Tag: medical ethics

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The following is a summary (not word for word) excerpt I typed out from an interview on the Issues, Etc. podcast with Dr. Tara Sander Lee from the Charlotte Lozier Institute regarding their analysis of whether or not and if so how aborted fetal cell lines have been used in the development, production, and/or testing […]

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The above is the title I wanted to use for my newest article in Salvo, found here.  I’d appreciate feedback  from the Ricochet community and also want to plug Salvo, where you can find regular contributions from myself, Anthony Esolen, Hugh Ross, Nicole King, Denyse O’Leary, Heather Zeiger, James Kushiner and others.    Preview Open

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http://enews.earthlink.net/article/us?guid=20190311/43a11e2b-770e-423a-855c-ec513348ac1b Please especially read the part about 16-year-old Connor Thonen-Fleck towards the end, seeking insurance coverage to give “him” a “more typically male chest,” which is to say not an inborn healthy female chest – as if gender reassignment by the body owner’s brain makes it real in every way, thereby a guide to surgery. Whereas […]

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This essay is a reprint from Pilgrims Path. Pilgrims Path was a blog I started writing in 2011. I thought I would reprint this essay I originally wrote in 2012, and published on Ricochet in December 2015. Infanticide has now become fashionable in 2019. Six years have passed since I wrote this essay. All change […]

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Transgender Man’s Pregnancy Roils Family Members

 

The title above was not a headline in the National Enquirer; it was the title of an Ask Amy column, from March 9. In reading the column I shifted between shock and confusion; the letter writer was in distress because her son’s decision to become pregnant as a transgender male had created a rupture in her family that she didn’t know to heal.

I couldn’t believe what I was reading. I know that gender and sexual identities have been tampered with and distorted for many years, but I wondered: how in the world does a transgender man become pregnant, and more importantly, how does this kind of insanity take place in today’s society?

Why Can’t We Make Better Painkillers?

 

painkillerI asked this question on Fred’s post about the problems his family’s had filling his mom’s prescriptions for painkillers — medication she needs to treat the pain of advanced lung cancer. Moments after asking it, I began thinking, “Hey, wait — that’s a good question.”

Or maybe it isn’t, but I figured there could be no harm asking, because I bet I’m not the only one to wonder.

Why is it that the only really effective painkillers we seem to have are highly addictive and dangerous drugs that addicts love? The point of a painkiller is to make the pain go away, not to get you high, so why do we not yet have a class of drugs that only do the former? Or, to wit: We already do have many of them, such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen. And those are great, effective drugs, as anyone who’s had a headache or a sprained ankle knows. But apparently, they’re not effective enough to treat more serious pain.

The Ethical Dilemma

 

shutterstock_68073163The folks at Planned Parenthood and its defenders are trying to mitigate their public relations nightmare by reminding us that fetal tissue played a vital role in the development of vaccines, including polio. Their main points are:

  • We are doing vital work in saving lives.
  • If you received the vaccination and you don’t have polio you are already an accomplice, so get over it.

Where then, do you draw the line?

Most of us received the vaccine as a matter of course, before we were old enough to understand the concept of the ethical dilemma. But we surely could have understood when we had our own children vaccinated; that is, if we had even known about the history of the research.

The Unnaturals

 

Blueprint_for_Vetruvian_man_by_ThE_UnKO_LeMaLife has a natural order which must be respected in order to achieve happiness. Most conservatives agree to that. Men and women are naturally different. Children are naturally different from adults. Suffering and death are a natural part of life, and we should be skeptical of any utopian scheme that wishes to circumvent them.

I concede all that. Yet in conceding that, I cannot help but conclude that my own existence is deeply unnatural. Let me explain.

Without the intervention of modern medicine, I would have died several times over in childhood. If you asked me whether Mother Nature intended me to be alive, the only reasonable answer I could come up with is “No”. Moreover, I’m a third-generation unnatural: the child of a child who would have died in childhood without heroic medical intervention. I married a man who has robust good health, but it’s likely that our children (should we manage to have any) will be fourth-generation unnaturals.