Tag: Mass Shootings

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According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), a mass murder occurs when at least four people are murdered, not including the shooter, over a relatively short period of time during a single incident. Over the last 30 years, the United States has seen a significant increase in mass shootings, which are becoming more frequent and more deadly. Seemingly […]

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One of our Resistance Library readers reached out to us recently and shared a BBC article that they found interesting. They said it reminded them of our piece Prescription For Violence: The Corresponding Rise of Antidepressants, SSRIs & Mass Shootings and thought it supported some of the connections made there.   They’ve been linked to road rage, pathological gambling, and […]

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The story hardly needs telling yet again. We have all seen the movies, documentaries, read the books, visited the inumerable websites. For my purpose, though, some essential facts need repeating. The night of April 15, 1912, RMS Titanic is speeding across the North Atlantic at 23 knots (26.14 mph, or for the metrically impaired, 42.1 […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have mixed reactions to the news that West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin is not going to run for governor of his state in 2020 and will remain in the Senate until 2024. They also shudder at the obvious warning signs surrounding the latest mass shooter in Texas and wonder why so few people did anything about them. And they roll their eyes as Beto O’Rourke insists he would ban AR-15’s and similar weapons and force gun owners to sell them to the government.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Israeli Lessons for Mass Shootings

 

The recent mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, have given rise to an anguished national discussion over how to best respond to domestic terror. There is an aching awareness that punishing individual criminals after the fact is, to invoke the famous Churchill phrase, too little, too late. The social objective is to prevent these useless deaths from ever happening, which is why choosing the proper mix of preventive measures is rightly the central topic of debate.

Yet it is precisely on these questions that people who share a common end have the greatest disagreement. There is no single metric that can determine the optimal strategy for harm prevention. But that does not stop the introduction of a vast number of ingenious approaches to solve the problem. Today, most of the proposed solutions are top-down. They seek to prevent violent individuals from getting their hands on guns, often forgetting that determined killers can resort to cars, bombs, and even knives. My approach is the opposite. Any mass killer is a random outlier whom it is rarely possible to identify in advance. I think that it is impossible to do anything more that will prevent these people, or indeed anyone else intent on wreaking havoc, from obtaining weapons.

The only strategy that has a fair chance of success to reduce, but never stop, all mass killings, starts from the opposite end. It is beyond dispute that gunmen utilize the element of surprise. It has long been known that most of the death and destruction of a mass shooting takes place before any police or security team has time to arrive. Killers open the door and they start shooting: no warning, no mercy, no pause. Speed is the essence of any police response. Better that a single officer enter the fray immediately than wait even ten seconds before reinforcements can pitch in.

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In light of the recent shootings in El Paso and Dayton, John McCormack has an article in National Review discussing Federal “red-flag” legislation, which would allow family members to obtain a court order to take firearms away from people who are showing symptoms of behavior that could lead to violence against themselves or others. This […]

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A friend (a liberalish Millenial, while I’m a Gen-X right-winger) posted this on his Facebook wall; I found it interesting & thought provoking, so thought I’d share it here. Thoughts? Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Odium Mundi

 

What, exactly, motivates someone to waltz into a public place and gun down scores of innocent people he’s never met?

Well, that may be the wrong question. In the shooter’s mind, there are no innocents — only sinners and reprobates of all kinds; jerks, dunces, philanderers, drunkards, and bullies. That 16-year-old grocery bagger might seem nice enough, but he likes to torture the nerds at school — and, besides, he stole the girl I fancy. That 36-year-old mother of two may look innocent, but she’s actually part of an ethnic invasion which seeks to destroy the country as we know it. Et cetera. For people who think this way, each killing is an act of revenge against a world the shooter believes has wronged him. It is, in his warped and woeful understanding, a type of justice.

But lobbing projectiles into an unsuspecting crowd is only the most spectacular form of revenge (and the form preferred by the most deranged). Hatred of the world manifests in other ways, too. Politics overflows with it — plebeians and public officials alike bathing in a stew of pity and entitlement. Envy, once among the deadliest of sins, has become the sine qua non of modern political life, and it now underpins the system of ethics accepted by most American elites. (What is “distributive justice” if not envy repackaged?) Across the country and the world, people brand themselves with tribal regalia (“I’m ugly, but my tattoo makes me beautiful!”) and adopt various artificial identities (be they transgenderism or something else), all in an attempt to thumb their noses at an order of being in which they seem to have no place. (Those who think that the prevailing message in society is “Be happy!” haven’t turned on the television lately.) And, worst of all, nobody is immune. Much as I dislike crowds, I’ve no interest in slaughtering them. But am I content with my life? Am I free from resentment? No. And perhaps I shouldn’t expect to be.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America wade through a very somber day on the Three Martini Lunch. They recoil at two horrific weekend mass shootings – one in Texas and another in Ohio – and where we stand as nation. They also evaluate how President Trump is responding and not responding to the heinous killings and how Democrats are pointing the finger of blame squarely at Trump. And, after being away last week, Greg comments on the passing of his father and the legacy his dad leaves behind.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Guns Aren’t the Problem. We Are the Problem.

 

Guns are not the problem. We are the problem.

If you look at the Wikipedia page about mass shootings in the US, you will find that five out of the seven accepted causes are psychological and cultural. Five. Out of Seven. Even they recognize that gun accessibility is only worth two points of discussion.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Columbine High School Could Be Demolished: Is That a Wise Decision?

 

Every school shooting is a catastrophe. For every child that dies, a family is severely wounded. Many school districts have taken steps to to protect their children:

In 2016, the CDC found nearly 90 percent of public schools had a written plan for responding to school shootings, and 70 percent of those schools had drilled students on the plan.

Regarding the Columbine High School mass shooting, many steps were taken to make the school more secure. But in the eyes of some, those actions do not respond sufficiently to the situation.

Max Eden joins Seth Barron to discuss recent mass shootings in American high schools and how misguided approaches to school safety can play a role.

In the aftermath of horrific shootings at high schools in Florida and Texas, the political debate has focused largely on the role of guns in American society. Mostly ignored is how school districts fail to take action on students with documented histories of threats, violence, or mental illness.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How to Survive an Active Shooter

 

I am part of the Employee Safety Committee for my work area. A big part of our responsibility has been training staff in what to do during attacks on our facility. Included in the training are presentations by the security supervisors, videos, posters, and tabletop simulations. As part of this, I produced a memo outlining procedures for our specific unit. After the event in Florida, a resident MD (who is active-duty military with combat experience) and I updated the guide. I left some descriptions of specific locations in our area as an example; these, of course, are not applicable to every workplace.

With Las Vegas, Kentucky, and Florida in the news, I’m again going to address a scary possibility: An active shooter in the hospital. We all should have had the class from Security and have seen the posters. You, therefore, know the strategy: Run, Hide, Fight. I will be discussing the specific tactics for our department.

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I know it’s been a long time since I did anything on Ricochet. Life has been difficult lately but the tide has turned as it usually does. Hope you like this. Thoreau wrote “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” You may remember something about their song dying inside them as well. Thoreau […]

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Last February President Trump rescinded one of Obama’s executive orders regarding gun control. Basically, Obama ordered the Social Security Administration to report people who were no longer in control of their finances to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System that Trump chose to nullify. I can’t imagine why he did this or why Congress supported […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Gun Control and the “Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc” Fallacy

 

It always irks me when I read an article about the supposed effect of a policy change, say a gun ban in the UK or Australia, by looking at the effect on some variable (gun deaths, mass shootings, etc.) after the legislation was passed. The problem is that you can mistakenly conclude a causal relationship between the policy and its impact when none exists. It’s the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy, “after this, therefore, because of this.”

As an economics major, I learned that you still need a control and treatment group when dealing with time series, just like you would with cross-sectional data. Other majors, I’m sure, were taught the same thing. We’re familiar with the example of a drug trial, for example, where you find two groups of people that are identical in almost every way and give one group the drug (say, to reduce blood pressure). Ideally, if you see the blood pressure levels drop in the treatment group then you’re confident it’s the result of the drug.

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There have been seven mass shootings (so far) in 2017. By comparison, between 1980 and 1989, there were only eight mass shootings. Preview Open

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In discussions of mass shootings the standard rebuttal to a ban on “assault weapons” is that other guns have the same ammunition capacity, rates of fire, etc., or that even more destruction could be wrought with another type of weapon like a bomb. That’s true: the two deadliest school attacks in US history were committed with handguns (Virginia Tech, 2007) […]

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Over the past week you’ve undoubtedly read stories or tweets about how “mass shootings” claim more lives than terrorist attacks or that they happen more than once per day in 2015. I know my Facebook feed is clogged with waiters, bartenders, and college dropouts* who know exactly how to end the epidemic of mass shootings […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Shooting from the Hip

 

shutterstock_10465210By now, you’ve likely heard of yesterday’s shooting in California. I generally don’t delve into the news on these mass shootings and I feel no particular desire to do so here. I’m sorry for the people hurt but — if it’s remote from me — I remember that it’s a big world with a lot of evil, and I don’t have to feel personally involved in all of it.

But I’ve noticed something about both the reactions by the news and by other people to attacks: when the public reaction to the attack could be aimed against your “side” on some issue — generally because the attacker fits your demographic slot in one way or another — there’s a tension and awkwardness about discussing the attack itself. When the public reaction could go against the other side, then there’s an enthusiasm for every snippet of information or wild speculation.

Consider the reactions to yesterday’s shooting and those to the one at the Planned Parenthood clinic last week. To the Left, the latter was an opportunity to slam people who are anti-abortion, as well as the famous undercover exposés that brought the subject back to public attention. In the California massacre, I expect a lot will be made of the religion of the two attackers, and that will make fodder for the debates over admitting Syrian refugees.