Tag: Men

Saving Our Gun Rights Means Saving People From Suicide

 

We’ve known for years now that the problem with gun deaths in America isn’t street gangs and other criminals, it’s the thousands of people who commit suicide with a firearm each year. This horror is affecting men (especially men who live in small, rural towns) to a much greater extent than it is women. But rather than reach out to men and channel their feelings of frustration and impotence into more positive, traditional ways, the American Psychological Association says the real problem is they’re acting like men. 

“Traditional masculinity ideology has been shown to limit males’ psychological development, constrain their behavior, result in gender role strain and gender role conflict and negatively influence mental health and physical health... Researchers led by James Mahalik, PhD, of Boston College, found that the more men conformed to masculine norms, the more likely they were to consider as normal risky health behaviors such as heavy drinking, using tobacco and avoiding vegetables, and to engage in these risky behaviors themselves.”

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This Is What Real Men Do

 

We heard a lot of talk about “pajama boy”, and how the concept of manliness is under attack. I’ve read stories of honeymooners diving the ocean, and how one newlywed husband looses his life defending his bride against a shark attack. I’ve read other stories of men rising to the occasion, especially with the 9/11 […]

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Popular Turkic Misapprehensions Cleared Up

 

Are Turkmen men? Without ever having got to close to one, I nevertheless confidently assert about 50% of them are. But we’ve all wondered, I am sure. I got to thinking again about this, as I’ve been watching Turkish TV. My listening comprehension is going nowhere, but I can at least read the credits, which […]

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Can Feminists Cure What Ails Men?

 

“Boys need feminists’ help too,” declares Feministing.com founder Jessica Valenti. Writing in the New York Times, Valenti worries that women are “protest[ing], run[ning] for office, and embrac[ing] the movement for gender equality in record numbers, [while] a generation of mostly white men are being radicalized into believing that their problems stem from women’s progress.”

Valenti cites the “manosphere,” the network of websites that peddle misogyny, and she’s right that it is disturbing. But Valenti undermines her case by citing the popularity of Jordan Peterson as more evidence of woman hatred. On the contrary, Valenti and other feminists would do well to remove their women-centric blinders and examine the situation of young men more sympathetically.

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The Love of Dangerous Things

 

There’s talk – silly, absurd talk – of banning the private ownership of cars. Molon labe, baby! You can have my Yukon, my three-ton id, when you pry it from my cold dead hands. And you can forget the self-driving nonsense, too: up here where I live, you can’t see the lines on the road four months out of the year on account of the blowing snow. Good luck dealing with that, Google.

Ayn Rand, in one of her two major works of fiction (I’m going to go with Atlas Shrugged, but someone correct me if I’m wrong – it’s been almost 40 years since I read it) has her heroine wax rhapsodic (as if there’s any other way to wax) about the act of smoking. Dagney (or possibly Dominique) marvels at the flame held in obeisance inches from her, the spark of destruction so casually lashed into service for the pleasure of mankind. Never having been a smoker, and coming of age as I did during the first great anti-smoking crusades of the ’70s, I admit that the imagery was less compelling for me than it might have been for someone of my parents’ generation. But Dagney’s ruminations have remained with me, an oddly vivid example of our peculiar attraction to dangerous things – and to mastering them.

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The Nothing Box

 

There has been so much tension between men and women with all the stories of exploitation and accusations that I felt we needed a little something that we could laugh at–about ourselves and each other. Enjoy! More

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Women and Sex

 

With all the men being taken down by past exploits caused by their sexual drive (rightly so in all too many cases) I started to look for symmetry in this situation. While I believe that men and women are different in many ways I have never thought women were morally superior to men. It is […]

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Confessions of a failson

 

This was written as a response to this article by Rod Dreher: http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/failsons-and-the-women-who-love-them Given that it turned into more of an essay (or a long rant) then a comment, I figured I’d post it here. Apologies in advance…actually no. No apologies.  More

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In Search of Meekness: Musings on Harvey Weinstein

 

Author’s note: I sincerely hope that what I’ve written below is not a new thought. Because if it is, we are in much worse trouble than I already believe us to be. Yes, I could do a simple internet search to find out what else has been written on this concept, but I like to […]

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Men Do Multitask!

 

Around three PM yesterday, I was sitting in the basement StadCave, when I had an epiphany a really deep thought—men do multitask! There I was: writing on my basement laptop, watching the Oregon State-Colorado State football game, eating pizza, and drinking beer. More

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Sex, Muscle, Brain & Testosterone Replacement Therapy

 

With Trump’s Inauguration up front, and his remarkable campaign behind, here’s a recent conversation I had on the relationship between male sexual function, confidence, and energy, with Dr. John Crisler, a leading practitioner in the field of testosterone replacement therapy. At 58, Dr. Crisler credits “perfectly tuned” hormones for helping him retain his remarkable physical […]

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The World Needs More Men

 

It’s OK to be a man. And it’s OK to act like a man.

Unless you go to college. College, it seems, thinks being a man is nothing more than a catch phrase for being an unrepentant rapist even if you’ve never had such a disgusting thought in your life, nor actually committed the violent act. In college, being a man means you’re unable to find love, incapable of dealing with your feelings, have (or one day will have!) contributed to the degradation of all women everywhere and, therefore, must be neutered in public and private.

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A Real Conversation Starter

 

Further to a discussion with @6foot2inhighheels I thought the Ricochet community may have some thoughts. Said 6foot2: “The revelation that men have distinctly different motivations and impulses that are at odds with female cultural assumptions came to me late in life, and from an unexpected source; a young man who explained everything in one simple […]

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Men at Work … or Not

 

shutterstock_284883917We’ve heard a great deal this campaign year about the plight of the working class. The left tells a story about the middle class being destroyed by predatory millionaires and billionaires who are soaking up 99 percent of the “income gains” (as if national income were one giant Big Gulp and the one percent managed to nab the biggest straws).

Donald Trump tells a different story. The jobs that once provided a stable middle-class income have been outsourced. If people are unemployed, it’s because the factories are all in Guangzhou or Juarez. Trump promises that he will bring those jobs back.

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First They Came for the Porkies

 

Porcellian-ClubHahvahd’s male-only clubs have forged life-long relationships. And that, of course, is the problem.

“Once a Porcellian always a Porcellian,” read a 1940 Time magazine article about the oldest of Harvard University’s secretive, all-male “final clubs.” “Porkies keep up their Porkie friendships all their lives, go back religiously to the annual Porkie banquet at which new members are initiated. … From the Pore’s clubrooms, non-Porcellians are religiously excluded.”

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The War on Men

 

shutterstock_162854771You don’t have to be a “revolutionary” presidential candidate to know that there’s something seriously wrong about the way boys are growing into men in this country.

Most of the media is obsessed with fraternities, creepy boys with “affluenza,” and lax brosMost of that reporting follows a familiar template: bad (white) boys and their victims. It’s a reliably monotonous litany because that frees them from the responsibility of looking at what happens to (mostly non-white) boys who grow up in poor neighborhoods. Short answer: nothing much good. From Citylab:

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Sex and the Single (Working Class) Guy

 

IMG_1157In recent years, we’ve been treated to plenty of articles regarding the romantic and sexual habits of the young and college-educated. In general, the observation is that the ladies are finding it difficult to find men who are interested in committed relationships or marriage, while the guys are blithely bouncing from bed to bed. While no stereotype is true of the whole — as my early-20s self of a decade ago would have bitterly pointed out to you — this one seems to reflect at least a part of reality.

Though there’s no shortage of likely causes — including the ongoing effects of the Sexual Revolution — two factors that have rightly attracted attention of late are the power of scarcity within different dating markets and how those markets are largely demarcated by education (e.g., college graduates generally limit their dating pools to other college grads). Among college-aged Millennials, for instance, there are four women for every three men. In that demographic, this means that men’s preferences dominate, not in spite of their low numbers, but because of them. Consequently sexual mores tend to be loose and committed relationships relatively rare. (“Won’t sleep with me? Sorry, baby, there’s plenty who will.”) When you factor in youthful hormones, it’s little wonder that sex tends to happen relatively early and requires less commitment.

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What Men Want

 

shutterstock_265843157“[Sex is] a contest to see who cares less, and guys win a lot at caring less,” Amanda says.

A brutal Vanity Fair column about the instant hookup world of Tinder shows one side of what men want and what they don’t. And it’s neither pretty nor surprising.

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Manliness: An Unsung Trait of the Train Heroes

 
French Train Heroes
Frederic Legrand – COMEO / Shutterstock.com

When a heavily armed man emerged from the bathroom of a European train and began what was clearly intended as a massacre of innocent, unsuspecting civilians, six men ranging in age from 22 to 62 sprang into action. A banker and a middle-aged academic, both French, were first on the scene. The sound of gunfire awakened three young American tourists: Alek Skarlatos, Spencer Stone, and Anthony Sadler. In a moment evocative of the Flight 93 passengers’ shining courage on 9/11, Skarlatos saw Ayoub El-Khazzani struggling with one of his guns and leapt up, saying simply “Let’s go” to his friends.

The three Americans, two Frenchmen, and one Briton who took on the terrorist were unarmed — though, thank God, in the case of two (the third was fit too), their military training prepared them for violence. That’s right. For the world to be safe for most people, good people must learn the arts of war to prevent bad people from ruling through terror. It’s true of individuals, and it’s true of nations.

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