Tag: Jim Crow

It’s Not Jim Crow

 

The outrage from Democrats and Republicans (for different reasons) regarding the changes to Georgia’s voting laws is just plain pathetic. Although it’s tempting to ignore them, the arguments from both sides are misleading, incomplete, and dangerous. And more of these laws are being passed and proposed by other states to bring integrity and fairness to the voting laws.

The Federal government is doing everything in its power to wrest away the power to define elections that have been governed by the states, and Republicans have to stop making vague and general protests about the accusations, denying the incorrectness of the criticisms and, and state why the new laws will actually benefit all peoples, black, white, and other races.

We must overcome the hyperbolic language of the Left from dominating the conversation and educate the public. We also must acknowledge that we have allowed our schools to deprive our children of a legitimate education about the history of race, particularly in the areas of voting rights and elections; these are the people who will influence how we move forward into the elections of the future. I propose that we briefly review the origin of “Jim Crow Laws,” limit our discussion to their application to elections, and then identify how to enlighten the public about the efficacy and appropriateness of the election changes we anticipate.

Member Post

 

In the last Presidential election, Donald Trump was lauded for his performance among black voters – he scored 4 percent of female black voters and a whopping 13 percent of black male voters, the highest since Richard Nixon. This isn’t shocking. Black voters have voted en masse for the Democratic Party since the mid-60s and […]

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“The Constitution gives you the right, as a white man, to have a rifle in your home. The Constitution gives you the right to protect yourself. Why is it ‘ominous’ when black people even talk of having rifles? Why don’t we have the right to self-defense? Is it because maybe you know we’re going to […]

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There is a daily blogger who appears in my medium.com feed almost every day, because many months ago I made the mistake of commenting on something he’d written. It was a mistake because his daily columns are easily some of the worst examples of “economics” in existence. Occasionally I tweet out this trash with a […]

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Should the Democratic Party Change Its Name?

 

My answer? It is the party of slavery.

Yes, after their support for slavery and racist laws and regulations for all those decades it’s clear that the well documented and unambiguous racist history of that party should make us all demand that the party distance itself from their history of racism. The party name makes me blanch every time I hear it or read it. How can anyone be associated with such a party that is laced with a sordid history of hatred and bigotry and racism?

Are We Rethinking Our Civil War Reconciliation?

 

RTX1HF3B-1024x734My family was in Iowa at the outbreak of the Civil War and I have one ancestor that fought for the Union. I grew up in the South but I was always grateful that the North won the Civil War. Slavery was noxious and a great evil in the American experiment. We could have had a peaceful resolution to slavery but the South broke the rules of the game and as they started to lose politically they tried their very, very best to destroy the United States. It was a very good thing that the Confederacy lost the Civil War — and in the long term — it was very good for all the states in the Confederacy that they lost the Civil War.

Having said that, I have always thought that America’s reconciliation after the Civil War is an under-appreciated miracle. The speed at which the country could unite against a common foe during the Spanish-American War — when many Civil War veterans were still alive — is remarkable. Not only that, but the career of Varina Howell Davis is equally amazing, going from being the First Lady of the Confederacy to becoming a celebrated writer in New York City.

Many have talked about the courage of Lee in making sure the Confederate Army did not break up and start guerrilla war against the Union, and rightly so. But equally important was the fact the the South could have just sat out of the American life as well. That would have been disastrous.

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As many have pointed out since President Obama’s speech at the National Prayer Breakfast, he’s pretty free with riding the low horse of confession for the sins of others. He expressed sorrow for the sins of the Church committed hundreds of years ago and for the United States since its inception. He really has no […]

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