming, coupled with the impulse to save face, risks fostering a climate of sexual abuse. I’ve even heard decent people argue that those who go into bohemian fields ought to know what they’re getting into, and if they’re abused, it’s really their fault.

Decent people don’t want bohemian clergy. Nonetheless, religious callings have more in common with the bohemian than decent people might like to think. It’s appropriate for spiritual mentorship to be intense (possibly even more intense than intellectual or artistic mentorship). It’s normal for charismatic spiritual leaders to attract groupies (also known as disciples). Great good can come from both these dynamics. But also great evil. Decent people are properly sensitive to the great harm false accusations can do, and it feels awful to suspect those called to holiness of perverting these dynamics. Nonetheless, perversion has obviously happened — especially, it seems, in Catholic seminaries.

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