Tag: masks

Fauci: “Nothing stops. Or am I being obtuse?”

 

The nation’s highest paid federal employee issued a stern warning to all Americans on Monday, stating that the long-awaited vaccines against COVID-19 won’t alter the long-term necessity of masks, school closures, lockdowns, and social distancing measures.

Responding to a question from a reporter about the possibility of relaxing restrictions once a majority of Americans have been vaccinated against the coronavirus, Dr. Fauci replied “Nothing stops. Nothing! Or you will do the hardest time there is. No more protections from the Bill of Rights. I’ll pull you out of that one-bunk Hilton and cast you down with the New York nursing home residents. Wearing a mask is too onerous? I’ll make you wear three – and throw in a charcoal filter just for giggles.”

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin is opposing the nomination of Neera Tanden, President Biden’s choice for budget director, and two of the most moderate Republicans are already saying they’re voting against her as well. They also hammer California Democrat Ro Khanna, after the congressman says he doesn’t want small businesses that cannot afford to pay $15 per hour. And they follow the insane evolution of “the experts,” who are now saying that you will need to wear a mask long after the bulk of the population has been vaccinated.

Join Jim and Greg as they credit Ohio Sen. Rob Portman for exposing the nastiness of Neera Tanden, President Biden’s choice to lead the Office of Management and Budget. They also groan as the World Health Organization comes to the precise conclusion about the COVID outbreak that China wanted – after China restricted the evidence available for examination. And they roll their eyes as Tampa Mayor Jane Caston expects police to hunt down people who did not wear masks while celebrating the Super Bowl.

 

Member Post

 

Joe Biden’s puppeteers realize that distributing a vaccine is really hard work! So until they can manage to vaccinate us all, their solution to saving the country from the Wuhan Flu is this: “Let’s send masks to every American!” Because I guess not enough of us have been wearing masks for the last year. There […]

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Overton Window: You Should Wear 4 Masks

 

On February 27, 2020, CDC Director Robert Redfield was asked at a hearing Capitol Hill whether healthy people should wear a face covering. His answer? “No.”

Two days later, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams went full Trump – never go full Trump – and tweeted “STOP BUYING MASKS!”, claiming they are “NOT effective in preventing (the) general public from catching coronavirus.”

On March 8, the government’s leading expert on infectious diseases, the un-fireable Anthony Fauci said “there’s no reason to be walking around with a mask”.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome some of the most radical leftist mayors finally running out of patience with teachers’ unions who refuse to agree to in-person education. They also discuss Liz Cheney surviving as chair of the GOP House Conference and what the right way is to navigate the Marjorie Taylor Greene soap opera. And they hammer the Biden administration for considering a plan to mail masks to every American.

Munchkin Coroner: Wicked Witch Died of Covid

 

Munchkinland – According to Munchkinland coroner Dweebnic McPhallanx III, the widely-despised Wicked Witch of the East died of complications related to COVID-19. At an impromptu press conference where the old bat’s corpse was prominently displayed, the 712-year-old McPhallanx stated, “As coroner, I must aver, having thoroughly examined her, that she’s not only merely dead she’s really quite sincerely dead.”

As the county seat of the Land of Oz, Munchkinland officials reserved the right to ensure that the daft shrew from hell — who was frequently seen without a mask — was legally, morally, ethically, spiritually, physically, positively, absolutely, undeniably, and reliably dead.

The coroner’s announcement put to rest a widely-held conspiracy theory that the death of the vicious hag had to do with a frigging house landing on her dome.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a federal judge striking down President Biden’s attempted 100-day moratorium on deportations. They also lay out the many reasons the Democrats’ push for D.C. statehood is a terrible idea. And they have plenty to say about the new push for people to wear two masks and China claiming anal swab COVID tests are more accurate.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss President Biden’s paltry goals in ramping up vaccine distribution. They also hammer CNN for falsely reporting that the Trump administration had no vaccine plan and that the Biden team was starting over from scratch. And they discuss the very weak response from the White House about Biden not wearing a mask on federal land just hours after insisting that everyone must do it.

Life in a Zoo

 

It was an eerie and uneasy time for us. My husband and I decided to get away and we went to St. Petersburg to stay for a couple of days. The first day was bathed in the warm sunlight of fall, and was perfect weather for touring Zoo Tampa, where we had never been. We had watched the care of the animals on TV and thought it would be fun to become acquainted in person.

Aside from the sunny day, however, much of our visit seemed somehow off. We were hungry when we got there, so we went into the cavernous café near the zoo entrance near noontime. Hardly anyone else was there. Everyone was masked up when they weren’t eating.

When we started touring the zoo, one of the first enclosures had a single tiger in it. We watched as he paced from side to side in one portion where there were rocks for him to walk on. I wondered if his behavior would be considered normal. Later I asked a staff person about it, and she said he was probably waiting for his meal. Maybe so.

Join Jim and Greg as they credit Republicans for keeping a treasure trove of opposition research on Raphael Warnock quiet until the Georgia Senate runoff. Now they are highlighting Warnock’s radical statements on many different issues. They also walk through a number of burdensome new COVID restrictions, including Pennsylvania’s requirement to wear masks in your own home if you have guests, and contrast that with politicians like California Gov. Gavin Newsom who don’t think the rules apply to them. And they get a kick out of watching Bernie Sanders supporters become deeply disappointed with Joe Biden as he names corporate figures to most positions in his inner circle.

Member Post

 

I don’t have a strong opinion on the value of masks. It seems to me that since OR doctors and attendants have worn them for decades (and not just to hide their coffee breath at 6:30 am surgeries) they must have efficacy. So the argument being that they protect the other guy somewhat is reasonable. […]

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Halloween and the Monster Pandemic: The HARM of Universal Masking

 

I live in a very red state now, apparently redder than Georgia and Texas. I live in a neighborhood that I love because there are small homes with neatly mowed lawns near old mansions with roman columns. You could say this area meets the progressive definition of “diverse,” which cares only about neighbors having different hues as they sit on their front porches, as people still do here. But it meets my definition of “diverse,” too, because there are Trump flags galore and Biden/Harris signs staked in the grass, and no one disturbs anyone else’s stuff.

The truth is that I rejoice on almost every run through these streets littered with leaves about how plainly American this very mixed neighborhood feels because it’s plain to me that these families have different incomes, different demographics, different opinions, and it is fine. This is a reflection of the country I grew up loving. Unlike the hyper blue bubble of Austin that I recently began to find so suffocating that I had to leave it behind me, this place feels normal.

The Glorious Sights of 2020

 

I do a lot of local travel. This means, in this time of coronavirus (when McDonald’s bathrooms are no longer as reliable as they once were), that I visit many rest stops. The scene at every rest stop is much the same:

A carload of pre-masked people pulls into a parking space. They disembark, mask their way up the pathway to the bathrooms, finish their business, mask themselves back to their car, pile in, and mask away into the sunset.

Member Post

 

Yet another Ricochet member giving her take on these issues. I just hear things that burrow into my brain, and they incubate and hatch in a poorly timed post. 1.) Joe Biden’s DNC nomination speech: NPR was broadcasting bits of his speech and “analyzing” it. Their tone revealed how deeply serious and deep his deep […]

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Local Montanans Decide They’re Done Wearing Masks

 

I first noticed the pattern when picking up my cheese pizza at Little Caesar’s. Signs were everywhere: “Due to the Coronavirus, we are asking that you not wait in the lobby.” “Due to the governor’s order, masks are required for entry into this establishment.” With a little intake of breath, I realized I’d left my mask in the car. Then I saw that no one behind the counter was wearing a mask. Neither was the other customer, a man waiting casually in the lobby for his special order. The next time I got a hankering for pizza, I noticed the same thing. Montanans in our town are just finished with the mask mandate, and certain establishments and their clientele have tacitly agreed that going maskless is fine.

If I had a graph of mask compliance around here, it would show a steep, narrow curve. It’d start with about a third of locals in the stores wearing them, often older women and workers. Before the governor made the order, there were national guidelines, and probably some state and county recommendations, too, so we all had the feeling we were supposed to be wearing them. But the mask wearers stood out. And then the governor gave the order in July, some weeks after our re-opening, enforced through the businesses. Everyone was masked, and one of my friends told a story about being ordered out of a coffee shop after protesting she had a health condition, and told never to return. My graph shoots up to about 98%.

Mask Wearing: Must it Be So Complicated?

 

While some people comply with wearing masks with a degree of resignation, others are angry and frustrated when required to wear them, as the controversy about the need to wear them drags on. But for some families, mask-wearing is especially difficult for certain children with autism. I suspect that other conditions also create emotional and physical difficulties when wearing masks. In particular, the Ross family with a seven-year old daughter with sensory processing disorder as a result of her autism traveled to Disney World.

Understanding a little more about sensory processing disorder might be helpful. The condition and its manifestations can vary from child to child, and includes (but isn’t limited to) not wanting to be touched, eating only certain foods, wearing only particular clothes or cutting the tags out of their clothes, or having meltdowns in crowded public places. As an example, a balloon popped when the Ross family were at a local fair and the daughter was triggered and ran into a four-lane highway nearby. The potential for this extreme behavior requires ongoing management.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer police in Oregon for vowing to pull back from parts of Portland after the local prosecutor refuses to press charges against rioters. They also slam Joe Biden for suggesting everyone needs to wear a mask outside of their homes regardless of the circumstances and for insisting on it for the next three months. And they vehemently disagree with New York City’s decision to cancel this year’s powerful 9/11 blue light display over COVID concerns.