Tag: Jim Gaffigan

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When I lived in places where there was a Spring, rather than California where there isn’t, I used to love the month of May. Heck, in Chicago I often even loved the last week or two of March. People would shed their scarves and coats, their pants and long underwear. Young ladies would be answering […]

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Comedian and actor Jim Gaffigan stops by to discuss the long and painful journey to a career in the entertainment industry, from studying finance at Georgetown, to taking improv classes so he can overcome his fear of speaking in meetings at the advertising agency where he worked, to falling in love with stand-up and watching everyone else in his comedy class find success before he did. Jim talks why failure is such a great teacher, getting lost in other people’s expectations, the creepy thing about doing press, and why he doesn’t want power. In his new movie, American Dreamer, he gets the chance to play against type with a complex character in a disturbing thriller, and he shares how he could relate to the delusions of his character, the American fantasy of the “quick fix,” and the rewards of being able to explore a dark character. He and Bridget marvel at Joe Rogan’s abilities, commiserate over the repressed rage of comedians, and reflect that more dangerous than cancel culture, is the growing trend of leaving people out of the discussion altogether.

Full transcript available here: WiW49-JimGaffigan-Transcript

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That’s the only thing I can conclude from watching the very funny first episode of the new sitcom by just-about-my-favorite comedian, Jim Gaffigan. The cameos alone were amazing – people who have been the topic of many a post here at Ricochet. Would you believe  – Jon Stewart? and Glenn Beck? Preview Open

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