Tag: justice

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Justice for Warriors

 

The military used to be one of the most highly respected organizations of our federal government. Over time, however, it has suffered from the criticism of a Progressive society. Barack Obama made some of the most drastic changes to the military and in so doing exacerbated the negative perceptions of society toward the military:

A curious thing happened in the second half of the Obama era: The commander-in-chief began viewing the military less as an entity designed to destroy enemies but a tool with which to achieve progressive goals. Warriors were turned into social-justice warriors. Men and women with risible-to-nonexistent military records were made heads of the services. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus (who had logged all of two years’ service as a junior officer) named ships after Cesar Chavez and Harvey Milk.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: One Standard

 

“The truth is most conservatives are fine accepting apologies for dumb stuff said or done years ago. Unfortunately, liberals refuse to forgive conservatives so we have no choice but to do the same to you. It doesn’t have to be this way. We only ask for one standard.” – Chris Barron (2019-09-18)

It’s not from an extremely famous figure (he is a Fox Business contributor). It’s not an extremely pithy one-liner. In that tweet, however, you have the summary for so much of the current situation in the GOP.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Oberlin College Hit With Maximum Punitive Damages

 

The civil judgement against Oberlin College for its SJW mau-mauing of Gibson’s Bakery just tripled from $11 million to $33 million. Thursday, the jury assessed the maximum punitive damages of $22 million against the school. Legal Insurrection has been all over this:

Daniel McGraw, our reporter in the courtroom, reports that in addition to the $11.2 million compensatory damages awarded last Friday, the jury awarded a total of $33 million in punitive damages, which will probably be reduced by the court to $22 million because of the state law cap at twice compensatory (it’s not an absolute cap, but probably will apply here). That brings the total damages to $33 million. We will have the breakdown soon. The jury also awarded attorney’s fees, to be determined by the judge.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why Andrew Weissmann Is So Despised

 

The list is long for all the people who have been criticized and condemned by the Right for their participation in the Trump-Russia fiasco. Many on the list pretend to be public servants but, unfortunately, they are political hacks who have shown they are willing to do just about anything to get rid of Donald Trump. But from my perspective, one man has been mentioned only in passing, and he deserves to be in the glaring spotlight of justice. His many years of unethical behavior and manipulation need to be not just called out; there must be a way to hold him to account.

His name is Andrew Weissmann.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Federal Conviction System

 

Over the years, Ricochet’s members who practice law have occasionally mollified our common predilection for lawyer jokes by providing examples of honest-to-goodness Justice in action. At the local levels, at least, American judicial systems seem to work now and then; even if other first-hand experiences among Ricochetti have been downright depressing.

Would anyone care to defend the federal criminal justice system? Mark Steyn has written many times that US courts at the national level boast a conviction rate that would impress brutal third-world dictators.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Law Talk: A Comment on March 27 Episode

 

“Stunned” is the best word to describe my reaction to Richard Epstein’s stated opinion that all should be forgiven with those Federal employees who abused their power in the FISA/Russian collusion drama for fear of the downside to such a pursuit of justice.

This scandal has roiled our country and had significant financial and emotional costs for the targets involved — not to mention the negative impact on foreign policy over the past two years, of which I am painfully aware, living abroad. But what the heck, let’s mention it. Can you imagine the damage done to our negotiating position with enemies and allies alike who were told by lovelies like former Secretary of State John Kerry just to wait it out, the pesky Trump would be gone soon? Try.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Texas Shows What Real Prosecution of “Hate” Crime Looks Like: Death Penalty

 

This is what real “hate crimes” legislation and prosecution looks like: “A second man convicted in the 1998 dragging death of James Byrd Jr. is set to be executed this week.” A second man convicted of dragging a black man to death is set to be executed by Texas this week. This monster would be spending the rest of his life, maybe, as a ward of the state in California, or Washington State, or New York, or fill in your Democrat-controlled state here.

But see what CNN and the left prioritizes:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Chicago Justice

 

There is no such thing as justice — in or out of court.” — Clarence Darrow interview in Chicago (April 1936)

You may have heard similar versions of this quote from numerous people who feel that they have been wronged by the law. However, consider the source of this quote. Clarence Darrow is a famous (infamous?) progressive lawyer, noted for defending controversial defendants and participating in the Scopes trial. Yet here, he is declaring that justice does not exist. What exactly was his goal as a lawyer, then?

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hate Violence is a Hoax

 

The title of this brief post is clearly clickbait, obviously horrible crimes have been perpetrated due to hateful motivations, but the whole idea of “hate violence” itself is philosophically troubling.

Actress Ellen Page recently wrote a piece responding to the Jussie Smollet fiasco that included these words:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Consent of the Governed

 

Once again I’m looking at the Declaration. In the PowerPoint version of the Declaration, this would be one of the bullet points on the “We hold these truths to be self-evident” slide:

That to secure these rights Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Kavanaugh Is Up to the Challenge

 

“Justice Thomas, who also faced false last-minute allegations during his nominating process, has spent more than a quarter-century on the court doing his job, staying true to his judicial principles, and not giving a damn what the Washington Post and CNN have to say about him. It’s unfortunate that the newest justice faces a similar task, but I’m guessing he’s up to it.” — Jason Riley, Wall Street Journal

The Left will continue to harangue us about Justice Kavanaugh and attack the man, but ultimately I believe he will be admired for his resilience under fire, for his passion for defending his reputation, for his defense of his family, and his stellar record. In the tradition of every Supreme Court, I hope he will be treated with respect and grace by his colleagues. I’m counting on their rising above all the chaos and welcoming him into the fold.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Musings of a Third-Generation Wagon Circler

 

Writing here at Ricochet last week, @KateBraestrup expressed her opinion that “even without the sixfold imprimatur of the FBI, it would be virtually impossible to make a circle of wagons tight enough to conceal the kind of lurid behavior that Kavanaugh has been accused of.” She continued: “It’s not that it doesn’t exist; rather, when it exists, people know about it. Louche, lascivious or predatory men (alcoholic or otherwise) over time become well-known for being so.” While I’m relieved Kavanaugh has been confirmed, and I dreaded the precedent that would have been set if he had not have been, I can’t agree that men’s wagon circles are virtually never this tight. I know because I’m part of more than one man’s wagon circle, as was my mother, and her mother before her. Three generations of conservative American women, all three with little inclination to laugh off predatory behavior as just “boys being boys” — and all three with just as little inclination to name and shame men for having stories like those alleged about Kavanaugh in their past.

Men become notorious for sexual predation by persisting in it for long periods of time, especially if they become shameless about it. One reason we caution youth to postpone sex is because immature sexual misadventures are often exploitative. As Mark Regnerus has documented in his books Premarital Sex in America: How Young Americans Meet, Mate, and Think about Marrying and Forbidden Fruit: Sex & Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers, boys usually find it considerably easier than girls do to self-servingly and callously rationalize their “conquests,” even when they’ve had the moral formation to know better. Thank God that boys who should know better and don’t often mature into men who know better and do! Thank God that not everyone who has committed a sexual wrong in his past persists in that sort of misbehavior.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s About Time

 

Major Garrett shifted uneasily in his chair, as the cameras and lights were set up around him. He reflected on his nearly twenty years with the media, especially on his decision to move from Fox News to CBS in 2012. Recently he had wondered if he had made the right decision, given the attitude and behavior of the media toward President Trump and his administration. Today he might be risking his career, but he believed it was the right thing to do.

At that moment the door to the hotel room opened and former President Obama strode into the room, smiling as he saw Garrett waiting for him. Garrett stood up and extended his hand to shake the President’s hand, then invited him to sit down.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

“I’ll tell you another story” says Alexi. “It begins with a dwarf coming out of the mountains to trade with the City of Man.” ‘What do you mean it’s just as good as gold?’ asked the dwarf. His eyes squinted out from under bushy eyebrows. His old and lanky ox shuffled idly under it’s burdens. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Evil Has No Expiration Date

 

The deportation of Jakiw Palij has once more raised the specter of the Nazi holocaust and whether or not those who were guards at the concentration camps should be pursued and prosecuted.

Some people are saying that Palij is 95 years old and has led a quiet life in Jackson Heights, NY and should be left alone. Most people didn’t even know about his association with the camps until it became public after the U.S. revoked his citizenship in 2003. A judge ordered his expulsion in 2005, but the German authorities didn’t want to prosecute him since his crimes took place on foreign soil; the Poles claimed he was Germany’s responsibility. Finally, our current German ambassador, Richard Grenell, persuaded the Germans to accept him, and he has finally been deported. No one has reported whether deporting him to another country was ever considered.

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Member Post

 

There is something going on among the Catholic faithful that, from a worldly perspective, seems exceedingly odd given the wide-ranging lay response to the recent Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report on child sexual abuse and the cover-up by the Church hierarchy. The Catholic laity is appalled, furious, and unyielding in demanding that each and every bishop […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Taking Stock and Surviving the Miasma

 

The political atmosphere has become suffocating; sometimes it’s a good idea to come up for air, to try to gain perspective and to reflect on whether we are headed in a productive direction or about to fall off a cliff.

Trying to make sense of the times is nearly impossible. How does one make sense of life in the middle of chaos? The rancor has been intensified by obstinacy, the outrage colored by disbelief. All the stories point in the direction of violence and an ongoing desire for retribution. The irony of these descriptions is that they point to both sides of the political equation. The Left and Right, for different reasons, are contributing to the disruption: I believe that one side is poisoning politics and governance; the other is trying to stop that movement and transcend it.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

First I took @rodin‘s advice to approach the day as an investigative reporter. That mindset helped me start the day in a more settled state of mind: curious and open. When we arrived at the court house, witnesses had arrived. We waved at them and mouthed, thank you, as we entered the court room. More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Elementary Justice? Or Not?

 

“Well, I am afraid I can’t help you, Lestrade,” said Holmes. “The fact is that I knew this fellow Milverton, that I considered him one of the most dangerous men in London, and that I think there are certain crimes which the law cannot touch, and which therefore, to some extent, justify private revenge. No, it’s no use arguing. I have made up my mind. My sympathies are with the criminals rather than with the victim, and I will not handle this case.” — The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton

Like many another successful author, this one was ambivalent about his relationship with his greatest creation. He found Holmes distracting and annoying, and frequently talked of “slaying” him and “winding him up for good and all.” (His one attempt to do so was, obviously not all that successful. It appeared that publishers would pay any amount for more of the great detective, and the fellow with a difficult, not very well-off life, who hadn’t succeeded at almost anything else he tried, was yoked to Sherlock Holmes for the remainder of his.)

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