Tag: law

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I just found the following post on American Thinker, and before I finished reading it, I thought, “I know some other people who might find this interesting!”.  The title is A Diatribe  Against Baseless Neutrality  and Blind Compromise , by AJ Castellitto.  It’s fairly long, but worth your time, I hope. Preview Open

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Here’s an article that illustrates one of the huge difference between conservatives/libertarians and liberals/progressives: It’s been the prettiest love story in recent Canadian political history — the romancing of the Assembly of First Nations by the Liberal government. But there are early signs that the relationship between the star-crossed lovers could be fraying. Preview Open

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Religions do things. Churches do things. Religious organizations do things. Things like preschools, grade schools, high schools, universities, law schools, nursing schools, med schools, hospitals, 12-step programs, eye clinics, dental clinics, day cares, famine relief, flood relief, affordable housing, pre-marital counseling, marriage counseling, divorce therapy, adoption agencies, racial reconciliation stuff, education in how to stay […]

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The Origins of Capitalism

 

Many years ago, I wrote my senior thesis on the origins of capitalism. I argued that capitalism can be defined as the ability to leverage one’s own assets, coupled with a legal system of equality under the law. This sounds easier than it is. In most of the world, throughout most of history, property has ultimately belonged to a lord, a king, or — most critically — to the future generations. If one is farming a piece of familial land, then the property is not actually owned by the farmer. He is, instead, a steward, connecting the past to the future. He cannot mortgage the property, because he cannot lose it. Capitalism requires the ability to lose one’s investment, and a society where the real estate is held as familial land cannot free up the capital required to achieve the enormous growth in wealth that capitalism enables.

Equality under the law is quite difficult as well. Almost every legal system has different rules for different people, and some kind of immunity for rulers. This kind of law, however, ultimately comes at a steep price for the populace. Only a fool invests in a new venture that the king can seize on a whim, so the most successful nations are the ones that put the law above any man. In order for capitalism to work, the system has to allow, at least theoretically, a poor man to sue the king for a property violation – and win.

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Donald Trump has not seduced me. I loathe him. After a decade of seeing the GOP play the long-game and building from the ground-up in state legislatures, governorships, the House and finally the Senate, watching a clown and his fans burn it all down at the finish line is beyond tragic. I have been #NeverTrump since […]

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  The lovely Miss Timpf, National Review’s answer to a question most conservatives have most certainly never asked, but could be tempted, if they’re young enough…, has a new post: A couple somewhere in America started a movement to persuade people not to have sex with Trump-supporters–moving all of less than an hundred people, so far so good. […]

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The Other Drug War

 

Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration rejected the application of Biomarin Pharmaceutical to market its drug Kyndrisa™ (drisapersen) for use in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The FDA, as is often the case when it rejects a drug application, listed all sorts of technical reasons why the data presented was not sufficient to establish by respectable scientific means that the drug in question was safe and effective in its intended use. Without question, much evidence from the clinical trials revealed serious complications from the drug’s use, including blood-platelet shortages that were potentially fatal, kidney damage, and severe injection-site reactions. But the no-treatment alternative could prove far worse.

Duchenne is a rare but fatal genetic disorder that attacks only young boys, roughly 1 in 3,500 to 5,000. Typically, it first manifests itself between two and five years of age. With time, it relentlessly weakens the skeletal muscles that control movement in the arms, legs, and trunk. Most of its victims are wheelchair-bound between the ages of seven and 13. By 20, many have died.

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Perhaps I’ve just seen too many movies, but I thought American legal tradition held that a spouse cannot be compelled to testify. A federal judge has just ruled otherwise.  I presumed that this protection was an extension of the legal right against self-incriminating testimony. Western legal codes, probably based on the Christian tradition of considering […]

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Freedom Through Natural Law

 

While one bishop (the pope) offered a sadly forgettable speech before Congress, another bishop hit one out of the park at the World Meeting of Families.

Though I believe Christians of all sorts would appreciate Bishop Robert Barron’s full speech, this bit about acquiring freedom through adherence to natural law should be accessible to non-Christian Ricochet members as well. This is what is meant by the famous claim, “the truth will set you free.”

Caesarism Comes to the Republican Party

 

donald_trump_paintingAmong a very long list of harms inflicted upon the United States by Barack Obama and his party, perhaps the worst was Caesarism. Obama relished the worship of millions in 2008. From his star turn at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, he was treated not as a political candidate, but as a savior. Progressives fell into a swoon, typified by Newsweek editor Evan Thomas’ 2008 comment, “I mean in a way Obama’s standing above the country, above — above the world; he’s sort of God.”

Now, a similar kind of unreasoning adulation is greeting (improbably enough) Donald Trump. Fred Barnes reports that a focus group of Trump supporters is swept up in a kind of worship, too: “He’s not just their favorite candidate. Their tie to him is almost mystical. He’s a kind of political savior, someone who says what they think.”

If Obama had accepted the reverence of the crowd but governed as a normal president, his sin would have been merely aesthetic. But he did not. Contempt for law and tradition has been the hallmark of his presidency. His lawlessness makes Richard Nixon’s look penny ante.

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I had planned to write a detailed piece covering the history of the Crow Indian Reservation in southwestern Montana. Something unexpected came up, so I have to put that off for a few days. But as a reasonable facsimile, I offer a hybrid photo essay about Custers Last Stand, the state of American Indian affairs, […]

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In traditional American ethics, a person is accountable even for accidents.  If you bump into someone while walking, you are expected to make a quick apology (“Sorry!” or perhaps “Excuse me!”). If you fail to meet a deadline or to attend a meeting due to circumstances beyond your control, you are expected to take responsibilty. […]

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Thursday’s news cycle blessed us with a prime illustration of a particularly tasty flavor of media bias: A left-leaning commentator spread misinformation without consequences, while, elsewhere, someone with an opposing view was being pilloried. The topic in question was the Redskins nickname, a subject about which I’ve written at length.  As most of you know, a […]

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There Goes the Neighborhood

 

When my brother and sister-in-law got married, they each owned a condo. Property prices were still terrible, so instead of selling the second one, they decided to rent it out. Last week, their tenants informed them that they would not renew the lease.

The problem is not the condo; it’s the neighbors. The unit next door was just bought by — not to put too fine a point on it — a thug. A big guy who doesn’t appear to have a steady job, plays loud music at all hours, and lets his three pit bulls run without a leash. He’s often seen smoking joints that look more like cigars. When politely asked to turn down the music or leash his dogs, he becomes aggressive and threatening. The tenants decided that the condo is a nice place, but it’s just easier to move than to deal with the neighbor.

Woman Arrested for Not Renewing $35 Dog License

 

RerhBeing a busy mom and surgical nurse, Becky Rehr of Kalamazoo County, Mich., kept forgetting to renew the license for her family’s 11-year-old springer/border collie mix. She finally turned in the paperwork on June 18 but a few days later received an arrest warrant from the local government. Not renewing a dog license is a criminal offense in this corner of southwestern Michigan.

While running errands with her 14-year-old daughter, Rehr swung by the sheriff’s office to show Johnny Law her $35 receipt and clear up the trivial matter. She was shocked when they took her mug shot, fingerprints, and tossed her into a holding cell at the county jail.

“They frisked me and put me in this intake cell with all these inmates in orange jumpsuits,” Rehr said. “I was pretty nervous.” It took three hours before CSI: Kalamazoo released her on a $100 bond so she could return to her daughter who had been waiting in the family car.

Crime and Injustice

 

danger-sex-offender-lives-nLet’s stipulate that a 19-year-old man who arranges a cross-state hook-up with a 17-year-old girl he just met online is not winning prizes for sound judgement. Let’s further agree that if the girl looks a little on the young side — she was just shy of fifteen, her statements to him to the contrary — and he still has sex with her, he’s set himself up for a load of trouble.

Even so, Zach Anderson seems to have been the victim of both extraordinary bad luck and an abusive legal system (H/T: Reason’s Lenore Skenazy). Despite his lack of criminal record, his complete cooperation with authorities, and qualification for a first-time offender status (similar to the one Shaneen Allen was initially denied in New Jersey), and a plea agreement, Anderson still found himself sentenced to to 90 days in county jail, after which his real sentence begins: an additional five years on probation during which he cannot live in a residence with an internet connection or a smart phone and 25 years on Michigan’s sex offender registry.

The case has some odd details. The matter only came to law enforcement’s attention because the girl in question left her medication at home before leaving for the tryst and her mother called the police worried that she might suffer a seizure while out (all this was completely unknown to Anderson). Next, the prosecution suggested that Anderson had a history of harassing and sexually manipulating girls online, which turned out to have been done by someone else. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the prosecutor reneged — at least, according to Anderson and his attorney — on his agreement to not argue against the optional reduced sentencing. Finally, the judge in question seems to either be a blowhard or to do a credible impersonation of one from the bench.