Tag: Kim Jong-un

Victor Davis Hanson describes how President Trump’s unconventional approach to foreign policy has often proved to be more effective than the conventional wisdom proffered by the Washington establishment.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for March 13, 2018, number 166! it’s the YoungUns edition of the show with your YoungUns hosts radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa. This week, heavens to murgatroyd he’s done it again! We discuss Donald Trump’s stunning decision to meet with Kim Jong Un of North Korea before May, following communication with South Korean diplomats who have suggested that Kim *might* be willing to surrender his nuclear weapons. It is obviously too early to tell if anything here will pan out, but the great uproar following the announcement is just what we have come to expect here in the age of Trump. Surprisingly, many of the mainstream media – including CNN – have greeted this announcement with something resembling approval…or at least hope. Just about everyone has had the common decency to wish Trump and the Administration well in his negotiations. The only vocal, unbending and completely unhinged responses that we have seen come from two of the usual suspects, namely Rachel Maddow and Jennifer Rubin. Maddow, of course, is paid to be a nutcase. Rubin is evidently paid in spite of it.

Then we will discuss the upcoming high school “walkout” protests this Wednesday (3/14). Todd is far more peeved by this than Mike is. The main question is whether the protests are being wholesale appropriated by the anti-NRA lobby or whether there is anti-NRA sentiment being folded into the protests but that they are subsidiary to a general desire to talk about the issues from all sides. This will obviously depend on where you are from. We will see.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America look at the possible pros and cons of President Trump meeting face-to-face with Kim Jong-Un, hoping there’s a shot at progress but realizing the North Koreans have no track record of honesty.  They also fume as radio chatter from the Florida high school shooting confirms Deputy Scot Peterson knew right away that shots were being fired inside the building, a direct contradiction of his earlier explanation that he did not enter the building because he thought the shots were coming from outside.  And they celebrate a robust jobs report, with over 300,000 new jobs added in February.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America very warily approach the reports of North Korea supposedly being willing to scrap its nuclear program in exchange for security guarantees.  While fully aware that Kim Jong-Un may only be looking to bait us or stall for time, they are hopeful that the tougher approach from the Trump administration is starting to pay off.  They also wince as Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri emerges in a new video urging jihadists to stop fighting with each other and focus on a common enemy.  And they react with bemusement and concern as former Trump campaign official Sam Nunberg appears on several cable news shows to announce he is defying the subpoena from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, only to later admit he will probably cooperate.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome the retirement of Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch and give him credit for the things he’s done well, and while they like Mitt Romney, they wonder if Utah is missing out on a younger and more conservative replacement for Hatch.  They also slam President Trump for his childish tweet about having a bigger nuclear button than Kim Jong-Un.  And they react to Steve Bannon unloading on his former White House rivals and accusing Donald Trump, Jr., Jared Kushner, and Paul Manafort of treason.

Update:  Since this recording, Trump has responded to Bannon.  “Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my Presidency.  When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind.”  Trump also accuses Bannon of leaking extensively during his time in office.

Recorded on September 26, 2017

After nearly a quarter of a century of the same approach—diplomacy, sanctions, and concessions—the United States seems out of policy options other than a military solution with regard to North Korea . Michael Auslin, Hoover’s inaugural Williams-Griffis Fellow in Contemporary Asia, discusses what scenarios may unfold on the Korean peninsula as well as the possibility of nuclear engagement and nuclear accidents.

Member Post

 

What options does the U.S. have to stop Kim Jong Un from obtaining a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile? Short of the U.S. holding its own Dennis Rodman hostage to bring North Korea’s ‘Little Despot’ (short and stout) to the bargaining table, President Donald Trump’s possible solutions go from horrible to horrifying. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see Kim Jong-Un has publicly back down from his threats to fire missiles towards Guam and discuss whether some new blunt talk from Defense Secretary James Mattis made the decision an easy one.  David rejects the push by the left and some on the right to move or remove Confederate memorials and statues and instead proposes more memorials to honor Union, slave, and free black figures from the war to provide more context.  And they roll their eyes as an ESPN commentator says he hopes a positive outcome from Charlottesville will be Colin Kaepernick getting a job in the NFL again.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Guam Gov. Eddie Calvo for pointing out that nuclear threats from North Korea are no big news for the tiny island, and that Americans there should go about their business as they would on any other day.  However, Jim and Greg still have some reservations about the idea of North Korea firing missiles designed to land just 20 miles off Guam’s shores.  And they throw up their hands in reaction to a new survey showing that more than half of Republicans would support postponing the 2020 elections if President Trump wanted to assure that only eligible voters took part.  They are exasperated both at the response and for pollsters asking a worthless hypothetical question in the first place.

Victor Davis Hanson looks at the the threat North Korea poses to the US and our Asian allies, explains how 30 years of bipartisan failures led us to this point, and describes the horrors that would accompany a war on the Korean Peninsula.

In this series of AEI Events Podcasts, AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt hosts experts and senior officials engaged in the development of human rights in North Korea to commemorate the third anniversary of the “Report of the Commission of Inquiry (COI) on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.” They propose an expert update on the human rights situation in North Korea and discuss how Washington and its allies in the region can seek to improve it.

This AEI Events Podcast features Justice Michael Kirby, former chief of the UN Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea, discussing international law with AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt. They discuss the mechanisms available under international law to hold the Kim regime accountable.

In this series of AEI Events Podcasts, AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt hosts experts and senior officials engaged in the development of human rights in North Korea to commemorate the third anniversary of the “Report of the Commission of Inquiry (COI) on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.” They provide an expert outlook on the human rights situation in North Korea and discuss how Washington and its allies in the region can seek to improve it. AEI’s President, Arthur C. Brooks, opens the event with introductory remarks. He offers a sobering reminder that the Kim family regime maintains the most dreadful gulag system in the world.

After introductions, a panel of experts engage in a discussion on the belligerence and denial of human rights in North Korea today. Panelists include Joanna Hosaniak (Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights), Robert King (former US special envoy on North Korean human rights), Go Myung-Hyun (Asan Institute for Policy Studies), and Greg Scarlatoiu (Committee for Human Rights in North Korea). The discussion is moderated by Jung-Hoon Lee (the Republic of Korea ambassador for North Korean human rights).

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for August 1, 2017 it’s the Summer’s Almost Ov…. oops, I mean it’s the Scaramucci Does the Fandango edition of the podcast with your hosts Todd Feinburg and Mike Stopa.

Our topics today range from absurdity to armageddon, from Springtime for Kelly to Nuclear Winter for Kim.

Victor Davis Hanson examines the major foreign policy challenges facing the Trump Administration, including how to properly calibrate the US relationship with Russia, how to defang a nuclear North Korea, and how to combat terrorism as ISIS shifts to a new era.

Victor Davis Hanson describes the Trump Administration’s challenges with Russia, North Korea, and China. He also weighs in on the recent debate between Rex Tillerson and John McCain over the proper balance between advancing America’s national security interests and advocating for human rights abroad.

Member Post

 

Do you have time to check out another podcast? Feel free to listen in as I touch on different issues of the day and hopefully help to think through the issues. Then, check out the latest episode of Thinking It Through with Jerome Danner. It is on iTunes, Stitcher, and Soundcloud as well. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

 Speaker of the House, House of Representative, United States Congress  Dear Santa Claus—How is Mrs. Claus? Rudolf? All is well I hope. Thanks for the awesome All Oatmeal Diet cookbook last year, but you know what I want this year? Bear Archery Bruzer Crossbow Package with Scope. Thank you, Paul Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.