Tag: Ketanji Brown Jackson

Baby Biologist?

 

I’ve been watching episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents from its run in the late 1950s.  Most, of course, take liberties with credibility but one episode stretches things further than modern-day minds can take. I decided to watch this episode, “Silent Witness”, because the director’s daughter, Pat, makes an appearance.

Here’s the IMDb summation of the episode: “Donald Mason is a married professor who wants to end a romance with one of his students. He stops by while she is babysitting. He tries to end the relationship, but she threatens to expose him. He kills her and leaves a witness: the screaming baby she was watching. Later, Mason runs into the infant in a carriage on the street. At the sight of him, the baby screams and cries.”

In subsequent encounters with the baby, the baby grows agitated and upset. Mason is convinced that the baby recognizes him as the murderer and that once the baby learns to talk, it will testify against him. So Mason turns himself over to the police. 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” as the nation prepares for the likely confirmation of its first Black female U.S. Supreme Court justice, Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. G. Edward White, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, and author of the three-volume book, Law in American History. Professor White draws on his experiences clerking for Chief Justice Earl Warren to share information about Warren’s character, and how his landmark Brown v. Board of Education opinion has shaped America’s legal culture and access to education in our era. They explore Professor White’s legal history trilogy, and talk about what teachers and students today should know about the Civil War and ending slavery, from the Dred Scott decision of 1857 through the Thirteenth Amendment. They delve into the second volume, from Reconstruction, industrialization, and immigration, to the rise of Jim Crow; and the third volume on massive legal changes since World War II. The interview concludes with a reading by Professor White from his trilogy.

Stories of the WeekU.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona is fielding criticism from the left on loan forgiveness, and the right on mask mandates and hot-button curriculum issues. The Washington Post editorial board calls out the Biden administration for proposed new federal rules that will likely hamper charter schools’ growth.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with constitutional scholar Ilya Shapiro about Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination hearings and what her background and responses reveal about her views on the Constitution, the role of the Supreme Court, and her likely judicial positions relative to her fellow justices.

Guest:

Member Post

 

When 83-year old Supreme Court Justice Steven Breyer announced his retirement in February, it neither surprised nor initially concerned me. Hard-charging leftists demanded Breyer’s resignation ever since their legal and cinematic icon, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, passed away in 2020, leaving President Trump an opportunity to nominate and the Senate to confirm Amy Coney Barrett in quick order, […]

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What Is a Women’s History Month?

 

Since 1987, America has recognized March as Women’s History Month. In this year’s proclamation, President Biden wrote that the event “provides an opportunity to honor the generations of trailblazing women and girls who have built our Nation, shaped our progress, and strengthened our character as a people.”

Truly a noble effort. But in 2022, nothing can be so simple. We can’t even agree what a “woman” is, let alone “history” or “month.”

The latest example occurred during the hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R–Tenn.) asked the nominee, “Can you provide a definition for the word ‘woman?'”

Did Republicans Treat Jackson Worse Than Democrats Treated Kavanaugh?

 

In the opinion of the Washington Post editorial board, yes.  It’s paywalled, but here’s the highlights.

A woman credibly accused Mr. Kavanaugh of sexual assault. Democrats rightly asked the committee to investigate. After a superficial FBI review, Republicans pressed forward his nomination. In the end, it was Mr. Kavanaugh who behaved intemperately, personally attacking Democratic senators and revealing partisan instincts that raised questions about his commitment to impartiality.