Tag: may

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Welcome to this special, Corbyn-Might Maneuver edition of the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast with our British-Irish-U.K. correspondent William Campbell coming to us (naturally) from Berlin to give us the lowdown on the shocking outcome of the British Parliamentary elections. William is staying up until three in the morning just so we can podcast the […]

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for June 6, 2017, it’s episode 123, the Southern Fried Terror edition of the podcast coming to you this week (or so it may sound) from the moon! Todd is in Farmington Connecticut, Mike is in Palo Alto, we are recording the podcast on a Dictaphone Steampunk […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. May Jobs Report: Bad But Not Terrible

 

The US employment rate ticked lower last month, and at 4.3% fell to its lowest level since May 2001. But that’s pretty much where the good news ends. Job growth was just 138,000 versus Wall Street expectations of 180,000, and the prior two months were revised down a net 66,000 jobs. (Though it seems the calendar played a role here. The payroll survey week may have been a bit too early to capture students going to work at summer jobs.)

Moreover, the jobless rate fell “for all the wrong reasons,” notes Capital Economics. The decline was driven by the labor force participation rate falling 0.2 percentage point to 62.7%. The employment rate fell by the same amount.

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Welcome to the Special Bonus Euro-edition of the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for May 26, 2017, introducing our European correspondent William Campbell. We’ve decided that we don’t sound sophisticated enough (why did it take so long to reach *that* conclusion??) and we have attempted to remedy that situation by finding a new HLC contributor […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Winning through Ricochet – and Knowing What You’ve Lost

 

Ah, collagen. The most abundant protein in animals. Great for cooking into rich sauces – and glue (hence the name). It gives structure to mammals’ extracellular space. Your skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, mucous membranes, cartilage, bones, and teeth all depend on collagen for strength. When our collagen lets us down, we can expect trouble.

Several diseases, from rheumatoid arthritis to scurvy, are connective-tissue diseases. Several attack our abundant collagen specifically. Sometimes, though, collagen weakens not because it’s under attack, but because it never formed right to begin with. Several genes have been identified as causing Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), congenitally weakened cartilage, and several genes remain to be discovered. The worst types of EDS are super-weird, and super-scary. Your silly-putty skin could be so loose and stretchy that it’s obvious from birth you’d be a freak-show star, pulling your neck skin over your face for strangers’ amusement. Or maybe your joints dislocate so easily you’d join the circus as a contortionist, disarticulating yourself for cold, hard cash. Or maybe EDS causes your organs to explode, far less marketable but still super-scary. Many of us, if we’ve heard of EDS at all, have more reason to think “circus freak” than “subtle.”

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I won’t rehash how utterly meritless Jimmy Kimmel’s fictitious plea for healthcare is. More

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