Tag: Justice Scalia

Sailing the Magnanimous Sea

 

At night, Holland America’s Nieuw Amsterdam’s showroom hosts illusionists, concerto pianists, song and dance acts, and run-of-the-mill cruise entertainment. But it was during the day the real stage action occurred as the “O.N.T.P.’s of the Caribbean” (Original NeverTrump Pirates) sat on panels discussing what historically may have been the craziest election cycle of our lifetimes. The Weekly Standard’s post-election cruise included an impressive collection of conservative writers, editors, pundits, politicos, and a few non-Weekly Standard surprises.

Water Polo and the Judge

 

131007_DX_ScaliaIsMean.jpg.CROP.promo-mediumlargeThe whistles from both sides of the Olympic pool blew hard. The white clad referees each pointed to the defender in front of my son and held up the four fingers representing his number, and then pointed to the side. The player was done. Kicked out. The blood oozing from my sons nose was finally enough proof the other kid used his elbow too many times.

Not wanting to mollycoddle, but suitably concerned, I remained standing in my position, clapping and cheering him on as the teams went back to their respective corners. The coach checked on my son. This wasn’t just any game; they were deep into a qualifying tournament, just a feat to be there at all, which if they medaled would provide an invite to the Junior Olympics.

For the past few minutes the phone was furiously buzzing in my back pocket. It was Saturday afternoon. No business today, I thought, and left alone whatever was going on in the outside world.

Member Post

 

I have a few observations on the impact of the death of Justice Scalia. I welcome your comments on them. I am saddened that I was correct in predicting that the Left would engage in a vengeful grave dancing orgy over Justice Scalia’s death. Whether they realize it or not, their reaction is a stain […]

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Member Post

 

Judi and I are deeply saddened this afternoon upon learning of the death of this truly great man, who touched our lives, albeit briefly, as he touched so many lives all across the Nation, and the country has lost one of the great legal historians and scholars and bed rock adherents to the Doctrine of […]

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Mismatch Theory: Why a Movie Should Be Made about Prof. Richard Sander (Part 3)

 

This post is the third in a series on Prof. Richard Sander and the reaction to his Mismatch theory. You can read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 4 of this series at the links.

51ba5ZH-x8L._SX308_BO1,204,203,200_As I noted in Part 2 of this series, a slew of pro-affirmative-action law scholars wrote critiques of Sander’s work on Mismatch, the theory that if students are less prepared for a particular level of instruction—which occurs almost by design with affirmative action—then, not only do they make worse grades than their peers, they actually learn less than they would have learned if they had attended a less challenging school. All of these critiques, I believe, realized that the first and second regularities that Sander documented were solid. None even attempted to show contradictory data that could overturn them.

Mismatch Theory: Why a Movie Should Be Made about Prof. Richard Sander (Part 2)

 

This post is the second in a series on Prof. Richard Sander and the reaction to his Mismatch theory. You can read Part 1, Part 3, and Part 4 of this series at the links.

51ba5ZH-x8L._SX308_BO1,204,203,200_As I noted in Part 1, Sander noticed an overlap with what economist Thomas Sowell called the “mismatch” effect. If students are less prepared for a particular level of instruction—which occurs almost by design with affirmative action—then, not only do they make worse grades than their peers, they actually learn less than they would have learned if they had attended a less challenging school.