Tag: Lyndon Johnson

In this episode, Dave Carter turns the tables on Whiskey Politics’ proprietor and frequent Real Side Radio host Dave Sussman by interviewing the guy who is usually asking questions of others. Along the way we learn that the current mass exit of people from the progressive utopia of California means that, A) U-Haul trucks are impossible to reserve, and B) too many of California’s evacuees bring their political beliefs with them and end up voting for the same policies that wrecked the place they left. The two Daves also discuss voter trends in the African American community and the prospects for the Biden Campaign, before moving on to speculate on the best way to deal with rioters and protestors who block public roads.

Dave also welcomes Ricochet Charter Member Brian Watt to discuss his recent articles addressing the similarities of the 2020 presidential election with the elections of 1968 and 1972, before explaining how the election could be derailed or even hijacked by mail-in ballot mischief.  We believe you’ll find the discussion, and the entire podcast for that matter, fascinating and entertaining.

Amity Shlaes discusses the economic history of the 1960s and the efforts of Presidents Johnson and Nixon to eradicate poverty—the subjects of her just-published book, Great Society: A New History.

The 1960s were a momentous period, from the Civil Rights Movement to the Vietnam War, but Shlaes’s book focuses on the incredibly ambitious government programs of the era, which expanded the social safety net beyond anything contemplated before. Overall, the Great Society programs, Shlaes writes, came “close enough to socialism to cause economic tragedy.” Great Society is a powerful follow-up to her earlier book, The Forgotten Man, about the Great Depression and the 1930s.

Selma Won’t Win an Oscar Because of Democrat Distortions

 

Martin_Luther_King,_Jr._and_Lyndon_Johnson_3God cannot alter the past, though historians can. Samuel Butler

The movie Selma is about Dr. Martin Luther King’s march from Selma to Montgomery to help the Voting Rights Act get passed. It’s a good movie, but there is one major historical inaccuracy and one major historical omission.

The antagonist to Dr. King in the movie is President Johnson, who is shown trying everything to stop the march, even underhanded and unseemly things involving the FBI. Transcripts of talks between LBJ and King, however, show that LBJ not only supported King’s agitations, he encouraged them.