Tag: Life Lessons

Member Post

 

Maybe you saw it on a mug: “Sailing is Life” or something similar. “Sailing” conjures images of serene moments in a sunset with calm seas all around. Racing a sailboat paints a different picture, and, if we may amend the statement, I must offer “Sailboat Racing is Life.” Let’s jump in with both feet. Choosing […]

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Life Lessons from Tom Brady? Well…. Maybe

 

Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers just beat the mighty Green Bay Packers and are on their way to Super Bowl 55; coincidentally being played this year in Tampa Bay. The Buccaneers have won one Super Bowl. Tom Brady has taken his teams to the Super Bowl nine times and won six. We were New England Patriots fans for over twenty years while living in Boston. We’ve been in Florida since 2003 and never thought Tom Brady (or Gronkowski) would relocate their careers and homes to Florida. I asked my husband this evening: Is it because Tom Brady is such a good football player? He said he’s more than that, he’s an exceptional athlete, one of those rare people that is not only a team player but excels in leadership.

I thought about that comment because I had just gotten off the phone with my older cousin in Las Vegas, who asked me if I had watched the Biden Inauguration and the program after. I said no, and let her talk. She gushed about how she taped it and wept through the whole thing, “the young poet and her words and hand gestures reduced me to tears”, she said, “how Lady Gaga sang the National Anthem while gazing with so much love at our flag, then there was Jennifer Lopez and Tom Hanks.” She said they were cathartic tears after four years of hell. I knew my cousin and her husband were very liberal, and I thought she knew I was conservative, but I let her have her moment and stayed silent.

20 Things To Do in Your Twenties

 
Someone I follow on Instagram posted a list of 20 things to do in your twenties. It got me thinking of my own experience and what I would encourage someone else to do. A couple of caveats are worth mentioning: I haven’t done all of these things, or at least not as much as I wish I did, looking back in hindsight. I also avoided putting in generic goals like “eat healthily” or “try new experiences.” Instead, I thought about the concrete things that someone can do that will inevitably lead to them accomplishing those goals. So, instead of “travel,” I include going to a state in a different time zone because it’s like the culture is going to be different and the experiences will change your view of the world.
What would you substitute? Give me a cut along with a replacement. I have a feeling we’re going to see some interesting edits.
1. Get out and stay out of debt
2. Build an emergency fund of $15,000
3. Open a Roth IRA
4. Become fluent in a foreign language
5. Read at least 12 books a year, 1 per month
6. Go on a camping trip for at least 1 week
7. Read the Bible in one year
8. Travel to a state in a different time zone
9. Travel to a foreign country
10. Change a dozen diapers
11. Practice public speaking
12. Read a piece of ancient literature
13. Master a musical instrument
14. Ride a sailboat
15. Fly in a GA (general aviation) aircraft
16. Go to the range
17. Find a mentor
18. Go on a spontaneous road trip, or do a cross-country road trip
19. Train for a (half) marathon
20. Volunteer to help kids and/or the elderly

Zeal Is Easy, Facts Are Hard

 

Tuesday was my father’s 80th birthday. You wouldn’t believe that, by the way, if you could meet him. I don’t believe it. I always thought “eighty” was pretty darn old but my father has me rethinking that now.

A few weeks ago, my little sister asked the whole family to email in our contributions for a birthday surprise she was putting together — a custom-made book full of favorite family photos accompanied by personal quotes about all the things we love and have learned from our “Pop.”

A Valentine from the Weird Girl

 

That’s me, at age 12, with hair too big to fit into a ponytail and an awkwardly chubby body that few fashionable outfits could cover or even forgive. They called me the weird kid, at school, and they weren’t necessarily wrong. At that age, I collected pins from US presidential elections, would rather talk to horses than people and hid in the bathroom almost every recess to listen to The Doors on my beat-up Sony Discman. I didn’t fit in any of the boxes and at that age — hell, at any age — the people around you can smell the oddity on your slightly panicked breath.

As most kids of my kind, I reacted to the situation by adopting a “screw you” attitude, and that was never as visible as on that dreadful day when popularity and attractiveness was being judged and measured. On Valentine’s Day every year, students would send roses to each other, to be delivered in class on full display to the other students. The popular girls would ooh and aah over the bunches of flowers that landed on their desks, while others, like myself, would loudly declare how silly and obsolete this phony holiday was and how we actively refused to participate in anything from dances to decorations.

Once I reached high school I finally caved, but as the world still wouldn’t comply and my appearance and personality still did not merit any roses, I foolishly decided to send some to myself. The plan was to change how everyone viewed me; to re-brand the weirdo if you will. But the execution did not exactly give the desired result.

Member Post

 

Some of you remember I sent out the Ricochet Giraffe Signal earlier this year. I had lost my job and was including Ricochet in my job-hunting networking. A subset of those folks may have noticed my participation on Ricochet has dropped over the last month. This was due to my working a full-time contract job […]

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This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Some of you remember I sent out the Ricochet Giraffe Signal earlier this year. I had lost my job and was including Ricochet in my job-hunting networking. A subset of those folks may have noticed my participation on Ricochet has dropped over the last month. This was due to my working a full-time contract job over […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

A Life Schematic or Just Winging It?

 

Were the most important decisions of your life all the result of cold, hard math? Or did you ever follow your gut?

How did those decisions turn out? Did your grand strategies collapse under unforeseeable circumstances? Did your enthusiasm for impulsive or intuitive commitments wane? Or have your preparations proved fertile? Have your feelings guided you to joyful, surprising experiences?

What to Say on a Daughter’s Graduation

 

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So what does a father say to a daughter as she leaves the world of black and white and enters that adult world of grey? Not much. After all, if she’s anything like I was at that age, she’s sure she knows gobs more than I will ever learn anyway. But I’ve got the pen, so here goes. 

It starts with Shakespeare: He had it right. “This above all: to thine own self be true.” Never forget that a person’s character is determined by her refusal to lie. 

Lefler’s Laws of Life—DC McAllister

 

Our fourth child is about to graduate from high school and will be heading off to my alma mater, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in the fall. I thought a fun graduation present would be a collection of pearls of wisdom to carry with her as she embarks on a new stage of life — one in which she’ll have to navigate between liberal professors rewriting history and frat boys trying to convince her they have noble intentions when they invite her back to the Pi Kappa Phi house for a “nightcap.”

I guess I could just give her a copy of Proverbs or George Washington’s Rules of Civility, but I’m a nerd at heart, so Ensign Robin Lefler’s essential laws of life from Star Trek Next Generation (“The Game”) came to mind.