Tag: Juneteenth

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I hope everybody enjoys their up coming 4th of July / Independence Day holiday.  We will most likely have only a few more like these.  Congress has recently created / raised a little-known regional holiday to national federal status.  This new holiday is designed to celebrate and focus our nation of all critical race issues […]

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GENERAL ORDER NUMBER 3 General Order, No. 3 The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them, […]

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RepubliCAN’T Willful Failure: Juneteenth Holiday

 

Juneteenth started as an informal Texas holiday.* Last year, at the height of street violence in the name of racial justice for Blacks, the Republican-controlled Senate could not be bothered to push through federal legislation, sponsored by the senior senator from Texas, John Cornyn. This was the sort of legislation that President Trump loved to sign, and would have played right into the heart of his political strategy to make every ethnic and racial group electorally competitive, not the taken-for-granted electoral “property” of Democrats or Republicans. Now Chuck Schumer showed exactly what Mitch McConnell could have done, but chose not to do, out of contempt for Black Americans, or cluelessness, or a burning desire to tank the 2020 election.

Senator Chuck Schumer, acting like a real Senate Majority Leader, put forward a motion for unanimous consent on Senator Cornyn’s legislation making Juneteenth a federal holiday. This led to immediate passage after RepubliCAN’T Ron Johnson finally abandoned his “principled” opposition, used by McConnell last year to tank the bill put forward by Republican Senator Cornyn before Juneteenth. Ron Johnson’s laughable objection was the supposed $400 million dollar “cost” of one less workday, converted into a paid federal holiday. Johnson even tried killing the Republican bill last year by proposing an amendment eliminating Columbus Day in the trade-off. In an era of multi-trillion spending bills and annual budgets, $400 million is a rounding error. It is a joke, an insincere objection.

Last year, President Trump followed the long tradition of issuing a Presidential Message for Juneteenth from the White House [emphasis added]:

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I’m seeing posts from people who are stating that they suddenly get today off. It took effect immediately? I’m surprised. Also, I am pleased to see a Federal Holiday finally commemorating the liberation of Black Republicans by other Republicans (Black and White) from the cruelty of slavery imposed on them by White Democrats. Sort of […]

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Fox News’ most-watched program host, Tucker Carlson, took after two US Senators for advocating the abolition of Columbus Day in favor of Juneteenth – or more accurate, June 19th, 1865, when the last slaves in Texas were informed that they were free – the end of slavery, as it were, at least confederate slavery (it […]

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I’ve always had a soft spot for old school spirituals.  Simple, straight-forward, honest with no pretenses.  I occasional attend a Lutheran church that interweaves old German hymns with spirituals, partly because of their mixed congregation.  Musically, they laid some of the foundations for jazz and blues, which I also like, and obviously led into gospel […]

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It hasn’t happened yet, but look for this headline to appear in newspapers across the country.  Anyone want to hazard a guess when it will happen?  Mine is 6/19/21. However, the push to make this change will begin before the November election so as to get politicians’ opinions on the record.  Watch for a unanimous […]

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Juneteenth at 155 years

 

This is the 155th anniversary of the day slaves in Texas received the news that they were free. On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger read General Orders, Number 3, to the people of Galveston. It read in part:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

Ricochet has taken note of this important historical event and its commemoration for at least the past three years:

Juneteenth: Emancipation Day

 

On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger read General Orders, Number 3, to the people of Galveston, Texas. It was two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation, but at last the words of freedom came to African-American slaves in Texas. This day became known as Juneteenth, and eventually became first an unofficial holiday and then a holiday recognized by some states.

General Granger wrote, in part:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.