Tag: Marco Rubio

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

;P I stayed home, sick, from my home office yesterday, and I had a lot of time to browse and catch up on things. One of them left me shaken to my core. Marco Rubio had become a fascist. Well, fascist would be too much of an ugly exaggeration, but he certainly advocates for dictatorship […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. American Compass? No, I’d Rather Stay Lost.

 

A recent National Review article is titled “The Return of Conservative Economics.” When a politician or a political writer says his great new idea is “conservative,” grab your wallet and run the other way as fast as you can. Not only will it not be conservative, it will likely be daft — and accompanied by the force of law. The NRO article is a perfect example of this. It opens with:

Today we are announcing the formation of American Compass, an organization dedicated to helping American conservatism recover from its chronic case of market fundamentalism. In preparation, we have been perusing the mission statements of many of our nation’s think tanks. Nearly every group has one. Oddly, the right-of-center’s preeminent public-policy institutions all have the same one: to advance the principles of “limited government, free enterprise, and individual liberty” or “free markets and limited, effective government” or “free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom” or “individual liberty, limited government, free markets” or “economic choice and individual responsibility” or “individual, economic, and political freedom; private enterprise; and representative government.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Make Florida Great Again

 

President Trump has been very busy this weekend in Florida. On Friday, he honored Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, with a second proper presidential farewell and send-off, as he had done for Ambassador Nikki Haley. Earlier in the day, he appeared with Florida officials and the Corps of Engineers on the shore of Lake Okeechobee, highlighting an important infrastructure project.

Lake Okeechobee is a large freshwater lake described as the heart or the kidney of Florida. It is girded by a dike system, which has been in long-standing need of repair. The US Army Corps of Engineers has federal responsibility, as with other large waterways.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. BDS Linked to Terrorist Organizations

 

The Boycott-Divest-Sanctions (BDS) Movement has a fairly recent history in the US for its ugly organized hatred of Israel. The organization wrongly characterizes Israel as an apartheid state and spreads lies about Israel’s history and right to the land. Most people who are critical of the BDS movement are aware that it is also an anti-Semitic organization.

Recently, the Israeli Ministry of Strategic Affairs released a report that shows BDS is not only actively working against Israel, but it has infiltrated NGOs (non-government organizations) in order to take actions against Israel and to raise funds for its activities. The report describes 100 specific alleged links between BDS and terrorists, particularly Hamas and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP):

Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio calling out ballot counting irregularities in Broward and Palm Beach counties in the race between Rick Scott and Bill Nelson. Both counties are in clear violation of canvassing law and both Rubio and Scott are convinced that Democrats are trying to steal the election after the two counties suddenly discovered nearly 100,000 new ballots, the overwhelming majority of which are for Democrats. And Alexandra sounds off on the latest hypocrisy from New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand.

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There was a lot of enthusiasm for Marco Rubio in the conservative establishment, mainly because his name was Marco Rubio. A Hispanic Republican from a purple state who could talk like Ronald Reagan and vote like John McCain was just what the Establishment wanted. It was also thought his pedigree would grease the skids for […]

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud President Trump for hosting a dignified event on school shootings that included a wide variety of opinions from many anguished families. They also slam CNN for letting it’s town hall on guns turn into an endless onslaught against Marco Rubio, because he will not support an “assault weapons” ban, with one student even telling Rubio he feels like he’s looking at the shooter or down the barrel of an AR-15 when he sees Rubio. And they shake their heads at the news “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek is scheduled to moderate a debate later this year in the Pennsylvania governor’s race.

Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer the family leave plan pushed by Sen. Marco Rubio and Ivanka Trump to allow parents to tap their future Social Security checks to cover the weeks surrounding the birth of a new baby in exchange for waiting extra weeks when they reach retirement. In addition, Alexandra rebuts the liberal insistence that family leave must be a whole new entitlement. They also slam Republicans for effectively surrendering the option to use budget reconciliation for the next two years as part of the horrific budget deal with Democrats. And they fire back at Republican lawmakers who spent Thursday trashing Sen. Rand Paul’s filibuster as a waste of time, when those GOP members are really just mad that Sen. Paul called them out for their blatant hypocrisy on deficit spending and not wanting to take a vote on restoring budget caps.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud President Trump for making good on his efforts to eliminate and postpone costly and burdensome federal regulations. They also tense up as five different Senate GOP votes could be in jeopardy as vote nears on tax reform. They shake their heads as liberals lose their minds and predict an internet wasteland after the Federal Communications Commission votes to return internet regulations to where they were two years ago. And Jim offers a spoiler-free look at the new Star Wars movie.

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Unlike a lot of people on here, I’m not a fan of Marco Rubio. I wouldn’t be voting for him, but on the other hand, I am pretty sure there’s no video anywhere of Marco Rubio talking about grabbing women by the hoo-hoo-dilly. I do think he can consider himself the presume frontrunner for 2020, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Why No Trump Congress?

 

As you’ve likely heard, Senators Marco Rubio and John McCain coasted to significant victories last night in their respective primaries, in much the same way that Speaker Paul Ryan easily bested his Trumpian challenger earlier in the month. As Charles C. W. Cooke writes writes on NRO, this suggests an obvious question:

In Arizona last night, John McCain beat his primary opponent by ten points. McCain was a key member of the “Gang of Eight.” He has a reputation as a “squish.” He has been an elected official since 1982. Why weren’t these figures swept away? How, in this “climate,” could they possibly have won? Where was the “anger”; the “frustration”; the “revolt”? Back in 2010, the Tea Party became a credible movement because it actually got its candidates nominated — and elected. What, other than benefit briefly from a perfect storm, has the Trump Party done?

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. A Thought Experiment: Inspired by Sen. Rubio

 

shutterstock_314009114Senator Marco Rubio is back in the news thanks to his decision to seek reelection for his Florida senate seat. From the beginning of this election cycle, I was ambivalent toward him as a presidential prospect and the ambivalence remains to this day. Simply put, Rubio’s talents qualify him well for some parts of the presidency, but poorly for others. From the start, I’ve felt that he would make the perfect head of state. An eloquent public speaker, clear eyed about America’s role in the world and with the bi-partisan instincts needed to function as a truly national figure, the Florida senator would be uniquely well suited as the face of the American Republic. And as much as conservatives shun this kind of thinking, Rubio’s ethnicity and family history would add a certain symbolic value.

Symbolism, however, is the key and therein lies the problem. Due to the Founders’ inability to predict the rise of the imperial presidency, we are left with a unitary executive that combines the functions of a head of state and head of government. To the former office, Rubio would excel; to the latter, his thin resume and proclivity to “work across the aisle” — as well as his somewhat shaky conservatism on domestic issues — would be far less well-suited. Our country is greatly polarized and precious few of our problems will be solved without a nasty partisan fight, the kind that would pose a major obstacle to any would-be unifying figure attempting to represent America abroad with a united voice. For the job of head of government, the present moment requires not just a true conservative, but also a leader who does not mind being hated, perhaps even one capable of reveling in his own unpopularity. A certain Texas senator — ironically, of similar ethnic heritage — comes to mind.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Marco Rubio Will Run for Reelection

 

rubio marcoMarco Rubio announced this morning in a Facebook posting that he has decided to run for reelection to retain his Florida senate seat in the U.S. Congress. Acknowledging that he was reversing his own repeated statements that he would not run for reelection, Rubio wrote:

In politics, admitting you’ve changed your mind is not something most people like to do. But here it goes. I have decided to seek reelection to the United States Senate.
I understand my opponents will try to use this decision to score political points against me. Have at it. Because I have never claimed to be perfect, or to have all the answers. Still, the people of Florida deserve to know why I’ve changed my mind.

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And the hits just keep on coming, from Jeb operatives against Rubio and his fans in the media. Here are some reasons Right to Rise’s Luke Thompson says Rubio lost: “Rubio had no home base outside of The Weekly Standard break room.” Read More View Post

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This is how you do it. From Marco Rubio, via Facebook: While Republican voters have chosen Donald Trump as the presumptive GOP nominee, my previously stated reservations about his campaign and concerns with many of his policies remain unchanged. He will be best served by a running mate and by surrogates who fully embrace his […]

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Exhibit A: Marco Rubio Since leaving the presidential race, Marco Rubio has basically been out of the national limelight. He’s been busy working on a number of issues in the Senate and hasn’t said too much about the ongoing primary process. Recently, though, Rubio has done a few interviews in which he was asked some […]

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I am a political junkie, and I am completely exhausted by the circus that is the 2016 GOP primary. Back in early 2015, 2016 couldn’t come soon enough. That is our bench? Those are our candidates? An abundance of qualified, articulate, conservative-in-various-forms candidates. This was going to be unbelievable. Read More View Post

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Cruz News You Can Use

 
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Rich Koele / Shutterstock.com

With only three candidates left in the race, only two of whom have a numerically plausible path to the nomination, we should be reaching the clarifying stages of this election. And if the polling is to be believed, that’s exactly what’s happening.

The most recent polls listed by RCP all show Donald Trump leading in winner-take-all Arizona by double-digits. It’s hard to see how it goes otherwise. Senator Ted Cruz is poised to win neighboring Utah by an even larger margin; it’s possible he may win a majority and with it all of the state’s delegates. If he fails to win a majority, the delegates will be assigned proportionally, although the details are absurdly complicated. So we’re likely looking at a night that ends with Trump increasing his lead on Cruz by at least 18 delegates, though probably not much more than that. It may yet be enough to deny Trump a majority, but it’ll be a close call.