Tag: Jason Miyares

Member Post

 

Pretend you’re a US Senator and presented with this choice: You have $80 billion to “invest” to bolster recruitment and staffing in one of these public-funded institutions. You can choose one or two out of three (yes, I know there is a fourth choice. Play along): A. Give it all to the Internal Revenue Service […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

A Tsunami Isn’t “Coming.” It’s Here

 

It’s probably unfair, even inaccurate, to describe current political trends in the US as a “tsunami” unless of course, you’re a self-proclaimed “progressive” Democrat. Tsunamis are large and highly destructive ocean waves, often caused by underwater earthquakes or volcanic disruptions. Nobody asks for nor wants to experience one, perhaps unless you’re the actual tsunami. Politically speaking, of course.

In the minds of many Americans, the coming tsunami isn’t destructive at all, despite media attempts to portray it as such. It’s restorative. And there is plenty of evidence that Democrats asked for it, starting with the consequences of an open southern border, rising crime rates amidst soft-on-crime and defund-the-police strategies, weakness abroad, lingering COVID mandates, teacher unions prioritized over students, and raging inflation at home.

Uh Oh. Youngkin Meant What He Said

 

Two unique characteristics partially define the Commonwealth of Virginia’s governor. First, he (or she, although no woman has yet been elected governor) is elected in odd-numbered years. And second, he serves only for a single four-year term. Governors here cannot run to succeed themselves (but they can try to run again later, as former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe tried and failed to do in 2021).

That may give some partisans in the losing party hope that a new governor might not govern as promised. Perhaps “legacy mode” kicks in on Day One. There’s no political pressure to deliver other than mid-term (also odd-year) state legislative elections.

Virginia Down-Ticket

 

Winsome Sears (Serious!)

As the race for the Virginia governor’s mansion is sucking up all the oxygen, it is worth keeping an eye on the down-ticket races that will also be decided. The headline race may be a bellwether of things to come. And in fact, even a close loss may still turn a lot of heads. There is an excellent synopsis of the polling and status by Kelly D Johnston here.

But as a Virginia resident, the race for Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General have just as much interest. In both cases, the GOP has nominated exceptional candidates. Former Marine and (believe it or not) electrician, Winsome Sears is a breath of fresh air. Perhaps no more than in this awesome press release photo.

Member Post

 

Americans are used to focusing on elections in even-numbered years. Only a handful of states – Virginia, New Jersey, Louisiana, and Kentucky – are known for odd-year electoral contests. And Louisiana and Kentucky aren’t due for one until 2023. Some states, like Pennsylvania, have a few local and judicial elections in odd-numbered years. Virginia’s diverse […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.