Tag: mayors

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome some of the most radical leftist mayors finally running out of patience with teachers’ unions who refuse to agree to in-person education. They also discuss Liz Cheney surviving as chair of the GOP House Conference and what the right way is to navigate the Marjorie Taylor Greene soap opera. And they hammer the Biden administration for considering a plan to mail masks to every American.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss a new Georgia investigation into efforts to register the dead and other ineligible voters for the January Senate runoffs. They also react to attorney Lin Wood telling Republicans not to vote in the runoffs unless the two GOP senators publicly demand a special session of the legislature to address issues in the presidential race. And they roll their eyes as Los Angeles tells people not to interact with anyone outside their own homes and two more mayors prove themselves to be massive hypocrites on COVID restrictions.

Steven Malanga and Rafael Mangual join Seth Barron to discuss concerns that lawlessness is returning to American cities, a theme that Malanga and Mangual explore in separate feature stories in the Summer 2019 Issue of City Journal.

Memories of the urban chaos and disorder of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s have faded, and many local leaders today have forgotten the lessons of that bygone era. Malanga’s story, “The Cost of Bad Intentions” (available soon online), shows how a new generation of politicians are bringing back some of the terrible policies that got American cities into trouble in the first place. On crime and incarceration, Mangual argues that the new disorder will grow worse if progressives manage to overhaul the American criminal-justice system.

Mick Cornett joins Aaron Renn to discuss Cornett’s time as mayor of Oklahoma City (2004-2018) and his new book The Next American City: The Big Promise of Our Midsize Metros.

America is full of midsize cities that have prospered through smart governance, including Charleston, Des Moines, Indianapolis, Sacramento—and Oklahoma City. Over the last decade-plus, elected officials and community leaders have made real progress on improving these urban centers, boosting civic vitality, and creating economic opportunity for residents.

The long-awaited Ricochet Harvard Lunch Club mug is here!

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 1, 2017, it’s the This is What the Trump Trap Looks Like  edition of the podcast. We are brought to you this week by Patriot Mobile. Do you want a portion of every dollar you pay for mobile phone service to go to left wing causes? That may be happening, but there is an answer: Patriot Mobile. And we are also brought to you by SimpliSafe. Protect your home the smart way without the expensive long-term contracts using Simply Safe home security. Visit Simply Safe-dot-com-slash-RICOCHET. That’s spelled S-I-M-P-L-I-S-A-F-E dot com slash Ricochet.

Greg Corombos of Radio America and Ian Tuttle of National Review applaud House Speaker Paul Ryan for quashing an attempt by some Republicans to bring back earmarks. They also slam the defiant Democratic mayors who insist illegal immigrants will be fully protected from deportation in their cities. And they discuss the social media crackdown on fake news and what passes for journalism on the left these days.

City Journal editor Brian Anderson and senior editor Steve Malanga discuss the GOP’s new generation of pragmatic, problem-solving mayors that have helped turn around some of America’s struggling cities.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.