Tag: Marvel Cinematic Universe

The guys tackle Captain Marvel. Does Sonny think Wonder Woman is better? Vic takes a movie bathroom break. JVL witnesses a dishwashing atrocity. Sonny and Vic explain drinking games to JVL.

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Ant-Man and the Wasp

 

  Direction by Peyton Reed Screenplay by Chris McKenna & Erik Sommers and Paul Rudd & Andrew Barrer & Gabriel Ferrari “Well, the ’60s were fun, but now I’m paying for it.” – Stan Lee   More

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RIP Stan Lee — Comic Great and Cameo Favorite

 
Stan Lee
Photo by shutterstock.com

As I noted in an earlier post, Stan Lee, Marvel giant, co-creator of many of its titles and constant cameo in many of the Marvel Cinematic Universe films has passed away today at the age of ninety-five. He and Jack Kirby began Marvel Comics in 1961 with its first title, The Fantastic Four, and went on to create some of the most iconic characters in the genre: Spider-Man, the Hulk, and the X-Men as well as many others: Doctor Strange, Black Panther, and collaborated in the creation of Iron Man, Thor, and Ant-Man.

Stan Lee was born Stanley Martin Lieber in Manhattan, New York City. Even in his youth he wrote and began his comic career with Timely Comics which would later evolve to Marvel. Stan Lee served in the military during World War II in the US Army where his talents were eventually applied to training films and materials.

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Daredevil 3 Is Magnificent

 

It might be the best crime/superhero drama since The Dark Knight. It’s standard practice in sequels and in second and third seasons to resort to gimmicks like extra blood or adding a bunch of F-words or more sex. Instead, the makers of Daredevil resorted to dialing back on the sex, slit throats, and S-words and instead telling […]

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The Daily Standard is Wrong about Everything!

 

Charlie Sykes is a good guy. He means well. He’s sincere and cares deeply about civility. In case you’re new to planet earth that means I’m about to say something mean about old Chuck. Of the various center right podcasters running around in the wild woods of the web he stands apart with an uncanny […]

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The Doctor Strange Plan Revealed

 

Warning: Potentially spoiler-heavy thread! It’s simple, really: Earth’s economy will collapse after half of us die, Stark will show Thanos how bad it is, Thanos will learn that Malthusian economic theory is wrong, and he’ll just undo everything. More

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Black Panther

 

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America and Marvel, Part V: Genres and Their Reflection on American Society

 

I will close this series with two brief explanations of how genre itself involves reflections on American society. I have recently been working on horror movies, so that is one of my examples. American horror comes down to two versions of an attack on progress. One is Christian — Hitchcock did it, his many imitators since John Carpenter do it, and endless others. These stories try to put together the universal and the particular in this way. They start with a social setting that is very broad and designed to show what’s happening with American freedom. They then move on to an individual story of the emergence of evil. How crazily implausible evil has become, and how maddening, therefore, is supposed to teach the audience that they didn’t see evil in the setting. The unwillingness of good respectable middle-class Americans to see the evil in their hearts, and therefore in their society, leads them to countenance or even provoke monstrous things.

The tragic poet in this case resorts to these shocking things rightly called horror on the assumption that nothing else will even get a hearing. This is also what David Lynch wants to teach Americans; or Neil LaBute. These are very sophisticated movie-makers, but they are basically Christian moralists. They mean to remind Americans that you can stop believing in God, but you can’t stop believing in evil. Instead of providence, you get God’s wrath.

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America and Marvel, Part IV: Show Business and the Marvel Identity

 

Let us now see how all this emerges from show business. The box office seems to be growing exclusively on the strength of pricier tickets, as fewer people go to the movies. Fewer movies are made every year, counting movies with any kind of broad release — not 4,000 theaters, but say more than 500. The number of studios and the number of sources for stories are also decreasing. In the business, the idea is called intellectual property. In that sense, a minuscule oligarchy sells what a massive democracy wants to buy. The view of America you get at the movies is concentrating, ignoring more and more of the country. So, let us look at what we buy or, rather, buy into, while only really renting.

Today, cinema is dominated by three genres:

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America and Marvel, Part III: The Role of Cinema

 

I will start with some eminently questionable remarks. Let us start from the place of cinema in American life. Americans are notorious for the great gap their society leaves open in-between personal, private experiences, particular to each one and interesting mostly to himself — and public debates or public discourse, which is dominated by abstractions.

Tocqueville famously said Americans are uniquely given to general ideas — whenever doubt should arise about anything, a principle will be stated with god-like certainty. What lies in-between the abstract or universal and the personal or particular is judgment. Judgment, in both common senses of the word, is frowned upon in America. Obviously, moral judgment is frowned upon because it is a form of discrimination and the ground and mode of discrimination — it also odors of inequality, as he who judges necessarily sets himself the superior of he whom he judges. But judgment offends not merely equality — it also offends independence, or individualism.

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America and Marvel, Part II: Reflections of and on Society

 

A few days ago, I talked to my associate Prof. Harmon who raised a fundamental question by way of a preposition. This is not as rare an occurrence as you might think. He asked whether I meant to speak of American cinema as a reflection of American society or a reflection on it. As I said, the movies are our human way of seeing what we’re like, as humans. But what does that mean more clearly?

“Reflections of society” involves the obvious meaning of imitation. What you see on the screen is what the movie-makers saw looking around — America. But this could mean two different things, being that no movie can reflect America as a whole. American movie-makers might offer Americans the images they think will please them — they see what Americans approve, and are governed in their works by that experience. This would mean cinema is a kind of flattery; a barely concealed form of self-congratulation. Every theater-going experience is really an awards ceremony in disguise. There is more than a little truth to that. Do people leave the theaters of this great notion in a soul-searching mood, somewhat chastened by the experience, or rather smug, and even self-important?

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America and Marvel, Part I: Introduction

 

At first, this series may seem strange to you. All I can say by way of preparatory remarks is that cinema properly understood is the self-understanding of a society. It comprises individual taste, popular phenomena, prestige, and also great achievements. It is at once all-American and almost universally opposed in America. Cinema is part of civilization — it is an attempt to think through and therefore to educate Americans about what it means to be a human being. But it retains elements of barbarism — a surprising fondness for images, let’s say.

Cinema is remarkably democratic in that it shows us the bodies of human beings whom we instantly recognize, with all the moral and intellectual consequences that follow from that knowledge. But it is also aristocratic, in that it privileges stories which are impressive by reason of being unusual — we generally look for great beauty, great power, or great achievements in stories. Or at any rate, cinema inevitably produces celebrities, the most obvious form of inequality in America.

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Collecting Comic Book Movies and a Guardian’s of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review.

 

In talking to various nerd and geeks I have come to observe that there are two sorts of comic book fandom. The first is one that gravitates to particular artists and specific story lines. These sorts of fans gravitate to miniseries and graphic novels, like “The Dark Knight Returns”, “Watchmen”, or “V for Vendetta”. The […]

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Doctor Strange: A Movie Riview

 

Doctor Strange is the latest installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, starring Benedict Cumberbatch (the actor who portrayed mathematician Alan Turing in The Imitation Game and plays Sherlock Holmes on the BBC TV series of the same name). So far this movie has received very positive reviews with a 90% fresh flavor on Rotten Tomatoes, so […]

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C. S. Lewis on the Battlestar Galactica: The Tao of Science Fiction

 

Continuing a series on the topic of (and in support of the book I’m editing by the same name) Science Fiction Film and the Abolition of Man. (Previous entries here and link.) Our book is divided into three parts corresponding to the three parts of Lewis’ book The Abolition of Man. Part II is “The Way.” […]

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