Tag: International Economics

In this AEI Events Podcast, leading experts join AEI’s John R. Bolton and Desmond Lachman to discuss the challenges and opportunities of Brexit after the United Kingdom elections. Ambassador John R. Bolton, senior fellow at AEI, discusses the EU’s “secular theology,” which argues the EU has brought peace and prosperity to Europe. David O’Sullivan, ambassador of the European Union to the United States, disagrees, asserting that the EU had allowed peaceful resolution of conflicts. He highlights that defining a post-Brexit relationship between the UK and the EU will take several years.

Adam Posen, president of the Peterson Institute, addresses the negative economic shocks the UK will face if, because of Brexit, it loses tariff-free access to Europe, its largest trading partner. Hugo Gurdon, editorial director of the Washington Examiner, pays tribute to the EU as a project for peace but argued that the UK’s history of constitutional stability and relations with the world, rather than Europe, means Brexit was the right choice for the UK. Finally, AEI’s Desmond Lachman emphasizes that the EU, especially the eurozone, faces severe economic problems associated with the risk of a breakup.

Richard Epstein warns of the dangers of Donald Trump’s position on international trade, and considers controversies about trade deficits, the border adjustment tax, and job losses due to automation.

The Libertarian Podcast: Greece, Germany, and the European Union

 

In this week’s installment of The Libertarian podcast from the Hoover Institution, I talk with Professor Epstein about the ongoing debt crisis in Greece. How did they get there? Are Germany and other creditors running the risk of going too easy on Athens—or too hard? Is the collapse of Europe’s currency union only a matter of time? Those are among the questions we’re discussing. Listen in below or take us on your mobile device by subscribing with iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.

Why Europe is No Help, Or, Okay, Now What?

 

Even if President Obama demonstrated an appetite for imposing serious sanctions on Russia, it’s not at all clear that the European Union would support him. Why? From the London Spectator:

[T]he gaping rift between the EU and America stands exposed. The Washington hawks gained almost no traction in western Europe, where there was little appetite for conflict. Even if Russia didn’t supply a third of Europe’s oil and gas, other commercial ties still bind. EU trade with Russia was £280 billion in 2012. America’s total was a twelfth of that, little of it in hydrocarbons. No wonder the hawks have been frustrated that the EU won’t do more.