Tag: judicial nominations

James R. Copland joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss President Trump’s impact on the federal courts, the appointment of Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, and the diversity in conservative judicial philosophy emerging today.

The director of legal policy at the Manhattan Institute, where he is a senior fellow, James Copland has written and spoken widely on how to improve America’s civil- and criminal-justice systems. “Toward a Less Dangerous Judicial Branch,” his article (coauthored with Rafael A. Mangual) assessing Trump’s court appointments, appears in the Winter 2019 issue of City Journal.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for squashing the “blue slip” system and expediting the confirmation of judicial appointments. Even though they’re pretty sure President Trump is joking about pulling network licenses in response to “fake news,” they explain why a president should never be threatening the existence of a media outlet over their content. And they cheer Ronan Farrow for his impressive reporting on the extent of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual assaults and harassment, while also blasting NBC for its lame explanation for refusing to run the story months ago.

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Six months into the Trump presidency the GOP Congress struggles with the promise of swift and dramatic reforms. Kevin Kosar, the R Street Institute’s vice president of policy and a ten-year veteran of Capitol Hill, discusses how the legislative branch became the weakest of government’s limbs.

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One hundred and fifty days into his presidency, Donald Trump is on pace to issue the most executive orders for a first-year president since Harry Truman in 1945. Hoover research fellow Adam White reviews the highs and lows of Trump’s signing flurry–and discusses the need for the Trump White House to pick up the pace for executive and judicial appointments.

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