Tag: kids

I Get It Now, Dad

 

June 2011– Now that I have my own kids, some of the stuff that made no sense to me when I was growing up has become clear. I fully grasp why certain behaviors evoked a response from my dad. He and I might have different approaches in dealing with similar kid situations: my dad would have been quick and efficient, no fanciness or equivocation. Nevertheless, it makes sense now.

For example, when I was a kid, I liked to read more than I liked to do almost anything else. Reading ranked a close second with playing outside. For sure it ranked high above “work” or “chores” or “listening to Dad explain something maybe related to chores.” Occasionally when I was engrossed in a story, my dad would emerge from his office and decide that something needed explaining. I would get up from where I had been lying on the couch, fix my eyes on him, and let the book dangle at my side, careful to have my finger at the right page. Then suddenly, inexplicably, in the middle of what he was saying, my dad would grab the book, send it sailing across the room, and say, “You need to get your nose out of that book.” I’d be flabbergasted. Why, my nose wasn’t in the book. Hadn’t it, along with my eyes, been pointed at him? Hadn’t I been nodding in all the right places?

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome growing evidence that coronavirus transmission rates are very low in the schools. Jim explains why the Trump campaign’s accusations of massive election fraud don’t seem to hold water. And they shake their heads as Barack Obama reveals why his Middle East peace efforts went nowhere.

Member Post

 

The vile, electrical current that is engulfing our beloved country, with its short-circuiting sparks of pandemics, riots, political turmoil and people-bashing on social media, as well as city streets, I find myself longing to pull the plug for some semblance of peace; the kind found in simple pursuits, minus electronic devices. The fishing theme makes […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Join Charlotte as she discusses how we can all help non-profits that are helping people who have been hurt by the coronavirus.

Learn all about how Memorial Day started and why it’s so important to celebrate those who have given their lives defending our freedom.

Join Charlotte as she talks all about non profits and why they’re so important right now!

Send us your questions and good news to: littlesnewsbriefing@gmail.com

Check out the video on my Youtube Channel!

Join me as I make a mask at home out of one of my t-shirts!

Join Charlotte as she explains what the CDC is and why we are wearing masks right now. We also review our Weekly Challenge results! Next time on the show, watch as she makes a mask at home!

Send us your questions at littlesnewsbriefing@gmail.com

Join Charlotte on today’s episode where she explains why small businesses are so important in our country. We also learn some new words like “start-up” and “entrepreneurs.”

On this episode, Charlotte interviews an art therapist about the best ways to keep our mind and body healthy!

Visit arttherapy.org for more information on art therapy and how to find an art therapist near you!

Join Charlotte as she answers a listener’s question, “What is an executive order?” She talks all about the government and history of the constitution!

This week, Charlotte explains to kids how testing for the coronavirus will work! She also answers questions from kids all over America!

Join Charlotte as she interviews her mom, Second Lady Karen Pence, about her new task force called “More than Ever Before.” She helps us think of ways to keep our minds healthy during this time and reminds us that “it’s okay to not be okay.”

States around the country are starting to re-open their businesses. What does all of this mean? Join Charlotte as she explains Phase One of the White House Coronavirus Task Force’s re-opening plan to kids! She also talks about the news of the week and answers questions from kids all over America!

On this episode, Charlotte explains to kids why the economy is important and how the government plans to re-open the country. She also answers questions from kids all over America!

Strange sighting in Northern Virginia

 

Today, as usual – I was walking our dog down the local road and was shocked to see two of our neighbor kids playing in their back yard; they are probably about seven and ten years old. They are our closest neighbor in one direction – about 1/4 mile, but we have much closer neighbors who have children who have grown up in the 18 years they have been here. It is extremely rare to see them in their yard (about 4 acres) and we have never seen them anywhere else. There are several other houses within a half-mile and the situation is the same.

Now, let me explain. We live in far north Northern Virginia. Our lot has about an acre of woods, across the street is probably 10 acres of woods with a creek and a swamp and a pond. About 1/4 mile to the west is “Short Hill Mountain” (emphasis on short, but it is steep) which is all wooded.

One and Only, or Shop Around?

 

There are two philosophies of dating and finding a partner.

There is the idea that some people can find their person at the get-go. This means that dating further is without purpose and sticking with it, learning how to be in a relationship, and making a commitment is paramount. There is the other idea that one never knows unless one has experience of the world. Why settle down when you can sample the finer things in life? Why settle down when you can check around and maybe find something better? How do you know that you want what you’ve got unless you see what else is out there? By see, of course I mean experience.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud columnist Ruth Margolis for blasting liberals who demand that parents must immerse kids of all ages in politics and the social justice movement. They also wince at the evidence Republicans may have lost congressional seats in states like California and New Jersey because they limited how much residents could use their state and local tax bill to reduce their federal tax payments. And they react to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell urging Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey to appoint defeated Senate candidate Martha McSally to the state’s other Senate seat if Jon Kyl steps down before 2020.

On Raising Willful Children

 

I am a bit stubborn, when I want to be. Just a bit. Like the way water is a bit wet or the sun is a bit hot.

My wife is a bit stubborn too, when she decides to be. And now we have kids. Twin girls.

To Rid the World of Snowflakes We Must Stop Coddling Our Kids

 

Note: I’ve had this in the hopper for a few weeks, but after Bethany Mandel published My Top Parenting Pet Peeve, I figured why not hit publish?

Despite the social discord wrought by the Vietnam War, civil rights movement (an obvious good), and the loud-mouthed hippies who traveled the world seeking the ruin of standards of decency; the 1960s were a pretty good time to be a kid. In those days; which weren’t idyllic, but were halcyon compared to the present age of discontent, children had many venues in which to learn. There was a fair amount of competition among the schools; particularly parochial versus public, which motivated all teachers to perform well. The nuns of Holy Rosary School, where I came of age, taught both the three Rs, and truths of eternal importance: Our lives are not our own but belong to God. We were to know, love and serve Him this life by doing good and avoiding evil, and thereby live with Him forever in heaven. It’s been fifty years since my last catechism class, but that lesson is permanently fixed in my mind.