Tag: May Days

May Day: Indianapolis 500

 

The 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was glorious. It was the fastest qualifying field ever and the fastest ever race on the track. And, a wonderfully positive, emotional driving star won his fourth Indy 500 checkered flag in a race that was a battle to the very last lap. The race was largely unmarred by accidents and was run entirely under bright blue skies. The very best part: the 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was before a full stadium of unmuzzled fans.

This great American tradition, signaling the start of summer, was a loud rejection of the entire leftist agenda, with the sweet smell of racing fuel and hot tires savored by Americans shoulder to shoulder in the sunshine without any sign of leftist plandemic fear and virtue signaling face coverings in the sea of normal humanity. The cherry on top was the winner; Helio Castroneves won at age 46.

True, there was a scattering of masks, frequently pulled down, in the press and event officiating crew. Yet, there was no solidarity in that stance. The masks have dropped. The official story was that track management limited fans to 40 percent, in submission to so-called public health officials or “experts.” On camera, it looked like the stands were full.

How to Make a MAYDAY Call

 

You probably do not imagine yourself making a Mayday or SOS call, but it is good to know how to do so in an emergency. In an amazing act of government reasonableness, anyone can call on any band in a real, life- or limb-threatening emergency. I could use my handy-talkie on a military or police band, or the dedicated marine radio band regardless of my license. If you are asked to call in a distress signal by a pilot or ship captain in an emergency, you are in the clear.

Before you start calling on the radio, make sure any emergency distress beacons are activated. Ships should have an EPIRB available – never go on open water without one. Planes can set their transponder into distress mode. If you are going into the wilderness, it is probably a good idea to carry a personal distress beacon and familiarize yourself with other distress signals.

The first thing to understand is that radios are not like phones. You need to select the frequency/channel. For marine radio, you want channel 16 (156.8 MHz), for an airplane you want 121.5 MHz. If you are on a distress channel, do not talk over another person. Once you get a hold of someone, they will likely ask you to change to another channel if you can, just in case you are not the only one having a really bad day.

Mayday! Water Safety

 

It is time for our annual summer safety briefing, a week before Memorial Day weekend. Multiple deaths from drowning have already made the news, and we know there will be more preventable deaths. The American military has a long tradition of weekly safety briefings, with the contents shifting with the season and occasion. Listen up, this is your water safety briefing for National Drowning Prevention Month.

May is National Drowning Prevention Awareness Month, but in the Valley, three children have already drowned in May.

Old Guys Rule on a Late May Day

 

crossed golf clubsPhil Mickelson, at the age of 50, beat a crowd of younger players on a ocean-side wind-swept PGA Championship course this Sunday. Mickelson’s last major championship was the 2013 British Open. That was his fifth major championship. Now, Phil Mickelson has joined the elite 13 golfers with six major championships in the entire history of the PGA. And. Phil Mickelson has won one for the old guys, blowing away the next oldest winner by two years. The three oldest major PGA championship winners were:

Julius Boros 1968 PGA Championship 48 years, 4 months, 18 days
Tom Morris Sr. 1867 The Open Championship 46 years, 3 months, 10 days
Jack Nicklaus 1986 Masters Tournament 46 years, 2 months, 23 days

Mickelson has consistently played professional tour-level golf for the past quarter-century. Yet, his time as a champion seemed long past. Now, Phil has done what a 53-year-old Greg Norman, leading the 2008 British Open field on Sunday morning, could not do. Phil Mickelson won with the roar of the crowd in his ears, protected by tournament staff from being mobbed by golf fans on the last two holes. No, the crowd in South Carolina was not muzzled with face diapers, and this group of Americans was not showing any sign of signifying obedience to the evil Dr. Fraudci.

At age 50, Phil Mickelson became the oldest player to win a major, holding on for a two-shot victory in the PGA Championship at the Ocean Course at Kiawah Island on Sunday.

Member Post

 

The Catholic school I and my brothers attended made a pretty big deal out of May Day. Students made “Mary Baskets” instead of May Baskets, and filled them with handmade paper flowers and crafts that we’d created during the previous week. The entire school (grades K-8) attended Mass in the morning, said the rosary, and […]

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Member Post

 

It was a bit of silliness that provoked me to sign up for The May Days theme.  I thought of of my great-grandmother, Anna Dey.  Quite a few Deys had come to the United States. I have no idea which ones might have come from the same set of German villages on the Vistula River […]

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April Showers Bring May… Geese?

 

May is definitely the most adorable time of year where I’m from, because that’s when our little local goose family shows up! It’s so fun seeing them waddle around together and watching the babies learn how to swim. Bonus: the mom will hiss at you if you get too close! Please enjoy these recent photos; I pulled over on the side of the road to take them, and then the car behind me did the same instead of going around me. The little goose family is well-loved around here. ☺️

May 1944: Detroit and the Future

 

In the weeks before D Day, there was already unfounded optimism that the war in Europe would be over by Christmas, and that without the Germans, the Japanese would fold quickly. So at the top levels of American government and business, there was a shift of attention towards the postwar period, even if nobody knew exactly how soon that would arrive. War Production Board regulators approved Detroit’s request to build the first new civilian trucks since they ceased production in 1942. But automobile companies weren’t allowed to restart car assembly lines, not until VE Day arrived.

The verdict of the financial experts was bleak: the dislocation caused by reconversion from war to civilian production, plus 11 million men returning to the labor force, was almost certain to cause another Depression. It looked like we were going back to the hunger and strife of the Thirties. With many of our best and brightest convinced that the Fifties was shaping up to be a poverty-stricken, drab and colorless decade, in the last year of WWII Ford and General Motors launched programs to build small, spartan cars that would retail at the lowest possible price. They would have been big Detroit’s first real “compact cars”.

Group Writing: The Earth Turned

 

It’s been a pretty cold May so far – though a shade warmer than what was, apparently, a cold April – at least compared to recent years. And such seeds as I have sown in pots are pretty generally only tentatively peeking out from beneath the soil – don’t I know it’s cold out there? Still, the sun shines through occasionally, and while it was doing so yesterday I went out and did a spot of digging and cultivating, which did me and the garden good.

On the windowsill (it’s a fairly big windowsill), I’ve got tagetes ‘Lemon Gem’ and a nice single French Marigold called ‘Naughty Marietta’ (I didn’t pick the name – but they’re nice Marigolds that I’ve grown before), which have germinated, and Michaelmas daisies (which are starting to) and heleniums and helichrysums (strawflowers) and things, that are, so far, shy about putting in an appearance. Par for the course, thus far, it seems.

The Best Gift I Ever Got

 

Last weekend I traveled to my mom’s house for a visit. The only thing unusual about this was the fact that it was the first time I’d seen her in more than a year; it was the resumption of a long-standing tradition, a tradition that the pandemic had suspended. May 14 is my birthday, which means that it always falls close to Mother’s Day (sometimes even on the same day). So, long ago, I established the habit of an annual mid-May visit for a joint celebration of the two occasions.

I’ve always thought the conjunction of these two May days was appropriate, because they are two sides of the same coin. Of course, I didn’t realize that when I was a kid; back then, my birthday was all about me, about getting older and getting a bunch of presents. But now I realize that I am not the person who deserves recognition on that day: where my birth is concerned, I had the easy part. More to the point, I no longer expect any gifts from my mom, because I have come to understand how very much she has already given me.

Member Post

 

There are lots of open days in the month of May. Stop by soonest to add your blooming ideas, nipping my next disco post in the bud. There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim […]

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May Garden Memories

 

My mother’s garden has been a feature of every place we called home. Once my parents settled into the home where they retired, almost the entire yard became gardens, with each section planted so that there would be something happening throughout the year in the Pacific Northwest. What follows is a small sampling of photographs from the past decade or two. 

My folks had a significant portion of a concrete patio ripped out shortly after they took ownership of their house, leaving a covered patio off the family/TV/media room and enough uncovered space for Dad’s charcoal grilling. Much of that uncovered chunk was turned into a tiered potted garden, with a variety of colors and shapes of foliage. Yes, that is a greenhouse/garden shed in the left background. We kids put the garden shed together one summer early on, from a prefabricated kit. It has stood going on three decades of rain and wind. The orientation lets Mom start plants in the late winter, so she, with the assistance of her undergardener (Dad) can get them into the ground at the earliest safe date.

May 9: A Day to Remember My Father

 

A few days ago a post about Great Courses reminded me that one of the Great Courses had led me to the Blasket Island Writers and then to a visit to the Great Blasket Island on 1 May 2019. I had recently written a post on it for another forum and thought I should polish it up a little and post it here as a May topic. It would be easy, and I would get it posted on time. Unfortunately, after I had already committed to writing a post for May 9, I remembered that I had already done that topic here.

What to do? What to do? May 9 is a big holiday in Russia, marking the end of the War in Europe. Here in the United States V-E day is May 8, but the time zone difference made it May 9 in Russia. But I don’t have anything to tell about that topic, other than to note that a young woman vlogger from Russia was recently complaining that International Woman’s Day had degenerated from a celebration of progressive Feminist Ideals to a generic celebration of women and femininity, and Victory Day (May 9) had degenerated to a generic masculine men’s day.

Answering a Floral Mayday (M-1)

 

There is a reason I’ve been delaying this piece until the floral mania is over.  This was not a normal M-Day, this was basically a floral mayday call.  The reason will become rapidly apparent if you have read my previous posts.

This year, the crew was the Steel Rose; lead florist and fearless leader, Silence; IT guy and assistant manager (and son of Steel Rose), a new assistant florist from a family of florists – let’s call her Bumblebee, myself, and an old friend of mine and coworker, who is a safety professional and ordained minister – let’s call him the Rev.  We also had a former bank teller for half a day Thursday.   That’s it.  The bottled water delivery guy who offered to show up was a no-show.  This was the leanest crew they had ever run with – the Rev and I did 90% of the deliveries.

A Day in May

 

Janet on our wedding day.

It was a day in May, 43 years ago. I did not realize it at the time, but it would be the most important day of my life, save for the day I entered my life. Not because it was the best day of my life, or the happiest day. Rather it was the day that led to the best and happiest days of my life and equally inexorably to the saddest and worst day of my life.

On May 7, 1977, I married my spouse of over 40 years, Janet. Longtime members of Ricochet might remember her as Quilter.

Member Post

 

There are lots of open days in the month of May. Stop by soonest to add your blooming ideas, nipping my next disco post in the bud. There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim […]

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Member Post

 

Montana Journal Entry: May 12, 2008. My daughter A. was six and made Mother’s Day memorable for me–but not in the way she expected.  It dawned on me how much A. delighted in celebrations of any sort when she was a chubby toddler, not two yet. We were at a friend’s birthday party and the […]

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May Day Down by Law

 

ConstitutionMay 1st, May Day, is formally recognized in the United States as Law Day, not Workers Day, and certainly not International Workers Day. We successfully rejected the left’s class warfare agenda for a century because of the reality of American law, grounded in our foundational law, the Constitution of the United States of America. Because of our reasonable reliance on a system of laws, not men, we observed that economic status was not fixed from birth, so the weeds of envy could not take deep root on American soil. That is why the left both set about subverting our system of law and creating a different basis for division, hate, and envy.

The effort to make May Day a class-based workers holiday was driven by the early socialist movement:

In 1889 an international federation of socialist groups and trade unions designated May 1 as a day in support of workers, in commemoration of the Haymarket Riot in Chicago (1886). Five years later, U.S. Pres. Grover Cleveland, uneasy with the socialist origins of Workers’ Day, signed legislation to make Labor Day—already held in some states on the first Monday of September—the official U.S. holiday in honour of workers. Canada followed suit not long afterward.

Member Post

 

This May we will play off of three or more meanings of “May” and “day.” Ricochet members, founding or first time subscribers, AND especially the reticent or keyboard shy, are heartily encouraged to join in our group writing project this month. Each month, Ricochet members like you share a few thoughts, a bit of knowledge […]

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