Tag: Intelligence

Member Post

 

I dunno if I buy it. The evidence behind the Flynn Effect is pretty compelling. Still, it’s worth further study: An extensive data analysis published in 2013 found just the opposite. Our ancestors in the Victorian era (1837-1901) were smarter than us. Much smarter. Here is an excerpt from the abstract: More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

This is my second time trying Riochet. During my first subscription, I simply didn’t find it compelling and quickly forgot about it. This time around, I exercised what used to be called “netiquette”. I lurked, got what I thought was the lay of the land and finally posted. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Unless you’re a gamer, you probably have not heard of Horizon Zero Dawn. Guerrilla Games’ upcoming product for the Playstation 4 console, the story is set a thousand years into the future and proceeds from a fascinating premise. Typically, science fiction involving “the rise of the machines” — domination of humanity by independent AI (use whatever […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

End the Ricochet Code of Conduct!

 

cursingFor the past few years, whenever I’ve made a pitch for new members, I’ve always included something along the lines of this:

The internet is a swamp. The “comments” on most webpages are disgusting nonsense. We’re different. We have standards:

More

Meritocracy and Its Discontents

 

shutterstock_228878062Toby Young — British education reformer, food critic, self-described “anarcho-cynicalist,” man-about-town, and frequent denizen of Radio Free Delingpole – has an interesting and timely article in the current issue of the Australian journal Quadrant, titled The Fall of the Meritocracy. The title is misleading: it would be more aptly titled “The Total and Complete Triumph of the Meritocracy.” Regardless, it is a worthwhile read.

The article makes plain that, far from being an unalloyed public good, meritocracy is seriously flawed as an organizing principle for society. Young’s basic argument is straightforward: because the traits associated with success are highly heritable, and because successful people increasingly marry and breed with each other, an efficiently meritocratic society like ours will have less and less social mobility and, over time, result in an entrenched class system far more rigid and permanent than anything that existed before the mid-20th century. This process is already well advanced in Britain and the United States. Not to worry though: Young has a highly original solution to this problem and ends on a somewhat upbeat note.

More

Member Post

 

Only a fool would expect President Obama or his administration to be honest with the public after his many years in office. But one might hope that the President’s advisers are at least honest among themselves. According to Shane Harris at The Daily Beast, that too is wishful thinking. Two senior analysts at CENTCOM signed […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Limits to Curmudgeonhood?

 

In a conversation last month, the subject of curmudgeonhood came up. There were some advocates of a minimum age restriction that would start somewhere around fifty. In short, their view was that curmudgeonhood was earned through experience.

My dictionary’s* definition of curmudgeon is: “A surly, ill-mannered, bad-tempered person; cantankerous fellow.”

More

Intelligence 101 with Herbert E. Meyer

 

HerbMeyer154pxSteven Hayward’s interview with Ricochet contributor Herbert E. Meyer about national intelligence would be worth posting under any circumstances. Herb —- former Assistant to the Director of the CIA, Vice Chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal winner — is one of the clearest speakers on the subject, and was a key figure in predicting the collapse of the Soviet Union, one of the CIA’s greatest victories.

However, we have a special opportunity for members: Herb will be answering questions directly in the comments this afternoon. If you want to know more about the CIA during the Reagan years, or ask about its recent struggles and failures, this is a great opportunity. Take a listen and fire away.

More

Why Hasn’t James Clapper Been Fired?

 

384px-James_R._Clapper_official_portraitYou might think that a cabinet-level intelligence officer who learns about terror plots from the news, lies to Congress about domestic spying, mistakenly characterizes an Islamist political movement taking power in a nation that’s a strategic ally as “largely secular,” and then fails to warn the President of the United States about the rise of a terror group unlike any seen since al-Qaeda destroyed the World Trade Center, might lose his job. In the Obama administration, you would be wrong.

On Sunday’s 60 Minutes, President Obama blamed “the intelligence community” for failing to assess the threat from ISIS, a/k/a “the JV team.” Passing the buck to the Director of National Intelligence, the president said: “I think our head of the intelligence community, Jim Clapper, has acknowledged that they underestimated what had been taking place in Syria” (my emphasis).

More