Tag: Jim Gilmore

A Glossary of 2016 Campaign Terms I Just Made Up

 

As hispandering (pandering to Hispanics) enters the American political lexicon, so too do a host of other terms whose meanings may not be immediately clear in the rapidly-changing landscape of the 2016 presidential campaign. Below is a glossary of some of the newest terms and their definitions.

Kasichiness – Most often afflicting Democrat and establishment Republican governors, this condition results in the irresistible itch to expand your state’s roll in bankrupting the already insolvent Medicaid program. Scratching this itch usually only makes the condition worse.

The State of the Race

 

Debate2This won’t be another debate recap post. An army of pundits (Please note: Worst. Army. Ever.) has already dissected last night’s proceedings and the emerging consensus seems about right to me: Carly Fiorina dominated, Marco Rubio and Chris Christie both had some pretty good moments, and Donald Trump’s pilot light kept shutting off. Everyone else was basically treading water. In the undercard debate, Bobby Jindal and Lindsey Graham both looked serviceable, but c’mon — it’s not that big of a deal to win the NIT.

So let’s play the story forward: after last night, what dynamics play out over the six weeks until the next GOP debate takes place in Boulder, Colorado? (Seriously, RNC? Boulder? Was George Soros’ penthouse booked that night?) Here are some of the trends I’ll be watching for:

Carly in the Crosshairs

Who Won the First GOP Debate?

 

debatetoppernewtop33660_20150806_185747The first GOP debate just wrapped up — not the one with Jeb! and The Donald, but the B-team. These are the seven candidates who didn’t have enough juice in the polls to make the main debate coming at 9 p.m. ET. All of them entered this JV debate hoping to make enough of an impact to enter the top tier the next time around. I wish Fox News had set it up so the winner of this contest immediately reported to the prime time debate, but alas, this is politics, not “Top Chef.”

It is a bit of a misnomer for the RNC to call these proceedings a “debate.” None of the candidates interacted, but rather held a low-energy Q-and-A with two Fox reporters. Questions were asked; each candidate had 60 seconds to respond. So how did they do? Here’s how I rank the performances:

1. Carly Fiorina