Tag: May Days

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It’s been a pretty cold May so far – though a shade warmer than what was, apparently, a cold April – at least compared to recent years. And such seeds as I have sown in pots are pretty generally only tentatively peeking out from beneath the soil – don’t I know it’s cold out there? […]

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Last weekend I traveled to my mom’s house for a visit. The only thing unusual about this was the fact that it was the first time I’d seen her in more than a year; it was the resumption of a long-standing tradition, a tradition that the pandemic had suspended. Today (May 14) is my birthday, […]

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There are lots of open days in the month of May. Stop by soonest to add your blooming ideas, nipping my next disco post in the bud. There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim […]

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May Garden Memories

 

My mother’s garden has been a feature of every place we called home. Once my parents settled into the home where they retired, almost the entire yard became gardens, with each section planted so that there would be something happening throughout the year in the Pacific Northwest. What follows is a small sampling of photographs from the past decade or two. 

My folks had a significant portion of a concrete patio ripped out shortly after they took ownership of their house, leaving a covered patio off the family/TV/media room and enough uncovered space for Dad’s charcoal grilling. Much of that uncovered chunk was turned into a tiered potted garden, with a variety of colors and shapes of foliage. Yes, that is a greenhouse/garden shed in the left background. We kids put the garden shed together one summer early on, from a prefabricated kit. It has stood going on three decades of rain and wind. The orientation lets Mom start plants in the late winter, so she, with the assistance of her undergardener (Dad) can get them into the ground at the earliest safe date.

May 9: A Day to Remember My Father

 

A few days ago a post about Great Courses reminded me that one of the Great Courses had led me to the Blasket Island Writers and then to a visit to the Great Blasket Island on 1 May 2019. I had recently written a post on it for another forum and thought I should polish it up a little and post it here as a May topic. It would be easy, and I would get it posted on time. Unfortunately, after I had already committed to writing a post for May 9, I remembered that I had already done that topic here.

What to do? What to do? May 9 is a big holiday in Russia, marking the end of the War in Europe. Here in the United States V-E day is May 8, but the time zone difference made it May 9 in Russia. But I don’t have anything to tell about that topic, other than to note that a young woman vlogger from Russia was recently complaining that International Woman’s Day had degenerated from a celebration of progressive Feminist Ideals to a generic celebration of women and femininity, and Victory Day (May 9) had degenerated to a generic masculine men’s day.

Answering a Floral Mayday (M-1)

 

There is a reason I’ve been delaying this piece until the floral mania is over.  This was not a normal M-Day, this was basically a floral mayday call.  The reason will become rapidly apparent if you have read my previous posts.

This year, the crew was the Steel Rose; lead florist and fearless leader, Silence; IT guy and assistant manager (and son of Steel Rose), a new assistant florist from a family of florists – let’s call her Bumblebee, myself, and an old friend of mine and coworker, who is a safety professional and ordained minister – let’s call him the Rev.  We also had a former bank teller for half a day Thursday.   That’s it.  The bottled water delivery guy who offered to show up was a no-show.  This was the leanest crew they had ever run with – the Rev and I did 90% of the deliveries.

A Day in May

 

Janet on our wedding day.

It was a day in May, 43 years ago. I did not realize it at the time, but it would be the most important day of my life, save for the day I entered my life. Not because it was the best day of my life, or the happiest day. Rather it was the day that led to the best and happiest days of my life and equally inexorably to the saddest and worst day of my life.

On May 7, 1977, I married my spouse of over 40 years, Janet. Longtime members of Ricochet might remember her as Quilter.

Member Post

 

There are lots of open days in the month of May. Stop by soonest to add your blooming ideas, nipping my next disco post in the bud. There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim […]

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Montana Journal Entry: May 12, 2008. My daughter A. was six and made Mother’s Day memorable for me–but not in the way she expected.  It dawned on me how much A. delighted in celebrations of any sort when she was a chubby toddler, not two yet. We were at a friend’s birthday party and the […]

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May Day Down by Law

 

ConstitutionMay 1st, May Day, is formally recognized in the United States as Law Day, not Workers Day, and certainly not International Workers Day. We successfully rejected the left’s class warfare agenda for a century because of the reality of American law, grounded in our foundational law, the Constitution of the United States of America. Because of our reasonable reliance on a system of laws, not men, we observed that economic status was not fixed from birth, so the weeds of envy could not take deep root on American soil. That is why the left both set about subverting our system of law and creating a different basis for division, hate, and envy.

The effort to make May Day a class-based workers holiday was driven by the early socialist movement:

In 1889 an international federation of socialist groups and trade unions designated May 1 as a day in support of workers, in commemoration of the Haymarket Riot in Chicago (1886). Five years later, U.S. Pres. Grover Cleveland, uneasy with the socialist origins of Workers’ Day, signed legislation to make Labor Day—already held in some states on the first Monday of September—the official U.S. holiday in honour of workers. Canada followed suit not long afterward.

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This May we will play off of three or more meanings of “May” and “day.” Ricochet members, founding or first time subscribers, AND especially the reticent or keyboard shy, are heartily encouraged to join in our group writing project this month. Each month, Ricochet members like you share a few thoughts, a bit of knowledge […]

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