Tag: Medicaid

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Church attendance in the United States is at an all-time low, according to a Gallup poll released in April 2019. This decline has not been a steady one. Indeed, over the last 20 years, church attendance has fallen by 20 percent. This might not sound like cause for concern off the bat. And if you’re not […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Pence Coronavirus Team Announces Daily Briefing [updated with transcript links]

 

We’ll be back here every day. Get used to seeing us. We’ll bring the experts in to make sure to give you the best and most high quality real time information. Best people in the world.

–Vice President Pence

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Battle Over Medicaid Work Requirements

 

Over at City Journal, I argue that we should pay more attention to the new wave of Medicaid reforms bubbling up from the states, especially the so-called work requirements. Back in January, Kentucky became the first state to announce “work requirements” as a condition for Medicaid eligibility. Well actually, it is a “community engagement” requirement which can be satisfied by working, looking for work, taking a class, going to rehab, and other productive activities. And it applies only to childless, able-bodied adults.

But still, the Kentucky program was blessed by the Trump Health and Human Services Department, so the Resistance is out in full force to halt the community engagement requirement. Within days of the Kentucky announcement, a coalition of liberal activist groups, including the dubious Southern Poverty Law Center, filed a class action lawsuit to block Bevin’s Medicaid reforms. While that lawsuit has been dragging on, Bevin has filed a counter-suit, and ten more states have sought to implement their own community engagement program.

On this week’s episode of Banter, AEI research fellow in poverty studies Angela Rachidi discusses the child tax credit and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ recent move to consider state requests for work-related Medicaid requirements. As an expert in support programs for low-income families, her work at AEI focuses on poverty and the effects of federal safety net programs. Before joining AEI, Rachidi served as deputy commissioner in New York City’s Department of Social Services. She writes frequently for the New York Post, The Hill, InsideSources, and RealClearMarkets.com.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleasantly surprised to see incoming Democratic Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam back away from pushing Medicaid expansion, much to the consternation of liberals. They also shudder as a new generic poll of voters suggests Republicans are in for a very rough 2018, as Democrats lead big among women and young people and even hold slight edges among men and senior citizens. And Jim sounds off on actor Matt Damon’s insistence that he never knew about any of Harvey Weinstein’s alleged sexual assaults and harassment.

It’s a tradition dating back to the Founding Fathers: the American government financing safeguards, be it retirement (Social Security), health benefits (Medicare), or rewards for military service in the form of federal entitlements. In an age of debt and deficits, when will lawmakers address entitlement reform? John Cogan, Hoover’s Leonard and Shirley Ely Senior Fellow and author of a new book on the long history of federal entitlements, assesses where the Trump administration goes from here.

Richard Epstein looks at the virtues and vices of the failed congressional plans to repeal and replace Obamacare, explains what comes next, and lays out what meaningful free market reform would look like.

Richard Epstein examines the principles that should guide efforts to reform America’s tax system.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Where Affordable, Altruistic Healthcare Goes to Die

 

As conservatives, we’re never surprised by news that Obamacare hasn’t fixed the nightmares facing the typical American confronted with medical bills. Nor are we surprised when Obamacare only makes them worse. A few years ago, Jim Epstein at Reason predicted the demise of health-sharing ministries at the hands of Obamacare’s subsidized exchanges. The good news is that Epstein was wrong: Membership in health-sharing ministries has only grown as frustration with commercial prepaid plans under the Affordable Care Act continues to mount. According to the New York Times,

[M]embership in sharing ministries has more than doubled over the last six years, to 535,000 from about 200,000, according to the Alliance of Health Care Sharing Ministries.

Richard Epstein responds to the recent controversy over sharp increases in the price of EpiPens and explains the economic dynamics underpinning the larger debate about prescription drug costs.

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I just now listened to the Rick Perry’s speech to the National Press Club that has had people talking the past few days. (As I’ve said so many times that I’m almost as tired of hearing about it as everyone who has had the unfortunate experience of hearing me say it is tired of it: […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Finding Out What’s In It, Vol. CCLXIV

 

medicaidEarlier this week, The Wall Street Journal reported on the latest negative unintended consequences of Obamacare:

Millions of people have gained health coverage through Medicaid since states began expanding the program under the Affordable Care Act. That also means more Americans may find themselves caught in a little-known law that lets states go after their assets after they die.

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In this town hall type meeting, Chris Christie stands up to a pro-Obamacare CWA union activist. Preview Open

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To be blunt, I’m tied up with grading my students’ end of semester exams and I don’t have the time or the mental energy to respond properly. Those Ricochet Members with the mental fortitude and ambition to post their points and ideas would be greatly appreciated. Earlier this week I commented on the New York […]

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The State of Washington was one of the Blue states that built their own ObamaCare Exchange, and wholeheartedly expanded their Medicaid program (with the admittedly temporary increase in Federal funding). I recently read an article in my local Everett Herald newspaper, about a survey the legislature is contemplating, of state doctors about the effects of […]

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