Tag: Japan

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Is This Cruel and Unusual Punishment?

 

I was reading an article in the Wall Street Journal this week. Here are some sentences describing someone’s imprisonment.

  • Alone in his cell, he isn’t permitted to leave (on weekends) for the 30 minutes of fresh air he gets on weekdays.
  • The lights burn 24 hours a day.
  • He can’t wear a watch and sometimes finds himself disoriented.
  • Authorities state this is “normal treatment.”
  • He has been interrogated for up to five hours a day, with no lawyer present.
  • Prosecutors can sometimes harangue suspects who choose to remain silent for ten hours a day.
  • The person is forced to sign statements in a foreign language that he cannot read.
  • Family members are not allowed to visit.
  • The cell has a window, but it is very deep in the wall and the prisoner cannot see out.
  • Prisoner is allowed a shower twice a week (three times a week in summer). Cold water is all he gets from the tap in his cell.

So, what do you think of this punishment being meted out, to a person imprisoned for a non-violent, financial crime? It sounds cruel and unusual to me, especially for a person charged with a white-collar crime, who has not yet had his day in court. He has not been convicted, or even tried, for this crime. He is being treated like a violent criminal, subject to conditions often found in high-security prisons.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ichiro Retires

 

A few years ago, Ichiro Suzuki said his goal was to play major league baseball until he was 50. Well, that’s one baseball goal Ichiro won’t attain. Yesterday, March 21, 2019, the 45-year-old told the Mariners that today’s game would be his last. It was a homecoming of sorts for Ichiro, as the Mariners started the season with a two-game set against the Oakland A’s in Tokyo, Japan. Although the Mariners swept the two games, Ichiro went hitless in both games but received a well-deserved standing ovation as he was removed from the second game in the bottom of the eighth. Thus ended one of the most unique careers of all time.

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Member Post

 

American pop culture isn’t the only one infested with gay propaganda and imagery. This video from BiSH, オーケストラ (“Orchestra”) features a storyline about a schoolgirl romance. It’s a beautifully done video. BiSH always does wonderful videos. (And sometimes devastating, heartbreaking, leave you crying videos {And you don’t need to speak a word of Japanese to be […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Dennis Prager on the Self-Righteously Suicidal West and False Morality

 

For this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast, I had nationally syndicated radio host, columnist, author of numerous books, teacher, film producer and co-founder of PragerU, Dennis Prager, on the podcast to discuss among other things:

  • How Dennis Prager ended up a conservative as an Ivy League-educated Jewish intellectual from Brooklyn, New York — contrary to so many of his peers
  • How perceptions of human nature divide Left and Right
  • Whether government has filled the void of religion for the increasingly secular and progressive American coasts
  • How the good intentions that underlie Leftist policy prescriptions lead to horrendous outcomes — and emotion versus reason on the Left and Right
  • The false morality underlying European immigration policy with respect to the Muslim world, and Prager’s criticism of Jewish support of mass immigration consisting disproportionately of Jew-haters
  • The self-righteous suicidalism of the West
  • The Leftist bias of social media platforms and PragerU’s legal battle with YouTube/Google

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found, download the episode directly here or read the transcript here.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Understanding in a Foreign Language

 

When I first came to Japan, I could not speak the language. I came to the country in a job straight out of college, teaching conversational English in a juku, or cram school, in a town outside of Osaka, and my high school French and college German were of no use to me.

The first weeks were hard, trying to learn everything. I began copying the written kana daily in both forms, hiragana and katakana, so that I could be able to read signs, menus, and labels. I hired a teacher and attended lessons weekly. I talked with new friends most nights in a local bar and picked up Osaka-ben, or slang.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why Not Proliferate?

 

I’ve been following the news about the Summit and the discussion on this thread, and there seems to be quite a difference of opinion. Not only about the wisdom and utility of the Summit and its outcome, but about our role in the region in the first place. Some of the Trumpier commenters say — and I have a certain amount of sympathy for this view — that keeping American troops in South Korea at this late date is both provocative and expensive.

It’s certainly the latter, and one of my great long-term fears is that like so many empires before us, keeping the Pax Americana over so much of the globe will eventually exhaust us financially. It is straining us now, and part of the “America first” theme on which Trump was elected was the notion that we should, first and foremost, take care of our own.

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Banter, an AEI Podcast

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This week on Banter, AEI Research Fellow Phill Lohaus joins the show to discuss the security environment in the Asia Pacific. Phill is cohosting an event with his colleague Tom Donnelly on June 1 featuring a panel of security experts discussing how the United States can keep its competitive edge in the Asia Pacific. You […]

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As North and South Korean leaders meet to discuss a possible peace agreement and an end to decades of hostility, is President Trump’s next move a one-on-one summit with the “honorable” Kim Jong-un? Hoover senior fellow Thomas Henriksen assesses the stakes on the Korean peninsula and what Trump could and should not do to avoid […]

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Member Post

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are aghast as the threat to life along the Texas coast gets more dire but they are amazed at the tireless efforts by exhausted heroes to save thousands and thousands of lives. They also disgusted, but not surprised, as North Korea fired a missile […]

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Member Post

 

Pushing the Narrative: Bloomberg says the Japanese economy is doing great, so it should have more immigrants. But the points in the article contradict the Narrative. Since the economy is doing well and there is no pool of cheap third world labor, it means wages are rising for indigenous workers. It also demonstrates that, contra the Open […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Ripping Families Apart Podcast

 
Want to help the HLC podcast continue to prosper and grow? Please take just a minute to go to iTunes and give us 5 stars! Don’t know how? It’s easy: directions here. We thank you!

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for April 4, 2017, it’s the Ripping Families Apart Podcast, brought to you this week by SimpliSafe. Start protecting your home the smart way using the award winning system that is revolutionizing the industry by going to SimpliSafe.com. And we are brought to you by Harry’s. I use it. I love it. Nuff said?

This week, there’s a bombing in Saint Pete, we’re about to nuke Jong Un, there’s a Senate filibuster that’s about to change the tune (there’s a Scout Troup short a child, Kruschev’s due at Idelwild…). Etc. but *we* gentle listeners, are going to talk about panic…as in panic attack…as in the L.A. Times has this time really lost it. And the left can’t take it anymore. Talk to your liberal friends – or find some liberals to befriend and talk to them. They *believe* that Trump is on the threshold of impeachment. Trump’s tweets prove it. It is fascinating and fun to watch the meltdown. (What is a meltdown called when it is pereptual?).

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Trump’s New Travel Order, New North Korean Threat, Politics Trump Education

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the Trump administration’s new executive order temporarily banning travel from six nations with major terrorism problems. They also react to North Korea announcing its latest missile tests were designed to strike U.S. bases in Japan. And they slam teachers in Alexandria, Virginia, for forcing the cancellation of school because 300 of them plan to attend the anti-Trump women’s march.

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Member Post

 

The Japanese haven’t forgotten. The place is my living room, the time is yesterday morning Japan time, or this morning U.S. time. I’m reading the newspaper, specifically the Yomiuri Shimbun, which has the highest circulation of all newspapers in Japan, over 9 million. As I’m flipping pages, I get to the centerfold, and am confronted […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. An Impressive Engineering and Disaster-Response Effort

 

Imagine you wake one morning and find a huge sinkhole in the street passing in front of your house, measuring roughly 100 feet by 90 feet, and going down about 50 feet. The collapse has severed water, sewage and gas pipes, as well as cableways for electrical and telecommunications wires, leaving you in the dark with no way to flush. How long do you think it would take to fill the hole, open the street to traffic, and get your utilities working again? Several months might be an optimistic estimate for many.

Hakata Sinkhole, 8 November

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Member Post

 

I was originally going to post this yesterday, as a means to temporarily escape the immanent approach of a new Clinton administration. That didn’t happen, so here’s the mix as a general escape, and as an opportunity to hear songs that you’ll recognize in terms of musical styles, but (unless you’re acquainted with Japanese popular […]

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Member Post

 

The tanka is a form that comes from Japan. Courtiers were expected to not only be poets, but to compose poetry extemporaneously. The tanka was the basic building block of much of this style of court poetry. It is a five line form in two parts, and it was not unusual for the first courtier […]

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Member Post

 

Since I’ve coughed up another $40, I might as well get something for it, so I’m going to ask for some advice. Mr. Rand and I planned a trip to Japan for the first week in October and quickly realized that the only things we knew about Japan were that it lost World War II […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Why I’ve Changed My Mind On Trump

 
shutterstock_353100986
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

Early on, I was a bit seduced by Donald Trump, mostly because he has exquisite taste in enemies and because my political instincts incline me toward populist upstarts and against arrogant establishments. In the early 1990s, for example, I was an early and enthusiastic supporter of the Reform Party of Canada. At the time, the Canadian political establishment was at its most corrupt, arrogant, and insular and the Reform Party was the right antidote.

So when the incompetent GOP establishment went ballistic against the real estate mogul, I naturally felt sympathetic toward him. My sympathy, moreover, seemed validated by how ham-fisted the attacks against him turned out to be. But while today’s American political establishment is equally corrupt, arrogant, and insular as the one Manning toppled two decades ago, Donald Trump is not the answer Americans should be seeking. Donald Trump, you are no Preston Manning.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Trump’s Failure to Judge Risk: Why U.S. Security Can’t Be Run Like a Business

 

shutterstock_48936454Over the past week, Donald Trump has doubled-down on his pro-nuclear proliferation stance with regard to Japan and South Korea (or, at the very least, being very open to the idea of those countries arming). Trump’s reasoning is simple: he doesn’t believe the United States should foot the bill for others’ security without being better compensated for its efforts. For Trump’s supporters, this stance demonstrates his ability to think like a business man and to run the country like a business.

The problem with Trump’s thinking on this matter is that maintaining national security requires a different cost-benefit analysis than does running a hotel or casino. Simply put, Trump fails to apply the appropriate risk analysis to the situation. We spend our treasure protecting Japan and South Korea not so much for altruistic reasons, but because the risk of nuclear proliferation is so great that we can’t afford not to.

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