Tag: Journalism

Today’s guest, Chris Pandolfo, covers politics from beyond the Beltway, and Jack asks him what it’s like to observe Beltway bedlam from afar.

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Shame on the cowards, the ingrates who backed down instead of speaking truth to power. Shame on them for then rolling out half-truths in damage control. The left corrupts everything. We learned from multiple sources of the latest “Orange Man Bad” episode in the world of philanthropy. The James W. Foley Legacy Foundation is relatively […]

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It’s a good question, isn’t it? To answer it, Jack invites actual young person journalist Philip Wegmann, now a political reporter for Real Clear News, to attempt to justify himself. They also discuss whether young people are consuming news correctly, and give advice for young people aspiring to be journalists and to be just generally informed citizens.

The President Is Toast

 

From The New York Times, a devastating critique of where the President’s re-election chances stand now that the Democrats are more emboldened in Congress:

At midterm, the once-dazzling political momentum… has stalled. In the year ahead, the President faces what his allies and advisers see as the most critical tests of his Presidency both at home and abroad.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announcing there will be a vote on the criminal justice reform bill known as the FIRST STEP Act. They also discuss Time magazine’s selection of Jamal Khashoggi and other murdered and persecuted journalists as the “Person of the Year” and take time to explain that no one can equate President Trump’s treatment of the media to the murders and imprisonment for the press in other parts of the world. And they assess MSNBC hosts Stephanie Ruhle and Ali Velshi being appalled that each person supposedly being considered by Trump to be the next chief of staff is a white male.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer a robust October jobs report, which shows 250,000 new jobs last month, rising wages, and job growth in every sector. They also wince as Ainsley Earhardt of “Fox and Friends” says all President Trump wants from the press is to “be accurate and report the story the way that I want it reported.” They also chronicle the pathetic flailing of North Dakota Democrats, who are now telling hunters they could lose their hunting licenses in other states if they vote in North Dakota. And they take a moment to discuss the Green Party U.S. Senate candidate dropping out in Arizona, and Jim says the party is losing it’s greatest marketing ploy of all time.

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Today, ABC News investigative reporter Brian Ross announced that he and his long time producer, Rhonda Schwartz, were leaving the network. The 69-year-old Ross had been with ABC for 24 years. Prior to that, he had worked at NBC News for the better part of two decades. His decision to leave ABC comes six months […]

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The Beginning and the End of History

 

One of the most cogent observations that Rush Limbaugh ever made is the axiom that “most people believe history began the day they were born.” As a nation, we have become more and more historically illiterate. The native-born voters that will be eligible to go to the polls for the first time ever this fall will be the first born in the 2000s and the 2020 election will see the ascension of the 21st-century voter. These people will vote with little understanding of their country’s history beyond the idea that it was racist, misogynistic and a backwater of religious nuttery.

With George W. Bush having left office when they were 8- to 10-years old, they will have little practical first-hand knowledge of any president other than Mssrs. Obama and Trump. They will never personally know a combatant of the two World Wars. For them, real fascism will be what the radical left tells them it is. They will never know anyone, as I did in my youth, with an inventory number tattooed on their forearm, a “souvenir” of days in one of Hitler’s death camps.

A Discussion About Media Bias with NY Times’ Tina Rosenberg, Co-founder of Solutions Journalism

 

Tina RosenbergTina Rosenberg is the co-founder of Solutions Journalism, which collaborates with 170 news organizations and 10 journalism schools to change the culture of news. We discuss combatting activist journalism, media bias, hypocrisy, the future of journalism, what’s missing in today’s news, and how journalists can allow for a more civil and enlightening conversation.

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Steven Crowder comedian/ entertainer/ political commentator/ had his producer infiltrate Antifa, which was to be part of a segment of his show. Crowder does these types of things from time to time, as a goof but also to expose SJW’s and how ridiculous they are. He crashed a feminist film festival, which I thought was […]

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The Art of Civil Discourse – and Treason

 
Teddy Fischer of Mercer Island High School near Seattle (Photo: KING 5/Tegna)

Back in May, the Washington Post published a picture of Keith Schiller, President Trump’s pre-Secret Service body guard with a Post-It note stuck on a stack of papers. Clear as day on that little slip of paper was Defense Secretary James Mattis’ cell phone number. The Post pulled the picture when notified but not before quite a few people called and filled up the SecDef’s voice mail.

3 Journalists Leave CNN for Publishing Unverified Trump/Russia Hit Piece

 

The DC press corps, desperate to sink Trump, post a new story about Russian election meddling daily. Most of these stories share the common threads of unnamed sources, assumption of bad faith, and wild conjecture. A particularly odious example was a CNN piece published late last week claiming that Senate investigators were looking into Trump backer Anthony Scaramucci’s connections to a Russian investment fund. The allegation was made on the word of a single unnamed source.

Friday night the story vanished from CNN’s website, and some hours later, was replaced with a formal retraction notice and an apology to Scaramucci. After a busy weekend, all three journalists involved with the piece have resigned from the network: Thomas Frank, who wrote the story; Eric Lichtblau, an editor in the unit; and Lex Haris, who oversaw the unit.

The departures of Haris, Lichtblau and Frank are likely to come as a surprise to colleagues, particularly given the reputations of the three men.

America’s Entrenched Media Malpractice

 

Perhaps the most accurate depiction of American media’s fanatical opposition to President Trump is a Glenn McCoy cartoon, which slaps viewers in the face by showing a maniacal inmate wrapped in a straitjacket inside a padded cell. The word “Media” is embossed on his chest, and dozens of “Trump” inscriptions are plastered across the floor and the walls, at goofy angles and in uneven letters. “He’s crazy!” the wretch screeches, referring to Trump.

Recently, the Shorenstein Center at Harvard University issued a report on President Trump’s first 100 days that confirmed Glenn McCoy’s message. The Center’s Thomas Patterson stated, “…the sheer level of negative coverage gives weight to Trump’s contention, one shared by his core constituency, that the media are hell bent on destroying his presidency. As he tweeted a month after taking office, ‘The FAKE NEWS media… is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American People!’”

Which, of course, depends on one’s opinion of American media, but certainly the Shorenstein Center’s review inspires exploration of reporting patterns that put accusations of media bias and, more recently, “fake news” into context. The following comments are presented as an attempt to clarify what’s been going on from about the 1960s, but which has intensified since the second Bush administration. In short, how best can one categorize American news reporting? Here are a few suggestions.

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I’ve long felt that referring to ABC, NBC, CBS or CNN as ‘mainstream media’ grants them unearned credibility and effectively accepts their claims to be professional journalists and honest brokers of news, even though they often push false, leftist narratives and agendas. But to respond by calling them ‘lamestream’ strikes me as a juvenile insult. […]

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I frequently find myself running across headlines that are eye catching and definitive, yet when I read through the article under the headline a different story gets revealed. In some cases a key piece of information is omitted, buried, or minimized. I imagine that there’s been studies that examine what percentage of people actually read […]

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Next on Thinking It Through: I interview John J. Miller (@johnmiller), national correspondent for the National Review, and the director of the Dow Journalism Program at Hillsdale College. We touch on our appreciation for Ricochet and other things, from his podcast to politics and journalism. Because of bad recording on my part in the beginning […]

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