Tag: Liberalism

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why the Biden Choice Seems So Unsettling

 

Elections come and go, but this one feels very different and disturbing. There are the obvious reasons that are and have been playing out before us including the suppression of voting standards, changing the rules in the eleventh hour, extending days of voting beyond Nov. 3rd, and the damaging “laptop” information. Yet…..it’s something more.

When Obama and Biden won in 2008, there was a mantra of hope and change. We had our first black president, and while I didn’t vote for Obama, I was not alarmed at the prospect of this new leadership. In fact, I thought he would be good for the black community as well as other minorities, and therefore, the country. I went back and read through Obama’s acceptance speech. He didn’t apologize for America, he championed it. He said we would rebuild brick by brick our broken cities. There was only the promise of better days for everyone – no exclusions.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Rachel Campos-Duffy joined Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the left’s long-time influence on children and how that is being revealed in today’s culture. Campos-Duffy is a Fox News Contributor and author of “Paloma Wants to Be Lady Freedom.”

Campos-Duffy argued that the greatest weapon to fight the left’s influence in American culture is intentional parenting. As liberalism is promoted subtly in every area of society from reality television to children’s books, she said, parents need to actively teach their children to nullify what they learn from the world.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Vermeule’s Gleeful Illiberal Legalism

 

Few have been brave enough to flesh out what the Ahmarist, or “anti-Frenchist,” vision of the common good should be. Some have said articulating specifics is beside the point, that Ahmarists’ refreshing achievement is unapologetically asserting a common good exists, even if they decline to say what, exactly, it is. And then, there are guys like Adrian Vermeule, writing in The Atlantic, brave enough, at least, to flesh out a vision of sorts. Vermeule calls it “common-good constitutionalism”, which he describes as “an illiberal legalism that is not ‘conservative’ at all, insofar as standard conservatism is content to play defensively within the procedural rules of the liberal order.” When Vermeule writes,

[U]nlike legal liberalism, common-good constitutionalism does not suffer from a horror of political domination and hierarchy, because it sees that law is parental, [emphasis added] a wise teacher and an inculcator of good habits. Just authority in rulers can be exercised for the good of subjects, if necessary even against the subjects’ own perceptions of what is best for them—perceptions that may change over time anyway, as the law teaches, habituates, and re-forms them. Subjects will come to thank the ruler whose legal strictures, possibly experienced at first as coercive, encourage subjects to form more authentic desires…

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Patrick Deneen’s Delusions

 

In the Wall Street Journal’s most recent “Weekend Interview” feature, columnist William McGurn spoke to Professor Patrick Deneen, a political theorist at Notre Dame, about his influential 2018 book Why Liberalism Has Failed. McGurn, himself a Notre Dame graduate, takes Deneen to task for selling the Founders “short” by supposedly exposing their weak moral and social foundations in his book. “Liberalism has failed,” Deneen provocatively claims, “not because it fell short, but because it was true to itself. It has failed because it has succeeded.”

In Deneen’s view basic liberalism necessarily goes astray because it treats the atomistic individual, shorn from his or her social and religious context, solely as a rights-bearing entity. Deneen thus attacks the Framers worldview with its strong protections of individual rights, free and fair elections, and an independent judiciary. Writing even before Trump was elected, Deneen argues that it is “evident to all that the political system is broken and social fabric is fraying, particularly as a growing gap between wealthy haves and left-behind have-nots increases, a hostile divide widens between faithful and secular peoples, and deep disagreement persists over America’s role in the world.”

It is one thing, however, to identify a broken social culture; it is quite another to offer a diagnosis and cure for the condition. Deneen does neither. The book’s flap description leads with its chin: “Of the three dominant ideologies of the twentieth century—fascism, communism, and liberalism—only the last remains.” Ridding the world of both fascism and communism will never come soon enough, given that both forms of government necessarily degenerate into police states. The same must be said today of socialism, which produces tyrannies in countries such as Russia, China, Cuba and Venezuela. Even the worst form of liberalism is far better than these mutant forms of social organization.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. An Open Letter to Mitt Romney

 

Dear Mr. Romney:

I read your opinion piece in The Washington Post under the interesting heading: “Democracy Dies in Darkness”. You called it: “The president shapes the public character of the nation. Trump’s character falls short.”

You say, “A president should demonstrate the essential qualities of honesty and integrity, and elevate the national discourse with comity and mutual respect. As a nation, we have been blessed with presidents who have called on the greatness of the American spirit. With the nation so divided, resentful and angry, presidential leadership in qualities of character is indispensable. And it is in this province where the incumbent’s shortfall has been most glaring.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Dennis Prager on the Self-Righteously Suicidal West and False Morality

 

For this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast, I had nationally syndicated radio host, columnist, author of numerous books, teacher, film producer and co-founder of PragerU, Dennis Prager, on the podcast to discuss among other things:

  • How Dennis Prager ended up a conservative as an Ivy League-educated Jewish intellectual from Brooklyn, New York — contrary to so many of his peers
  • How perceptions of human nature divide Left and Right
  • Whether government has filled the void of religion for the increasingly secular and progressive American coasts
  • How the good intentions that underlie Leftist policy prescriptions lead to horrendous outcomes — and emotion versus reason on the Left and Right
  • The false morality underlying European immigration policy with respect to the Muslim world, and Prager’s criticism of Jewish support of mass immigration consisting disproportionately of Jew-haters
  • The self-righteous suicidalism of the West
  • The Leftist bias of social media platforms and PragerU’s legal battle with YouTube/Google

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found, download the episode directly here or read the transcript here.

Member Post

 

No, it’s not Christmas as you might think. No, the day they hate the most is the Fourth of July. The Fourth of July is when American flags are unfurled all over the country and fly high. There are parades—real pride parades, picnics, barbeques, and fireworks. It’s a day when the people who make the […]

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At National Review Online, I write about Penn State University barring its Outing Club from doing what the club was created to do and has been doing for 98 years — off campus outings. The disallowed activities are less dangerous than many on-campus activities that students undertake daily. What gives? An excerpt: Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

“On the right, I think we’ve identified markers for people who have gone too far in their ideological presuppositions, and it looks to me like the marker we’ve identified is racial superiority. We know that things can go too far on the Right, and we know that things can go too far on the Left, […]

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After reading @simontemplar’s post, my hackles are up. I tried not to rend my clothes or pull my hair, but stay rational after reading in his post that George Washington University (note the name) is hosting a forum to combat “Christian Privilege.” I almost bit a hole in my lip. http://ricochet.com/508074/the-assault-on-western-civ-continues-unabated/  I’m sure this is […]

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This week on Banter, Dr. Yascha Mounk joined the show to discuss his new book, “The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It.” In his book, Mounk explains the rise of populism and its threats to liberal democracy, but also provides some practical solutions to turning that tide. Dr. Mounk is a lecturer on government at Harvard University, a senior fellow in the Political Reform program at New America, and executive director at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change. His research focuses on political theory and comparative politics. He participated in a book event at AEI with AEI’s Jonah Goldberg, Norm Ornstein, and Stan Veuger. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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I looked up the definition of mental illness on the Mayo Clinic’s web site (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mental-illness/symptoms-causes/syc-20374968). Although there’s not a single, concise definition, the list of signs and symptoms caught my eye: Examples of signs and symptoms [of mental illness] include: Preview Open

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This will be a relatively short piece, which I hope will stir some real thought. I thought of it this morning, when I heard the following story on my local, all-news radio station: It was announced that The Weather Channel co-founder, John Coleman, had died. He was 83. They then went to their own weather-man, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. All The Feels

 

There’s an interesting quote embedded in this interview with the leader of Canada’s Conservative party.

“I believe the problem with Liberals is that they don’t care about the results of their policies, they just care about the intentions that they show. They wrap themselves up in emotion and sending a signal about what they care about. The effects of their policies are usually terrible but they try to gloss over that.

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Last week, I published a list of liberal clichés and their real meanings. The style was, of course, based on The Devil’s Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce, while many of the entries were plagiarized from inspired by Jonah Goldberg’s The Tyranny of Clichés. I asked for ideas on further entries in the comments, and this addendum […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Loose Bull!

 

I hadn’t remembered that story in decades, but it resurfaced in a bizarre daydream yesterday. A recent Ricochet Question of the Day was why is Trump’s popularity rising? My mind was already reeling from days, weeks, months, even years of insane headlines, some on Ricochet. The story about the MIT entrance application asking to check one of 50-plus genders and list the perspective student’s sexual preferences, to a self-described anarcho-communist college professor spewing hate toward cops. Spinning in my mind were comments from Barbara Streisand and Cher to stop using my hairdryer and use only one piece of toilet paper … to save the environment. I might as well go in the yard and use a leaf.

Riots and protests from Boston to Berkeley, men now too manly, and sensitivity training commencing on campuses and throughout the military. Calling someone something other than their preferred surname can result in your job dismissal. So if your student, patient, or employee wants to be called Lobster Lewinsky, get it right or face consequences. Black-only proms and workdays – white privilege stay home. My head hurts from the nonsense. Van Jones crying on CNN because Trump only denounced White Supremacists three times instead of six, to Hollywood teeth gnashing and temper tantrums worthy of a diaper change, rappers rendered clothing – oh wait – that’s a fashion statement. I can’t stand it. Then yesterday it all became clear.

When the ongoing insanity in the sports world of overly paid players taking a knee during our National Anthem led to President Trump, in his subtle New York way, say wouldn’t it be great if just one coach, seeing his player take a knee during the National Anthem, in total disrespect to our flag and country say, “Get that S.O.B. off the field – you’re fired! Wouldn’t that be great?” It’s gotten so bad that third graders at one elementary school asked why their sports heroes were taking a knee during the anthem and if they could do it. Innocent children wanting to imitate their heroes. Nice.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

With a bunch of thanks to Mr. Brad Tupi from Pittsburgh, who said this in a letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal on August 19-20. The cause of the Left’s disease isn’t that it took identity politics too far-that is just one symptom. The root cause is that the left has abandoned […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Message Is the Tedium

 

My family and I went to see the new Wonder Woman movie over the weekend and enjoyed it, along with people all over the world. Yes, there is a feminist message inside the movie, which is to be expected when based on a comic book character designed from the very start to be a feminist icon. However, the message was pleasingly low-key and was balanced by the heroism of her male counterparts.

I must confess, after the insanity of creating a “safe space” for women to watch this movie without any men in the audience, I walked into the movie theater with some trepidation, expecting it to be Ms. Magazine with flashy CGI and a soundtrack. This did not happen, partly because director Patty Jenkins realized that a hero (or heroine, in this case) appears more heroic if what they do goes far beyond what even extraordinary humans can do. Fortunately, Steve Trevor (portrayed by Chris Pine) provides a male counterpart whose exploits could be compared (literally) to that of the gods. The female empowerment angle is still there, but it doesn’t get in the way of Wonder Woman being a darn good movie.

Let’s compare that to last summer’s feminist tent-pole movie, the remake of Ghostbusters, which featured an all-female cast. It was marketed from the very start as A Very Important Landmark in feminist cinematic history. And for months before it opened, it was talked up as a movie that will break through the glass ceiling and show the world that sisters are doin’ it for themselves.