Tag: Los Angeles

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http://dashboard.publichealth.lacounty.gov/covid19_surveillance_dashboard/ If you click on Table: Cases/Death by Date, you will see that 7 day daily death average on August 28 is 17 which matches the number on April 3 Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The California Homeless Urban Brushfire Fire Season Begins

 
Vacant lot on residential street near Downtown Los Angeles set ablaze after homeless encampment catches fire on the night of August 19, 2020.

As the only member of my family living in California – specifically, Los Angeles – I have to deal with the common misconceptions of the state: No, one does not go up to celebrities and start talking to them, even just to say how much one likes their work. No, locals generally don’t go to Hollywood; it’s an overpriced, touristy hellscape of traffic with no parking. And no, even if one does go to the beach (many don’t – that hellscape of traffic with no parking thing again), people only swim on the hottest days because the ocean here is icy cold.

But what I find myself having to correct most often is no, those dramatic wildfires on the news are nowhere near me. I live a mile outside of Downtown LA in a dense, urbanized area, and there are no sections of hills and brushlands near me to go up in flames. What they are seeing is always either in the hills where the wealthy have homes or the suburbs so far from me that I won’t see the smoke until and unless it burns so long that it dissipates into a choking, carbon-scented haze that drifts over the Santa Monica Mountains and hangs over the Los Angeles Basin.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Urban Un-Renewal: After Coronavirus and Black Lives Matter, Has the Bubble Burst in Downtown L.A.?

 
The Frank Putnam Flint monument on the south lawn of Los Angeles City Hall, facing the Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters, covered in anti-police graffiti. – 6/21/20

Despite decades of flagrant political and fiscal mismanagement, the cities along California’s coast have flourished. Even with the looming threat of unpaid liabilities to civil servants’ unions, an unrelenting drought, and a wave of homelessness that has swept down upon San Francisco and Los Angeles like the zombie apocalypse, nothing seemed to stop the push to develop more and more. The jeremiads against gentrification have grown louder and more desperate every year as, in L.A., more formerly poor and minority-dominated neighborhoods saw craft beer shops and vegan bakeries open among the 99¢ stores and check-cashing outlets. Nowhere was more symbolic of the success that Downtown L.A. itself: At the start of the millennium, the city’s historic and financial core was a ghost town after 6 P.M. and on weekends, its streets becoming eerie canyon of shuttered storefronts devoid even of the homeless.

When you realize that there actually are worse ideas than “President Bernie Sanders”: Graffiti in Los Angeles. – 6/27/20

By 2010, the area had begun roaring to life with trendy bars and restaurants, and retailers looking to project a certain bleeding-edge cool began locating there. By the start of 2020, Vans and Nike’s Jumpman brand had built flagship stores on the historic Broadway corridor, while Apple was underway transforming the Tower Theater into one of its new lifestyle concept destinations.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Future of Our Cities

 

Buildings on Hamilton Avenue, Detroit.
In 1968, in the wake of the assassination of Martin Luther King, a great many American cities were engulfed by riots. In one such city – Detroit – the mayor, a well-meaning liberal Democrat named Jerome Cavanaugh, made a fateful decision to rein in the police and let the riot burn itself out. To his judgment, the state’s governor – George Romney – deferred, and the riots went on for five full days. “Burn, baby, burn,” they said. And burn it did.

Eighteen years before, Detroit had been the richest city in the United States – with a per capita income exceeding that in every other urban area in the country. By 1968, it was no longer so well situated. But it was prosperous. It was vibrant. The architecture was stunning; the churches, beautiful; the picture palaces, a wonder.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Let’s Gas Up at the Gas-a-Teria!

 
Gilmore Gas-a-Teria at night 1948

In 1948, the first self-serve gas station was opened in the United States. The station was in Los Angeles, the car capital of the country, on Beverly Boulevard just past Fairfax Avenue and was operated by Gilmore Oil. Gilmore Oil was a large, local oil and gas company well known in southern California. Gilmore called these self-service stations “Gas-a-Teria’s”. The Gas-a-Teria was a massive station for the time featuring eight islands with three pumps per island. The self-serve gas saved the customer five cents per gallon and the attendants at the station were young women.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer one certain Republican win in a congressional election on Tuesday and a likely win in another, but also wonder what a national election based mostly on voting by mail will look like. They also slam officials in Los Angeles County for announcing the stay-at-home order is being extended for another three months. And they blast CNN for booking Greta Thunberg to be an expert guest for its coronavirus town hall.

Christopher Rufo joins Brian Anderson to discuss drug addiction and homelessness in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Skid Row, the subject of Rufo’s story from the Winter 2020 Issue of City Journal, “The Moral Crisis of Skid Row.”

“They call Los Angeles the City of Angels,” writes Rufo, “but it seems that even here, within the five-by-ten-block area of Skid Row, the city contains an entire cosmology—angels and demons, sinners and saints, plagues and treatments.” To address the growing public-health crisis, progressive activists and political leaders have relied on two major policies: “harm reduction” and “housing first.” But despite nearly $1 billion in new spending, more people are on the streets than ever—and the crime and addiction are getting worse.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. California History: The Ridge Route

 
Grapevine Grade looking north of original Ridge Route. Note this is Tejon Pass, not Tehachapi Pass

Early in my engineering career, I used to drive what was and still is colloquially called “the grapevine” to and from work every day for about five years. In fact, I rarely did drive the actual grapevine. I lived in Castaic , which is located in Los Angeles County at the southern end of the Tejon Pass, and worked on construction projects in the Gorman area and so drove I-5 “up the hill” and “down the hill” between these two points. The grapevine is the name for the grade at the northern portion of the Tejon Pass, which is in Kern County and connects Los Angeles with northern California.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. On ‘Saint’ Nipsey Hussle, an Alternative View

 

My most recent contribution over at PJ Media concerns what I believe to be the inordinate adulation shown to slain rapper Nipsey Hussle. Hussle, whose true name was Ermias Asghedom, was shot to death on March 31 outside the clothing store he owned in Los Angeles. Eric Holder (no, not that one) has been arrested and charged with murder in the case.

On April 11, Hussle’s funeral was held before an audience of 21,000 in LA’s Staples Center, making him the second person so honored. (The first was Michael Jackson; make of that what you will.) After the funeral, Hussle’s hearse led a chaotic procession on a 25-mile tour of South Los Angeles, a tour which, as I noted in the piece, scarcely passed a single block that hadn’t been the scene of at least one murder in the last 20 years. LAPD brass called the event a success when only four people were shot (one fatally) and only four police cars were vandalized.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Hidden Costs of the LA Teachers Strike

 

The recent teachers strike in Los Angeles was resolved on terms that have generally been regarded as a victory for the teachers against the embattled Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The LAUSD is financially strapped because of ever heavier pension obligations for retired teachers and high operating expenses. Nonetheless, the LAUSD capitulated to the demands of the teachers union, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT). It agreed to a 6% pay raise for the teachers to be phased in over two years, and class size was reduced by two students per class. The District also vowed to beef up its employee base by hiring 300 nurses, 82 librarians, and 17 counselors by 2020.

LA mayor Eric Garcetti, who has higher political ambitions, crowed: “When we see a problem, we fix it.” AFT President Randi Weingarten noted optimistically, “Everything teachers are demanding would strengthen public schools.” Going out on strike, she said, was about “ensuring that all public schools have the conditions they need for student success.” But those remarks, as Jason Riley of the Wall Street Journal notes, must be taken with a large gain of salt, for self-interest offers a better explanation of the AFT’s strategy than its supposed altruism. The AFT thought that its gambit was worthwhile for its members, but a closer look at the settlement shows that in the long-run, the union teachers got less than they hoped for, while everyone else lost big time.

This week Bridget Phetasy interviews Rosie Moss, actress, waitress, Bar/Bat Mitzvah coach, Hebrew school teacher, very busy human. Rosie shares her first experience on a network show in an episode of The Connors. She and Bridget discuss traversing the chasm between your dreams and reality, the curse of always wanting more, why the people you surround yourself with are what make you successful, and how touch football saved her.

Former NYPD and LAPD commissioner William J. Bratton joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss Bratton’s 40-plus-year career in law enforcement, the lessons learned in New York and Los Angeles, and the challenges facing American police.

Bratton began his career in Boston, where he joined the police department in 1970 after serving three years in the U.S. Army’s Military Police during the Vietnam War. He was named chief of the New York City Transit Police in 1990, where he oversaw dramatic crime reductions in the subway system. In 1994, newly elected mayor Rudy Giuliani appointed Bratton commissioner of the NYPD. From 2002 to 2009, Bratton served as Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department. In 2014, he was again named New York City Police Commissioner by Mayor Bill de Blasio, before stepping down in 2016.

Steven Malanga joins Seth Barron to discuss the dismal economic and fiscal health of New Jersey, where individual and corporate taxes are among the highest in the country and business confidence ranks among the lowest of the 50 states. Jersey also has one of America’s worst-funded government-worker pension systems, which led its leaders in 2017 to divert state-lottery proceeds intended for K-12 and higher education to its pension system.

When Governor Phil Murphy wanted to boost taxes on individuals earning more than $1 million, he claimed that they needed to pay their “fair share.” Murphy signed a budget hiking taxes by about $440 million. But as the recent controversy surrounding a soccer team owned by the governor reminds us, it’s easy to show compassion when you’re using other people’s money.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Engineering Failures: St. Francis Dam

 
St. Francis Dam nearly full.

I’ve been fascinated by the St. Francis Dam failure since I first found out about it. For those who are unaware of or who’ve forgotten about it, the St Francis Dam failure, which occurred in 1928, was the greatest civil engineering failure in the United States in the 20th century (the Johnstown Flood killed many more people, but it took place in 1889), and except for the San Francisco Earthquake, caused more deaths than any other event in California history. Until recently, however, it was relatively hard to find much information on the topic. There was a book about the disaster by a local retired rancher, Charles Outland, who had been a high school senior in Santa Paula at the time the St Francis flood waters raged through town, which was published in the early 1960’s, but that was about it. Since then a couple more books have been published and an engineering professor who has extensively studied the failure and developed a detailed analysis thereof has written and given talks on the subject so that it’s now possible to flesh out the subject in great detail (I’ll provide links to the books at the end of this article; all other links will be in the text). The most interesting aspect of the story to me, however, is the way in which this event touches on and impacts so many other stories.

Los Angeles Aqueduct

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Homeless in LA

 

I work as the director of a faith-based homeless shelter. Housing First is the public policy idea that we should first build apartments where people can live, then worry about things like addictions and finding jobs. Case management is optional.

These homes will be centers of drug use, prostitution, and worse. The problems plaguing someone camping four blocks from where he grew up won’t be solved by Housing First because what makes people homeless isn’t the lack of a home. Homelessness is a symptom, not the disease, even in Los Angeles. My fair city of Boise, ID is the fastest-growing city in America. Guess where everyone’s from? People who are enough on the ball can do something about LA housing prices — and they’re doing it.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “I’m with Her,” One Year Later

 
With the recent news about rampant sexual abuse in Hollywood, I was reminded of my unposted article on Hillary’s ironic campaign slogan. One year later, this piece is now more pertinent than ever.

After a viral video showed looped footage of potential POTUS and Bosnian sniper dodger Hillary Clinton collapsing at the 9/11 Memorial in New York, her campaign proved her unequivocal ability to lead the free world by demonstrating she can open an unsealed jar of kosher dills on Jimmy Kimmel’s late-night enablerthon. Take that, conservatives and sexists! Hillary is woman, hear her Vlasic crunch!

Between ubiquitous Subaru and Pious Prius bumper stickers along with her sycophants screaming at those not as tolerant as them, we cannot escape three little words that The House of Sad came up with to grab her gender-centric voting block — “I’m With Her.” Congratulations Chappaqua, this may be the most accurate combination of nine letters ever to describe today’s Left.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. David Spady on LA, Stupid People, DACA, and the NFL

 

David SpadyDavid Spady returns to Whiskey Politics where we discuss if Los Angeles and California can afford the Olympics, the national debt just hit $20 trillion and all we got was this lousy t-shirt (what the heck are Republicans doing to reduce the debt?), Annenberg’s study showing just how stupid people really are, Trump, Pelosi, and Schumer, DACA, and tax reform. Will Trump get a bad deal, and is the Kaepernick effect causing lower ratings and empty stadiums?

David, who has 25 years of experience in media and political consulting, is the California state director of Americans for Prosperity. He also serves as government affairs adviser for Salem Media Group and provides strategic guidance to more than 35 radio talk shows including Larry Elder, Michael Medved, Hugh Hewitt, Dennis Prager, and others. Spady is a columnist for Townhall.com and produced a weekly video series called “Common Sense with David Spady.” He has appeared on numerous television news broadcasts, and his columns have been published in the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times and the Sacramento Bee, among others.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Sorry, LA, But You’re Hosting the Olympics

 
The new Olympics aquatics center in Rio de Janeiro, six months after the games.

On Monday, the International Olympics Committee “awarded” the 2024 Summer Games to Paris and the 2028 Summer Games to Los Angeles. The leaders of both cities were thrilled at the announcement, pointing to the honor, legacy, and other unmeasurable vagaries the Olympics will bring. But hosting the five-ring circus hasn’t worked out well in modern history:

“Like anything worth fighting for, this was a long journey,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said. “Little by little, we got a victory.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Los Angeles Says, “Goodbye, Columbus”

 

Today the Los Angeles City Council voted 14-1 to replace the celebration of Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. Thus, Los Angeles joins a number of other progressive cities including Phoenix, Portland, Seattle, Denver, Minneapolis, Berkeley, and Santa Cruz in kicking Christopher Columbus to the curb in favor of indigenous peoples. The Los Angeles effort was led by Councilman Mitch O’Farrell who is a proud member of the Wyandotte tribe.

I must admit I don’t fully understand the infantile fascination and celebration by progressives of societies and peoples described variously as Native American, Indigenous Peoples, Indians (politically incorrect) or Pre-Columbian Americans (PCA’s) as some sort of numinous people. Mr O’Farrell in making the case for this change stated the following;