Tag: Love

A Hand Holding Back a Tidal Wave

 

A story crossed my email from Crisis Magazine worth reading.  It presents the life of a lowly servant in the trenches – holding up a hand against evil, trying to protect an enormous flock of young, abused girls in Mexico.  The powerful hand is attached to the body of a thin, older priest named Father Dan Leary. Here is an excerpt:

A single American priest, Fr. Dan Leary, has worked seventeen-hour days the past several weeks to spiritually and mentally prepare the teenage girls for what might await them in some of the most dangerous towns in the world. Long hours are not uncommon to Fr. Leary; he has no days off. Seventeen- and eighteen-hour days are standard.

The girls have learned how to protect themselves against the evil ones; they’ve been sent out as warriors who understand the spiritual battle,” Fr. Leary said. “They have exorcised water and salt. They will be praying their rosaries on break; they’ll be walking to daily Mass in their villages, they will be in prayer. They know God is with them to protect them, moment by moment.

Stories: Reflecting on Things That Matter

 

Well … I was very excited to start a series of posts inspired by A.W. Tozer, but I’ve had to suspend the effort for now. No, not my continued reading or the inspiration his work instills … just the writing about it. With any good grace from the Almighty, the publishers will grant my request to leverage excerpts and quotes as necessary, keeping all to a minimum while properly citing those that I feel must be included. It will take four to six weeks for them to get back to me, likely with a “No,” but we will see. Now I wait.

Oddly, one of those publishers I made inquiry to pursued me as an author about ten years ago, asking that I write a book about emotional abandonment. I don’t know what prompted such a strange request, but before I could get into the work, my assigned acquisition editor was laid off and the project died.

What a relief, right?

Member Post

 

We have a 24/7 classical music station, via public broadcasting, and on late Sunday afternoons, a wonderful program comes on.  It highlights young classical musicians from all walks of life.  They sheepishly talk about their influences, inspiration for the piece they are presenting (sometimes written by themselves), while sharing their culture and challenges. The host […]

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Quote of the Day: Grief and Love

 

“Grief is the price of love, but it is love that makes the world go round, or at least one of the most important things that make life worth living. Love and the moral sense complicate life greatly, and make it difficult for most of us, for without them there would be no grief or any apprehension of evil; but without them we should be little different, conceptually, from an amoeba under a microscope.” – Theodore Dalrymple

Today is my 45th anniversary. It is the fifth one I have spent without Janet, my wife of 40 years, but despite her death, it is still our anniversary. I still miss her deeply and remember her in my daily prayers. I will go to her grave today and give her flowers. (Something I could never do while she lived due to her allergies.)

Member Post

 

Do you love someone? How do you tell him that you love him? Love is one of the most potent feelings a person can feel. Almost everyone loves the feeling of being in love. There are words to express this feeling, be it English or any other language. And today I am introducing you to […]

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Member Post

 

I love courageous people. So often, I feel challenged about taking personal risks, and rediscover my own courage when I learn the stories of people who put their own reputations on the line, who don’t let personal attacks and criticism stop them, and who serve as models for all of us. I decided to write […]

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Men, Women, and Emotions (Reprise)

 

Knowing that men and women are different does not prevent me from taking issue with the simplistic contrasts floating around in our culture: women share their trials to vent, while men want to fix things; men are task-oriented, while women are people-oriented; men talk to give information, while women gab to feel connected. Both sexes laughingly accept these descriptions, but I think further examination warrants refinement of our understanding. Even when there is a degree of truth in distinguishing between men and women this way, clinging too firmly to rough categories can prevent us from truly understanding one another. Also—dare I say it—sometimes descriptions like this give mature, capable women far too little credit.

Take, for example, the cultural idea that women are emotional creatures, while men are more likely to operate from logic. At first glance, this makes sense. When we draw conclusions from what we observe, we often see women more vulnerable to tears, expressions of affection, and conversation about true feelings. In latter years, we’ve been more open about discussing how hormones can affect women’s behavior. On the other hand, we often see men thriving in careers that demand cool logic—programming, engineering, architecture. Men like facts, as opposed to emphasizing feelings.

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It was the tagline that got me: “The bag your children will fight over when you’re dead.” I remember roaring in laughter when I first read that in 2009. I was in the market for a strong, long-lasting leather bag to carry books, papers, and computer for teaching. I stopped my search when I came […]

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Group Writing: A Tirade on Hate

 

Hate is like a blood-sucking leech; it attaches to your psyche without your even noticing it. Over time, it draws the energy from your life, mostly in the background. If you don’t pay attention to it, it can suck every ounce of joy right out of you.

I’m about to let hate ruin my life. I don’t seem to be able to help myself. If I acknowledge its presence and drive this hate out of my heart and mind, maybe there’s hope. So here goes…

Member Post

 

I haven’t been busy here on Ricochet even though I continually think of things I’d like to write about. It’s because I’ve been really busy in real life. I’m just telling you this because I feel like you’re an extended family. My husband has been in and out of (mostly in) the hospital during September, […]

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On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” author and relationship coach Suzanne Venker joins Federalist Executive Editor Joy Pullmann to discuss her new book “How to Get Hitched (and Stay Hitched): A 12-Step Program for Marriage-Minded Women” and how to navigate marriage in a world with historic levels of singleness.

Quote of the Day: For Better or for Worse

 

Marriage is an alliance entered into by a man who can’t sleep with the window shut, and a woman who can’t sleep with the window open. —George Bernard Shaw

On so many levels, this quotation calls out for recognition—and a guffaw– if you’ve been married more than one week. When we first marry, we are basking in the glow of love, dreams, possibilities, and the future. And then reality hits, and we realize that marriage isn’t as glamorous as we expected.

It’s better.

Member Post

 

My Bible tells me to love my neighbor as myself. I follow that as best as I can. I do not hate others. But I do not think that love means approval of whatever another wants to do. Sometimes approval ought to be withheld because it would countenance wrongdoing. I contend that saying that something […]

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Quote of the Day: “Grief is the Price We Pay For Love”

 

These words were spoken by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, to the family members of those who perished on September 11, 2001. And I’ve often thought she must have been channeling C.S. Lewis at the time:

To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.–C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves

It’s a theme that Lewis fleshed out some more in his reflection on the death of his wife, the American poet Joy Davidman, in the short memoir, A Grief Observed.

Stand-up comic, Erica Rhodes, stops in to trade stories with Bridget about their various adventures that always seemed to start with “there was a boy…”. They discuss the winding roads that brought them to comedy, why spoken word poetry is a lot harder than you might think, acting as a gateway drug, the joys of creativity, the embarrassment of journals full of men, and their struggles with love and commitment. They also cover therapists who flirt with you, the nightmare of online dating, Bridget’s “one headshot per couple” rule, Erica’s tactic of playing dumb which allows her to see who people really are, losing people close to you, searching for validation, and why what you think you want in a relationship is very different from what you actually need in a relationship. Don’t miss Erica’s new comedy special La Vie En Rhodes.

Love Thy Neighbor

 

It is when we have the most cause to hate and reject our neighbors that we most need to remember the command to love them. Yes, my fellow Christians, it is a command and not merely an invitation. Though no challenge could be so difficult to fulfill, it is the foundation rather than the pinnacle of Christian love. It is a challenge not reserved only for the holiest saints but rather put to every one of us. Our Lord and Creator doesn’t even stop there. “Love thy neighbor as thy self.”

A philosophy professor and friend once caught me off guard by claiming that the Golden Rule is nothing special. Any person raised in a good home knows not to mistreat others as oneself doesn’t want to be abused.

Member Post

 

While I believe most people are shocked and upset by yesterday’s events at our Capitol, we have to keep our wits and move forward. We cannot control the behavior of others and events that come and go, beyond our control.  This includes yesterday’s breach of the Capitol in Washington, DC.  I’ll give my thoughts briefly, […]

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Quote of the Day: Love and Hate

 

“I know there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that.” – Tom Lehrer

Tom Lehrer spoke these words ironically, as a joke. Yet it has become a progressive mantra in the last few years. Some businesses post signs saying words to the effect that they love everyone – haters stay out. Progressives post signs on their lawns proclaiming “Love Trumps Hate,” while hating Trump and anyone who does not actively hate Trump. They claim saying “all lives matter” is racist, without attempting to explain logically how that can be true. They say “love is the answer” while slamming the door in the face of anyone who might point out that is not necessarily always true.